View Full Version : HHow did you react when you had your diagnostic?


sushigirl
09-24-14, 07:55 PM
My doc told me today that i had adhd-I.

The whole afternoon i was in a good mood, kind of relieved to know that I'm not crazy.

But tonight, i feel so sad. I just want to cry:( it's like if my future is over. That I have no way to get out of this.

How was your reaction at first and once the reality sat in?

silivrentoliel
09-24-14, 08:00 PM
There's a definite adjustment period... the 5 stages of grief, almost.

I was diagnosed at 6, and then re-diagnosed about 3 years ago, and even though I knew I had ADHD, it was a huge adjustment for me to really begin to understand what all that entailed.

thepitcher10
09-24-14, 08:30 PM
Relief. Finally found what had been plaguing me for the longest time.

KnuteKlutz
10-12-14, 09:01 AM
I don't mean to be a downer, but...

I had the usual initial reaction - being able to put an explanation to all the **** you had to put up with in your life, and knowing that there are ways to cope with it at your disposal.

Then comes the grief of only finding out much later in life and realizing that you can't change the past; all the times people told you you were wasting your potential, the people you pushed away, all the times you could have done better and ended up in a different place, with a different outlook and a lot less emotional baggage. You can't take that back.

Then the upsetting reality that the diagnosis is not enough, that even with medication and counselling you need to work a long time to learn habits that were long ingrained in your peers years ago. That you may never be the same as them anyway (I came to terms with that long before, though), and that our brains are wired in ways that mean we'll never think like other people do.

The stage I'm struggling at right now is accepting that most NT's aren't that tolerant of people who aren't as capable as they are in some ways (organisationally, socially, etc), and won't really care about your ADD or even be able to understand it. You can only bring it up so many times before people get tired of it, and to be honest, if I was NT, I'm not sure it wouldn't just start sounding like an excuse for everything after awhile.

That said, the future isn't set in stone. Knowledge is power, and you have the power to claim a different destiny from the path that would have seen you never find out. Look to the future, friend.

Crosswired
10-12-14, 03:40 PM
Very well said KnuteKlutz. I was diagnosed 3 years ago at age 34 after things fell apart for me when I entered adulthood and I couldn't keep up. I was always able to do just enough to get by up until around age 25. That's when my peers really started to leave me behind as far as progress and development. They were getting promotions, married, buying houses etc. I was stuck at the same entry-level type position for 5 years. Issues with things like organization, time management, motivation and impulse control were really impacting all facets of my life.

Self-awareness of my limitations and an explanation for them has helped me deal, but I also struggle with trying to get others in my life to understand how I am different. My parents still think it's just a matter of me needing to trying harder. My relationships with family, friends, girlfriends, and employers continue to suffer.

The past is done. I am forging ahead with new found knowledge. To the future!

Little Missy
10-12-14, 03:46 PM
:goodpost:

Personally, all that I am able to do is try to do the very best that I can every single day. I do wish I could invent the 'Way Back Machine' though.

Flory
10-12-14, 03:46 PM
Was a very long time ago when I was a kid, I remember throwing a tantrum when my mum and dad said I had to go to see the psychiatrist

Meteodan
10-13-14, 10:04 AM
At first, major relief, to be honest (I was diagnosed about 9 months ago). I finally had an explanation for all the difficulties with motivation, time management, focus, and poor organizational and planning skills I had been experiencing for virtually my entire life, and that had reached a fever pitch when I started my first postdoc (i.e. "real" job).

I still have some of that feeling of relief left, but since then, as others have said, reality has set in. Finding the right medication and dosage took several months, and even now I'm still working on adjusting the dose (I imagine this will be an ongoing process). Also, I am now facing the consequences of all the unfinished projects that have been piling up on my desk for the past 4-5 years, and am slowly trying to dig myself out of the hole I've been in. I'm making progress, but it's slower than I would like.

I've also had feelings of wishing that I would have figured this out years ago. I think I could have avoided lots of grief. At the same time, however, who knows how else my life would have been different; I may not have some of the opportunities I do now, and despite my condition I've been able to maintain good relationships with friends, colleagues, my wife, and my family. I am blessed in particular with a loving and understanding wife and family.

