View Full Version : Book recommendation


sushigirl
10-06-14, 03:57 PM
As obsessed I can get to work on my symptoms, I'd like to have a few books recommandations, if they even exist!

About:

1. Helping me to have a more clear and precise communication. Not blurting my sentences to people.

2. How to work my memory

3. How to help with focus

4. And how to help me with my social skills.

It can be all different books.
:thankyou:

JJJJJJJJJJ
10-07-14, 11:03 PM
I've only read three books dedicated to the subject of ADD:

Hallowell's Delivered from Distraction
D. Amen's Healing ADD
Ullman's Ritalin Free Kids

I liked Hallowell's book best for some of the tips in the chapter, Seven Habits of Highly Effective ADD-ers. He has screening questions for those wondering if they have ADD or coexisting conditions. He touches on nutrition, diet, exercise but is not big into supplements. He has information on medicines.

Ullman's book is about homeopathy. I did not find it to be particularly helpful. I can't say I'm much of a fan of homeopathy. I prefer to use the things that the body naturally gets from foods--vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, etc.

Amen's book has a questionairre. It goes into depth on his 6 types of ADD. Others would call them coexisting conditions--depression, anxiety, etc. He is semi-natural and so likes supplements but prescribes medications. He has separate "strategies" for each type. He is a pioneer of SPECT brain imaging so he presents his view of the usefulness of SPECT for those with ADD. If I could only read one book on ADD this is the one I'd choose.

I read several other books that are somewhat related to the issues that ADD-ers face:

Hyman's The UltraMind Solution. Hyman is a functional medicine (semi natural) doctor. He presents much information on how diet and supplements affect brain health. This book was life changing for me because, like Hyman, I turned out to have a heavy metal problem that mainstream medicine failed to identify for many years. He wrote that he went to ten other doctors before someone identified his mercury problem.

Several other books by D Amen might be more useful depending on the individual's struggles. Change Your Brain, Change your Body would be useful for those who struggle to have adequate self control at the dinner table or cookie jar. Sex on the Brain would be useful for those struggling with self control of sexual expression at least in part due to ADD.

Re Memory. Some combination of supplement support for acetylcholine, heavy metal detox (Cutler) and catecholamine support (ADD supplements) make it easier for me to remember names when I meet someone. My memory recall speed is not as sluggish. I'm not saying that I'm now above average but I now am normal for my age after being clearly below average most of my life.

I once posted (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=site&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonibasu.com%2Farchives%2Ffdc%2F77 047.html) in a detox group about how this affected my comfort in social situations.

As obsessed I can get to work on my symptoms, I'd like to have a few books recommandations, if they even exist!

About:

1. Helping me to have a more clear and precise communication. Not blurting my sentences to people.

2. How to work my memory

3. How to help with focus

4. And how to help me with my social skills.

It can be all different books.
:thankyou:

XXYYXX
10-07-14, 11:29 PM
Nailed it

sushigirl
10-10-14, 02:33 PM
I just ordered Amen's book. Can't wait to read it!

Thanks!

Lizzie80
10-18-14, 02:13 AM
As obsessed I can get to work on my symptoms, I'd like to have a few books recommandations, if they even exist!

About:

1. Helping me to have a more clear and precise communication. Not blurting my sentences to people.

2. How to work my memory

3. How to help with focus

4. And how to help me with my social skills.

It can be all different books.
:thankyou:

Well, these books could help in a roundabout way. Julie Morgenstern's books Organizing from the Inside Out and Time Management from the Inside Out could help you with all of the above by:

1) Making you feel less hurried,
2) Developing organizing strategies for all different areas of your life, and
3) Giving you emotional support needed for dealing with issues like people-pleasing.

I know that when I freed up some time for myself, got some clarity with my mind and personal space through de-cluttering, and learned how to delegate and/or say no when tasks overwhelmed me, my communication with others automatically got better. Not just in being more polite towards others, but more thoughtful, as well. Listening is the biggest hurdle in communication, IMHO, not so much in speaking. My Granddad used to say that he'd developed the habit of thinking twice before he spoke once, and it made him a very good listener, very thoughtful of other people's feelings. I've developed no such ability to always be that nice, but I try to think of his example each day. :)

Another book (again, through a bit of a meandering path) is called The Artist's Way, by Julia Cameron. You don't have to be an artist to take advantage of the tips in it. One of her twelve steps outlined in this book, for example, was to write three journal pages a day. I wouldn't be able to keep up the practice forever, but I did this for a few months. She says to do this first thing in the morning. As an ADDer, let's just say that I didn't exactly follow this routine. But I did write daily. It got out a lot of angst, fuzzy thoughts, sadness, mental clutter, etc., onto the page. With those things put on the page, yacked about to pen and paper first, I found that I was less stressed and more articulate with others. I think this is a great tool, whether one has ADD or not, especially when you're in a period of deep reflection or trying to get to know yourself better. It was invaluable in that critical 18-to-21-year-old era for me, because I was able to sort out so much of the inner turmoil almost all young people feel. You could always use a computer instead, if you don't like writing longhand.

Have you thought about buying a used textbook on business communications or some topic that's similar? Or renting one? I'm taking a business communications course this semester in college. While the course sounds like it's geared for an office (and it is), in reality many of these communications practices apply everywhere and with everyone. If you feel that you wouldn't have the discipline to work through a textbook and develop these skills on your own, maybe taking a class would be good. There's online courses available, if going on-campus is unappealing or impossible. The textbook I use, though I neither advocate for or against reading it, is Business Communications: Process and Product, 8e. Below is a PDF version of Ch. 1, that was put out as a sales sample online. Some of this won't be applicable for what I believe you're looking for, but the subjects touched upon in Learning Objective 4 (Ex. Bypassing) get right to the heart of what ADDers can struggle with when it comes to communicating. (I'm speaking from personal experience on that!)

https://www.nelsonbrain.com/content/9780176641139.pdf

I'm going to go out on a limb with my final recommendation, but there's some excellent "social points" brought up in a book called, FIRM for Life, authored by Anna and Cynthia Benson. It's technically about an exercise program, so if you went to Amazon or some place and read the description of the book, you may think I'm nuts for suggesting this book to you. However, the book actually has a really good chapter on things imperative to communicating well with others. It isn't so much about what we say, but how we think, the habits we develop towards others- which ultimately comes from our beliefs. Yes, ADD definitely makes it harder to control what we say sometimes, but a solid foundation of thinking about how others will react to our communications in advance is important. Without that focus, I don't think we get very far in improving this aspect of ourselves. Anyway, the authors wrote things that I've never forgotten, things about social graces and how to put others at ease. It has nothing to do with advancing oneself out in the world, although good manners never hurt whatever your goals are in life. To me, it's more about developing the habit of being polite. And they really give some succinct advice on this that I've not heard elsewhere, without any flowery overtones or a bunch or spiritual stuff to wade through. Many people laughed at them for writing about the subject in a book about fitness...but it really does kind of tie into a key goal of exercising, which is ultimately about becoming the best you can be.

I hope that this helps. :)