View Full Version : Concerta+Alcohol...actually dangerous?


creativenonsens
04-11-05, 02:17 AM
Hi, I have been told over and over by the doc, No drugs, alcohol with my conerta. Well I have drank a couple times never had a single problem, and am planning on going to Canada with a buddy over the summer, and most likely get drunk off our feet. Is it dangerous to have alcohol with concerta? I take 3x18mg (I think)

Also... how long does it take for concerta to be out of my stomach so I can drink with it.


Thanks! And oh yeah, I'm over 21. (No illegal activit-ays)

TITAN
05-06-05, 04:51 PM
I took my Concerta on Saturday at 9 AM.
That night I was drinking. The stims boost your alcohol tolerance. Concerta, Ritalin, Red Bull, Ephedrine etc... All that stuff makes you tolerate alcohol better than you would, untill it wears off obviously. I had had 7 Molson XXX beers which contain twice the alcohol of a regular beer over three hours, so 14 drinks worth of alcohol. I drink infrequently and have no native tolerance for alcohol. But I had a solid buzz and felt great. At 11:30 my Concerta dropped out and I went from buzzed to hammered in about three minutes. Imagine, if you will, that you are on the railroad tracks over a bridge over a canyon with a diesel locomotive coming at you full speed. You can see the train and feel it getting closer but there is nothing you can do. I was more drunk each second than the one before. It was honestly like getting hit by a freight train. I knew I was in trouble and headed straight to the bathroom. I stumbled into my bedroom, fell into my bed and passed out. What my friends saw was: Me having a good time, telling a joke. A sudden unhappy expression, mad dash to the bathroom, stumbling into my bedroom and suddenly I was unconcious.
Thats the trouble with alcohol. You dont feel it when you are on the meds, so you drink more and when they wear off its been too much. So the blanket statement of no drinking. I believe that concerta is supposed to give you all day coverage so it will probably take 14 hours to drop out leaving 2 hours for you to get tired and get a healthy 8 hours of sleep.

exeter
05-07-05, 12:22 AM
Well, my doc did not explicitly warn me not to drink with Concerta, although I did mention I only drink infrequently. I also didn't find anything in the prescribing information other than the standard "inform your doctor if you are a substance abuser" disclaimer.

Milo
05-07-05, 05:32 AM
For me it works the opposite. Can't tolerate more than two pints of bear and then I have to sleep. Usually I can drink four without medication.
I am on Ritalin.

relvinnian
06-07-05, 04:48 PM
Unless you get completely plastered as your Concerta is peaking, you will be fine. There are some interactions between methylphenidate and alcohol, but they generally are significant only at rather high doses.

sunnymother
01-08-07, 12:29 AM
has anyone ever not been able to sleep for 2 days straight after drinking on concerta?

Adam
01-23-07, 11:41 AM
i think you did some damage to ur body there

i know someone who is not on any meds

but he drank a lot and slept for a long long time

............... i wanna say mild coma, but i dunno

Matt S.
01-23-07, 12:44 PM
I take dexedrine now and rarely have a beer or two (it's a waste of alcohol) but in my teen years when I was on ritalin I never drank but used to use pot and it was a waste of pot, didn't notice anything but the meds so I guess the fact of using more to get the effect is unhealthier while on the drug it seems pointless to me to bother... Caffiene is odd in the sense that on amphetamines i notice the effect boost but with ritalin I don't notice Caffiene or even want it

netsavy006
01-27-07, 01:36 PM
This is why I never drink. I'm not old enough yet but I know people who use alchoholic beverages to get to sleep at night, drink caffene to get up in the morning, take 2-3 meds and are a wreck and don't even realize that they are wrecks. I don't even need drinks to be a wreck, I know that for sure. lolz. Seriously though, I'm not sure if you can drink while on concerta. Since they say everything in moderation I guess a very little wouldn't be too harmful but I could be seriously wrong...

matt1244
01-26-09, 01:17 PM
I'm on concerta... And when I drink more than say, 5 shots, or 4 beers quickly, I suddenly black out. I guess what I'm saying is... Drink really slowly at first, then, gradually if your body can take it, drink more. But be really carefull. Anyone know if getting high affects you differently while on concerta?