I still have a long way to go and have realized that medication doesn't fix everything. It does however, open the door for being able to fix things and improve myself, so I am hopeful and optimistic. For the first time in my life, I feel I can actually thrive in my career and domestic life, rather than just merely get by.

oldtimer
10-16-14, 09:53 AM
I would prefer to have a known condition instead of just being crazy. There are treatments. I suggest you get Amen's book Healing ADD. I am sure that will help you may your life better if you follow his advice. Most forms of ADD are quite treatable. You will never be fully cured but your problems will become smaller and manageable.

TurtleBrain
10-16-14, 03:46 PM
I already knew I it a decade before being diagnosed, I just didn't feel like I needed any treatment for it until college. My reaction was more like "tell me something I don't already know". There's no logical reason to believe getting diagnosed is going to change anything (other than taking an hour or two out of your month to get refills and psychotherapy) because it only confirms what you were born and raised with.... that's assuming you really have it and aren't getting yourself misdiagnosed with it.

So basically my reaction is like what some have mentioned here already... it's an "oh, that explains the story of my life"..Then life moves on.

About your future, there's a thing I tell myself sometimes "Instead of making excuses why you think you can't make it, why not make excuses for why you can"?

sabotender
10-17-14, 05:47 AM
Shocked actually, in fact I still wonder if that's what I'm having, but I do know all my life I'm not quite 'normal' because it's bad enough to cause me problems in my daily life, and I was mistaken about ADD or ADHD before that.

Fuzzy12
10-17-14, 06:10 AM
I cried a bit with relief.

daveddd
10-17-14, 06:30 AM
honestly at the time i didn't care

another doctor another diagnosis

finallyfound10
10-18-14, 01:28 PM
I was relieved but did grieve as well. I was 40 and found out after failing a course then eventually another course which led to being dismissed from RN school.

KnuteKluz's and Crosswired's reactions and experiences basically mirror mine.

michaelaisabell
11-03-14, 12:44 AM
I havnt been officially diagnosed. I saw a therapist ( new one anyway) twice and she thinks I'm adhd but I'm waiting to see my p dr later this month to try to get my official diagnosis changed to adhd and get on some meds and into therapy since right now I'm using my husbands EAP program and I only get a few sessions with this therapist,
Right now my p dr office has me diagnosed with a mood disorder nos.
the dr I saw there 3 years ago is no longer thee so I'll be seeing someone new.

MellyG53
11-11-14, 09:28 AM
I'm aboard the relief boat. It explains basically every single one of my obnoxious quirks. It's nice to know that there's a legitimate reason why I am the way I am, and now I know how to begin working on things.

Wakethenight
11-17-14, 08:59 PM
I was furious. I still don't think I have ADD and it must be some underlying health issue.

I had gone to a Neuropsychologist for memory problems and brain fog (my primary care doctor recommended me). I was an A+ student in honor classes through high school, was in the top of my class, and had an incredible memory. I saw a decline in short term memory in college and started having brain fog issues. The Doctor gave me the Diagnosis of ADD-PI when I was 26 and she said it went undiagnosed because of "my high cognitive abilities" and that stress/responsibility of being an adult made my ADD symptoms more prominent.

Which I think is utter bull, because I had more stress/responsibility as teen because I was taking care of my mother and my younger brother in addition to schoolwork and working. And if my cognitive abilities were so high, where did they go? I also didn't have brainfog when I was younger.

I went to another doctor, she said I didn't have ADD(and I failed one specific section of the test).

I went to a third doc(because I wanted to figure out this brain fog thing) and he said I had ADD.

It is very frustrating, because I don't think I have ADD. I know I exhibit signs of ADD-PI and, infact, exhibit more signs of SCT. However, I think I have some underlying health issue that no Doctor is probably going to take serious until I am older and exhibit worst--more obvious--signs. And, of course, then a doctor will say...."well if only we had found this out earlier." >_<

Wowwowwow
11-17-14, 09:10 PM
I found it was a relief, stress had a lot to do with me getting diagnosed,add and anxiety are close freinds,least we know why were different,now we deal with it...

ahmeda
11-24-14, 05:07 AM
Shocked actually, in fact I still wonder if that's what I'm having, but I do know all my life I'm not quite 'normal' because it's bad enough to cause me problems in my daily life, and I was mistaken about ADD or ADHD before that.

Same here. I was a very good student, and have a Masters´ degree with highest grades. But work life has been quite a roller coaster.:mad:

Cdnstargazer
12-03-14, 07:16 PM
Very well said KnuteKlutz. I was diagnosed 3 years ago at age 34 after things fell apart for me when I entered adulthood and I couldn't keep up. I was always able to do just enough to get by up until around age 25. That's when my peers really started to leave me behind as far as progress and development. They were getting promotions, married, buying houses etc. I was stuck at the same entry-level type position for 5 years. Issues with things like organization, time management, motivation and impulse control were really impacting all facets of my life.

Self-awareness of my limitations and an explanation for them has helped me deal, but I also struggle with trying to get others in my life to understand how I am different. My parents still think it's just a matter of me needing to trying harder. My relationships with family, friends, girlfriends, and employers continue to suffer.

The past is done. I am forging ahead with new found knowledge. To the future!

This sums up my life. My mid 20s I was diagnosed. Just last month actually. I was so relieved. Getting medicated to function normally has been a godsend as has finding this forum. My other self esteem issues need to be addressed as well but they seem to be improving now that I can frigging focus and have normal motivation. :)

It gets better.

Cdnstargazer
12-14-14, 02:27 AM
I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety for several years before being recently assessed and diagnosed with ADHD-PI.

Due to my constant disorganization, impulsivity, procrastination, inattention and scatterbrained methods life has been tough. I barely passes college with a diplOmaha and another certificate. I thankfully pulled through and sought a diagnosis after my relationship was on the fritz. I felt so relieved to know why I felt so stupid that I couldn't seem to get it together like everyone else...

Now that I'm being medicated and going to seek counseling, I feel relieved. I can now focus and do what regular people do to function and take for granted. It's a relief and my self esteem has improved. :)

tomsawyr
12-14-14, 04:35 PM
Like I found the trail out of the forest.

I suspected I had it. Went to the pdoc, filled out the self-report and gave it to him. He said my scores didn't add up to the ADHD diagnosis, but that, *obviously*, I had ADHD. I thought WHAAA?!

So nada
01-18-15, 01:19 AM
I felt relief and a little bit of unhappiness. It was odd. I was mostly happy as I now know what is going on and can get help. I had disappointment as I now have a diagnosis which potentially requires me to take a medication that will show up on drug tests that I will have to explain to my employer. Overall I am happy to have an answer.

tinybike
01-18-15, 01:32 AM
Relief, almost elation. It finally felt like things were off my back.

Then cycled through rage, denial, and self-pity. It's only been six weeks since I was diagnosed by my psychiatrist, although my GP clinically diagnosed me in October. In December, when it was finally confirmed, is when it became real for the first time. So I guess I'm still going through the grieving.

I think the hardest thing has been realizing that meds and therapy can only do so much. I have a psychologist who does life coaching stuff with me, and I'm figuring out my best-fit medication, but even when we reach peak potential, it's never going to be gone. I guess I thought I'd eventually function like my NT peers, when that's just not how my brain works.

Pilgrim
01-28-15, 02:48 AM
I wanted to wait a while before I responded to this.
I think it was a mixture of relief and wonder that they had a name for it. Not other stuff that didn't seem to get solved. Now I just try to reinvent myself this way. Glad for the medication though. I'm happy that I have medical help. I'll just see what happens.

Gypsy Willow
01-30-15, 03:53 PM
I don't mean to be a downer, but...


Then comes the grief of only finding out much later in life and realizing that you can't change the past; all the times people told you you were wasting your potential, the people you pushed away, all the times you could have done better and ended up in a different place, with a different outlook and a lot less emotional baggage. You can't take that back.

Then the upsetting reality that the diagnosis is not enough, that even with medication and counselling you need to work a long time to learn habits that were long ingrained in your peers years ago. That you may never be the same as them anyway (I came to terms with that long before, though), and that our brains are wired in ways that mean we'll never think like other people do.



^^^This. The first year, I was euphoric from relief. FINALLY! It all made sense now! I wasn't crazy or stupid! Then, the "honeymoon" period was over and I grieved and grieved at lost years.

Delboy31
01-30-15, 06:00 PM
I felt the same way, I was angry that I had not known that I was ADHD-I, and yet it explained a lot. But after some time to soak it in, I took solace in the fact that without help at university and grad school, I made it. My routes to success may not have been the norm, but using my techniques to create success and playing to my strengths was in fact, dealing with my ADHD without even knowing it.

loverainbow
12-30-15, 02:51 PM
I was furious. I still don't think I have ADD and it must be some underlying health issue.