Alexis
02-01-09, 05:30 AM
I have notice specifically that Concerta interacts very badly in lots of different ways with alcohol, I can relate to all the posts above
I used to take Equasium (another slow release methylphenidate and this had no noticable interaction with alcohol) and I still take standard ritalin which (don't tell anyone) actually works quite well with alcohol.

I think this effect is very specific to Concerta, if I'm going to be drinking alcohol on the same day I don't take my Concerta I just use standard release methylphenidate
otherwize alcohol brings out all the side effects of Concerta, headache, anxiety attacks, nausia, and the worst of all insomnia as Sunnymother says for days

thats why I try not to drink while I'm on Concerta and if I do I don't drink very much

I do like concerta though because it seems to leave me with the best elements of ADHD while removing the worst so I think it's well worth stayng on it but being responsible for how I use it (within perscribed limits) having a slow release and instant release gives you the ability to organise medication around your own needs and commitments

sorry for rambling, I'm a bit on one

xx Alexis

Alexis
02-01-09, 05:44 AM
you should obviously read the patient information label which has to list all possible side effects, In terms of Concerta these do stress quite clearly that you should not mix alcohol and concerta
In general it is best to take any medication exactly as perscribed to get the best therapeutic effect
but as the person taking the medication you are or soon will be the expert on it and should realy know more about it than people that don't take it, including doctors and pharmacists also any medication will interact diferently with each individuals complex physiology and chemical environment

I personally find that my stimulant medication works best by far if I avoid all other drugs, I think this is because my liver is free to process my medication without having to deal with other substances, alcohol complicates matters

you have to think if I can do without alcohol why don't I
on the other hand if I can't then maybe it's time to think about stopping using it

right I'm going to pop my meds now

love Alexis

fxfake
02-01-09, 02:18 PM
you should obviously read the patient information label which has to list all possible side effects, In terms of Concerta these do stress quite clearly that you should not mix alcohol and concerta

No it does not (http://www.fda.gov/cder/offices/ods/MG/methylphenidate_C_HCLMG.pdf) (unless Acrobat's search is broken, or I cannot read.)

Hi, I have been told over and over by the doc, No drugs, alcohol with my conerta.

I really think that your doctor and the pharmacy labels that do this with every drug are doing people a disservice.

Some meds are truly incompatible with booze. Most have no real interaction besides additive CNS depression. Counseling people not to drink for drugs like that (basically all drugs) means that warnings for drugs with potentially serious interactions get ignored.

Note that the only mentions of alcohol in the Concerta PI sheet are in regards to solubility (irrelevant to this discussion) and a person's tendency towards addition (tell your doctor if you've been hooked on anything). On the other hand, why would one take the two at the same time? If you're drinking in the morning, you've got a real problem. Unless you have a night job, in which case you shouldn't be drinking, why would you take Concerta in the evening?

Disclaimer: I am not saying that drinking alcohol when taking Concerta is acceptable (ask your doctor about that).

Alexis
02-01-09, 06:48 PM
well it does on mine plus it's typed on the label on the jar

Alcohol may exacerbate the adverse CNS effect of psychoactive drugs, including CONCERTA<SUP></SUP>XL. It is therefore advisable for patients to abstain from alcohol during treatment. Janssen-Cilag Ltd

Concerta Extended-Release Tablets may cause dizziness or drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol: Drugs.com

I think that as with everything you have to work it out for yourself and we can't assume that everything effects everyone in the same way or we'd all be on the same perscription

demo3210
02-02-09, 11:21 AM
Remember that alcohol + Concerta (methylphendiate) form Ethylphenidate when mixed together. Do a search on ethylphenidate to find out what you're getting yourself into.

Combining stimulants and depressents also strains your heart to make it work harder. Your heart is actually getting mixed signals from your brain saying to pump faster from the meds and pump slower from the alcohol. Both seem to raise blood pressure as well (even alcoholics/chronic drinkers have higher blood pressure on a regular basis).