I had gone to a Neuropsychologist for memory problems and brain fog (my primary care doctor recommended me). I was an A+ student in honor classes through high school, was in the top of my class, and had an incredible memory. I saw a decline in short term memory in college and started having brain fog issues. The Doctor gave me the Diagnosis of ADD-PI when I was 26 and she said it went undiagnosed because of "my high cognitive abilities" and that stress/responsibility of being an adult made my ADD symptoms more prominent.

Which I think is utter bull, because I had more stress/responsibility as teen because I was taking care of my mother and my younger brother in addition to schoolwork and working. And if my cognitive abilities were so high, where did they go? I also didn't have brainfog when I was younger.

I went to another doctor, she said I didn't have ADD(and I failed one specific section of the test).

I went to a third doc(because I wanted to figure out this brain fog thing) and he said I had ADD.

It is very frustrating, because I don't think I have ADD. I know I exhibit signs of ADD-PI and, infact, exhibit more signs of SCT. However, I think I have some underlying health issue that no Doctor is probably going to take serious until I am older and exhibit worst--more obvious--signs. And, of course, then a doctor will say...."well if only we had found this out earlier." >_<

My pdoc said the same thing about me. Basically now that I have to be an adult and cannot rely on my cognitive ability and hyperfocus on life, the symptoms of add becomes unmanageable.

loverainbow
12-30-15, 02:56 PM
I'd predict that even in the future, different pdoc would have different assessment on me. I pathom this is not surprising, gosh why can they just invent a thing to objectively measure brain waves or something.

Upon my diagnosis, I was like, I knew it? Unfortunately I let the symptoms of add wreak havoc in my life, to the point where I was too exhausted, mentally and physically, to grief and I just wanna ******* move on with my life. I cried to my two other psychologist though. With my pdoc, since he is so expensive, I am like, okay so tell me how the **** do we solve this?

Roundmouth
12-30-15, 08:09 PM
No reaction at all except some anti-klimax. A diagnosis, just a diagnosis on something that's always been there. I'd already been aware of it for ten years. I was a bit surprised that my problems were considered so grave and that I didn't match the criteria of asperger syndrom.

I never had any kind of psychiatric problems, so there never were endless months of fishing trying to find the inner core of my problems. I told them I seem to have ADHD and they agreed, then I said I have some autistic traits and they agreed again but like I said, it wasn't enough for an actual diagnosis.

RubberSoul
12-30-15, 08:58 PM
My reaction was non eventful. Like meeting up with familiar old acquaintance. I think I knew sub consciously anyway.

ADHD.Swazi
01-16-16, 01:09 PM
I was diagnosed with ADHD many years ago, I think I was 10 years old. Since then, ADHD has only been a label, I only understood it to be a hyperactivity disorder and I looked at the symptoms of my fidgeting/restlessness, nobody explained anything to me. I have been in therapy for the past 2 months, even my therapists first few words were "you have ADHD", again it was just a label. In fact, I only realised what ADHD really was when I joined this forum, that's only in the past 2 weeks.

I have been through all emotions over this, I really wish someone had explained to me exactly what ADHD was. I now understand my thought processes and behaviour, even more so, I am starting to understand myself. I feel like I am no longer fighting myself, no longer exhausting myself trying to conform to normality. Saying that though, I am very lost at the moment, I now know what uphill battles lie ahead of me.

Since reading and learning about my condition here, I have been really down, I have always been that guy who has always been happy no matter what, I can't even smile anymore. So ya, my proper diagnostic was here on addf, and it's a bitter pill to swallow..

sarahsweets
01-18-16, 09:25 AM
I was diagnosed with ADHD many years ago, I think I was 10 years old. Since then, ADHD has only been a label, I only understood it to be a hyperactivity disorder and I looked at the symptoms of my fidgeting/restlessness, nobody explained anything to me. I have been in therapy for the past 2 months, even my therapists first few words were "you have ADHD", again it was just a label. In fact, I only realised what ADHD really was when I joined this forum, that's only in the past 2 weeks.

I have been through all emotions over this, I really wish someone had explained to me exactly what ADHD was. I now understand my thought processes and behaviour, even more so, I am starting to understand myself. I feel like I am no longer fighting myself, no longer exhausting myself trying to conform to normality. Saying that though, I am very lost at the moment, I now know what uphill battles lie ahead of me.

Since reading and learning about my condition here, I have been really down, I have always been that guy who has always been happy no matter what, I can't even smile anymore. So ya, my proper diagnostic was here on addf, and it's a bitter pill to swallow..

Yes, it is a label, but life isnt over. Acceptance allows healing. Once you get medication straight and work through past issues with therapy and work on downsizing your life a bit, life isnt awful. Its not a gift thats for sure, but becoming aware of your impairments and knowing your limits can be very freeing. Keep your chin up.

DJ Bill
01-18-16, 10:46 AM
I've been thinking about this a bunch lately.. When I first really read "So I'm not, Crazy, Lazy, or Stupid" (I had owned it for years but when I read it I didn't really take it in) I was starting to tear up each time I saw another part of me in the book. That started a search for more info, I went nuts trying to ingest everything I could. Amen's site was one of the first I saw and I almost bought the Kool-Aid about the spect scans. I went to Amazon and bought another bunch of books, (I love the used book sellers on Amazon!) and finally found this place. Another teary night of reading everything I could find here.

I asked my therapist and doc about it my last visit...was armed to the teeth with a symptom list and a couple of screening tests...I didn't even get to use them. I was told that I had ADHD and that was why they had given me a medication that might help ADHD as well as the depression. Over a year ago!!and I didn't realize it!

Releif.....there was something I could do about it......excitement, hoping finally things could change a bit for the better.....

then, like has been said, grief at the lost decades. Grief that no, I won't be a normy next week. Or ever.

Now it is more of an acceptance....I realize that I HAVE to do the organizational things I need to do to make my life unmanageable...One thing that I am still mad about is that my driving isn't as good as I had thought, being a professional driver for decades. It's scary realizing I am one of those drivers I complain about, not keeping a constant speed, not able to drive in a straight line, or park between the lines in a parking lot.

There is hope, a sign of a twinkle of light at the end of the tunnel. That keeps me going.

Thank you ADD forums for giving me a place to discover this about myself, and the possibility of change.

almost forgot (imagine that) to add......Some of the shame about my past problems like failing college after being an honors student in high school....has gone away and I actually can forgive myself for some of my perceived failings in life.

thelostone
01-25-16, 04:58 AM
I felt oblivious. They told me what I had, walked me through their diagnosis which included a reading disability, gave me a list of books to read (the irony) and sent me on my merry way. I had no idea of the severity, what it really meant/the impacts it was having on my life, or anything. I was like 'ok' and 'what now'. I still don't know the answer to the latter question.

LaTizi
01-30-16, 12:23 PM
I started to cry the moment I was given the diagnosis, it wasn't a pain cry, it was like a catharsis.

Pixelatedmind
01-30-16, 01:02 PM
When I opened myself to the interview and assessment then I got a diagnosis, my reaction was complete silence, my eyes were wide open and listening carefully. I had a long silent walk afterwards trying to absorb and find peace with everything.

CrystalBeth
04-07-16, 09:32 PM
Interesting to be able to relate to all this.
Freshly diagnosed as of four days ago.
Am 23 and just thought I was dealing with things everyone deals with, so I never thought much about it, Just kinda floated on by.
Then on April 1st, I read an article about ADHD, and it resonated with me so much I scheduled to see a psychiatrist right away. Was lucky enough to see one the following Monday (The 4th) who confirmed my self-diagnosis of ADHD.

So since its only been 4 Days since my initial diagnosis, and 6 days from even discovering what ADHD really was (I just thought it was the kid who couldnt sit still, hot dang was I wrong) I'm feeling a lot.

Theres this sense that all these puzzle pieces from my life are fitting together, explaining various things.
But also this sense that the puzzle just got larger, and will take a long time to eventually put together.
I am hopeful for the future, but feel that the future I always planned for myself will also never be reachable.
I'm glad that this is something that can be treated with various methods, just not being patient with the time I understand its going to take.
Bitter-sweet for sure.

TheGreatKing
04-07-16, 10:02 PM
Shocked actually, in fact I still wonder if that's what I'm having, but I do know all my life I'm not quite 'normal' because it's bad enough to cause me problems in my daily life, and I was mistaken about ADD or ADHD before that.

I feel the same way at this moment.
keep wondering if i have it even if i got diagnosed with it.
I keep seeing people with adhd, super jittery and talking extremely fast i mean i talk fast but not extremely fast.i dunno sometimes i swear.:confused:

Greyhound1
04-07-16, 10:55 PM
I was elated when I was finally diagnosed and shocked at the same time. My current Dr. asked me if I was ever evaluated for ADHD after about 10 mins. of meeting her on my very first visit just for a check up.

I had previously given up on going to all Dr's. for about 4 years prior. I was so frustrated after seeing Dr's. and Specialists for over a decade and I only got worse with their treatments and diagnosis'.

Not a one ever brought up anything but anxiety and depression. They were always happy to give me the latest SRI or SSRI's and gladly up the dose. They always had a preconceived idea, agenda and all were poor listeners and not interested.

My General practitioner rocks. In 10 mins. of listening she was basically able to determine what a decade of Dr's. and experts couldn't.

I hug My Doc. every time I see her. She changed my life. I got evaluated and diagnosed and all of a sudden my whole life started making sense.

Previously, I honestly thought I was losing my mind, had a brain tumor or something worse and was at the end of my rope. I gave up after so many failed attempts and thought I helpless and had accepted my fate of having to live that way.

I was relieved there was an answer, it was treatable and not as terrible as my imaginations and fears were.

Niftyfox
04-13-16, 11:11 PM
Relief.

I went to see a therapist because I was struggling with my eating disorder and my marriage was on the brink of failing.. She spotted symptoms and told me about ADD at my very first appointment. I'm 25, so it came as a surprise, but makes so much sense now.

Steppe
04-14-16, 04:09 PM
My reaction is scorn and contempt.:confused::eek::confused:
I am bitter I was forced to jump through bureaucratic hoops.
I only got my bullet proof Psy.D assessment paperwork two days ago.
A grain of salt required.

I've been self medicating ADD with stimulants my whole life, I've always self medicated my allergies too. Getting the diagnosis was a formality, a license to posses a substance which was once (1965)completely legal. (I've been caught and let off to often - social pressure demanded this compromise).

Amphetamines used to be legal but medicine is a business and the money is in limiting access and supply . In order to punish addicts, ADD sufferers were thrown under the bus.

So now I have the paperwork... Arghhhhh :mad:

-----
From this paper (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377281/):

Although congressional focus on a comparatively small but frightening population of methamphetamine-injecting “speed freaks” spared industry any major inconvenience in 1970,81 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377281/#r81) law enforcement authorities had not forgotten that 80% or 90% of amphetamines seized on the street were pills manufactured by US pharmaceutical firms.82 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377281/#r82) Civil servants now stepped forward where elected representatives feared to tread. In mid-1971, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD; forerunner to today’s Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA]) exercised administrative authority gained under the 1970 act by shifting all amphetamine products to Schedule II, including methylphenidate (Ritalin) and the diet drug phenmetrazine (Preludin), both of which had proved attractive to high-dose injection abusers. Drugs in Schedule II required a fresh prescription each time they were filled, and doctors and pharmacists had to keep strict records or face prosecution. Prescription sales of amphetamines and related drugs shot up when the new restrictions were announced and then plummeted 60% below their original level when they came into effect.83 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377281/#r83) Large numbers of doctors and patients obviously realized that their “medical” usage was difficult to justify.
The move to Schedule II empowered federal narcotics authorities, in consultation with the FDA, to set quotas limiting the production of amphetamines to quantities required by medicine. Meanwhile, the FDA was narrowing legitimate uses of the amphetamines, retroactively declaring the drugs to be of unproven efficacy in obesity and depression. Manufacturers were invited to submit applications demonstrating efficacy, but in general these submissions were based on older trials and were found wanting by modern standards of clinical research. Only narcolepsy and “hyperkinetic disorder of childhood” (today’s attention deficit disorder, then rare) remained approved usages.84 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2377281/#r84)

DrumWeezer
04-17-16, 01:19 AM
I was diagnosed about a month ago with ADD. I've been seeing my NP (psychiatrist and therapist) since 2011. Her specialization is children with ADD/ADHD, but she also treats adults with or without ADD/ADHD. She does a special kind of therapy (can't remember the name) that looks at the ways in which the experiences of one's ancestors shape one's experiences today. I've always suffered from social anxiety, although as I got older I became more comfortable in approaching other people. When I started my Master's (especially after I graduated), I started having anxiety and panic attacks, which is when I started seeing her. It really took falling a part last summer for her to have any suspicions. I think this is because I've learned to perform ways to conceal my weaknesses. I think I was performing so well that I was even fooling myself. She had given me a neuropsych exams back in October. We discussed the results in March. We both looked at the results, and we both concluded that I have ADD. However, there was no push from her to start any medication unless I wanted to, which I did. I started taking Adderall about three weeks ago or so. Logically, it made sense to me. Emotionally, I was a bit shocked by it. As soon as I was diagnosed with ADD, I told all of my mentors, colleagues, etc., because I know that they have been worried about me. I also told the students that I teach because I think it is important to tell students these things. I don't think my ADD is to the extent that I cannot function. I can function without medication, but that doesn't mean that I function at my best.

sarahsweets
04-17-16, 12:43 PM
As soon as I was diagnosed with ADD, I told all of my mentors, colleagues, etc., because I know that they have been worried about me. I also told the students that I teach because I think it is important to tell students these things. I don't think my ADD is to the extent that I cannot function. I can function without medication, but that doesn't mean that I function at my best.

This was very brave and risky. All to often we are judged, criticized and discriminated against because of our adhd and any disabilities we have. Lucky for you, no one has treated you poorly because of it.

gen_car
07-29-16, 08:27 PM
Personally, I almost kissed the doctor! I knew it for about 10 years, but try getting anyone to believe you! It was hell. I was diagnosed with all kinds of weird "conditions," some that were probably made up.

The biggest fallacy is they had me believing I was an alcoholic. Sure I drank, but it was symptomatic of something much bigger. I went to AA for years, but just never 'bought it.' I can honestly say, I am not an alcoholic, an have proved it for years. I drank because I felt so 'outside,' like watching a movie. I existed, but felt like I didn't participate. So, anything to ease that pain.

But no one would look further, and I was 45 when diagnosed, and it ticks me off that I spent the majority of my life running around not comfortable in my own skin. Knowing something is desperately wrong with you, but not knowing what that is was worse than any diagnosis. That's why the AA. I hung on to it, wanted to believe it, but just didn't feel it. There was something more.

I knew what it was, but since I didn't have a license to prescribe I couldn't get any correct meds. Now, sure, I do ADDish things, but most of my problems stem from things that have nothing to do with it. I wouldn't change a thing, because ADD has made me the person I am, and I happen to like myself (most of the time.) I'd be happy to talk with you more, in private if you'd like. Just let me know.

sarahsweets
07-30-16, 06:18 AM
The biggest fallacy is they had me believing I was an alcoholic. Sure I drank, but it was symptomatic of something much bigger. I went to AA for years, but just never 'bought it.' I can honestly say, I am not an alcoholic, an have proved it for years. I drank because I felt so 'outside,' like watching a movie. I existed, but felt like I didn't participate. So, anything to ease that pain.


Im glad you found out that you were a problem drinker vs an alcoholic. Some of us like myself arent so lucky and AA can really help.

Rockkso
08-11-16, 03:56 PM
I reacted the same way I think most people do:

1) Revelation: "Holy crap this explains so many things about me that I couldn't previously."

2) Relief: "I'm not just generally stupid or lazy or careless, there is an actual neurological name for this and ways to cope with it."

3) Regret: "I feel like years of my life have been wasted because I didn't know this was a thing that I could treat."

4) Excitement: "Great, all I need is some Adderall and a good planner app and I can be normal like everyone else!"

5) Disappointment: "Actually, it's not that simple. Meds and reminder apps are helping, but they are not a cure. This is going to be a lifelong process and a lot of work."

6) Resolve: "I can manage this. I will never be perfect but I can get better, and I have support."

RjoyD1
08-29-16, 05:48 PM
I was recently diagnosed with ADHD-PI as well and I was relieved and shocked,

also happy because now I can get assistance from the the college for my tests and such.

Part of me is still in a state of disbelief.

I knew that I had more than just a learning disability in math with depression. :)