Be careful. Concerta's half-life is 4-5 hours I believe. So do the math for your dosage.

fxfake
02-02-09, 12:41 PM
Remember that alcohol + Concerta (methylphendiate) form Ethylphenidate when mixed together. Do a search on ethylphenidate to find out what you're getting yourself into.

Please assist me. I see Markowitz, 2000 (http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/28/6/620) in Drug Metabolism and Disposition (I have the full paper), which, upon brief examination, provides no basis for worry, though there is an apparent interaction.

Alexis
02-02-09, 02:41 PM
fx fake
what exactly is you issue
think about it and when you work it out
please let us know

fxfake
02-02-09, 05:23 PM
fx fake
what exactly is you issue
think about it and when you work it out
please let us know

:confused: My issue is a desire to understand. Does it appear to be something else?

I'll admit annoyance at the shotgun application of alcohol warnings to prescription bottles. Why? Because it teaches us to ignore the warnings. Then, one day, we take a drug that has a real interaction with alcohol, see the same warning as with every other drug, and BAM! (Of course I try to read the PI sheets before I take anything new.)

Alexis
02-03-09, 10:11 AM
As far as I can tell you this drug has a real interaction with alcohol which I have read about and which I can experience myself by taking alcohol during the therapeutic stage of taking this drug i.e. upwards of 12 hours
With other methyphenidate medications I have had no increased side effects and in the case of instant release methyphenidate an almost complimentory interaction

On the whole I would say the pharmacists are right almost any drug will behave differently when there is alcohol in your system, notably your liver which must process
1) a subtle controlled therapeutic perscribed medication
2) a random, often excessive quantity of a (in physiological terms) poisonous substance
It finds this difficult which can lead to unpleasant chemical reactions spilling into the rest of the system
you have to bear in mind that getting drunk is the experience of overloading the liver till it can no longer process all the alcohol which then passes untreated through it causing ciriosis and getting to the brain where it causes disorientation and reduced functioning.

A serious approach to managing ADHD would without doubt exclude drinking alcohol, the next best thing would be caution. I'm sure pharmacists and doctors know we all ignore them anyway but we may be a bit more mindfull of how we manage our condition and what compromises we are willing to make, their advice is not just a load of random old wife tales plucked from thin air but is actually good advice which like all advice we must evaluate and act upon as we see fit

It did seem to me that you were throwing your toys out of the pram a bit because someone suggested you should think about your drinking behaviour, at the end of the day it's up to you, I occasionally get off my face but I have no doubt whatsoever that to maximise the therapeutic benifit of my medication I shouldn't, it's a choice I take but I don't get angry with anyone
and yes I know some drugs have a very bad reaction to alcohol, but if alcohol had a patient information leaflet listing the possible side effects we'd probably never go near it at all
so what's important to you
Deepest respect and best wishes Alexis

fxfake
02-03-09, 11:21 AM
As far as I can tell you this drug has a real interaction with alcohol which I have read about and which I can experience myself by taking alcohol during the therapeutic stage of taking this drug i.e. upwards of 12 hours
With other methyphenidate medications I have had no increased side effects and in the case of instant release methyphenidate an almost complimentory interaction

I do not understand why that would be the case. Shouldn't IR methylphenidate have the same interaction with alcohol, as Concerta is just time release methylphenidate?

It did seem to me that you were throwing your toys out of the pram a bit because someone suggested you should think about your drinking behaviour,

Toys out of the pram? Who suggested that I do so?

It seems to me that some people get annoyed when I suggest that there is no real scientific evidence of any danger of combining methylphenidate and alcohol at medical and reasonable levels, respectively. The US FDA certainly seems to agree with me, though I'll grant you that the UK patient info sheets say otherwise (with a generic warning about all CNS meds and alcohol).

Alexis
02-03-09, 12:38 PM
although these drugs are supposed by most doctors to be interchangeable, they are not
for instance I was changed from Equasium to Concerta when my GP started prescribing without her consulting me, reading the BNF (British National Formulary) she probably believed that 36mg Concerta is the same as 30mg Equasium in terms of it's actual delivery of Methylphenidate which on paper is the case
However the experience does not agree with this nor does some scientific thought click below
http://www.cbg-meb.nl/CBG/en/human-m...le/default.htm (http://www.cbg-meb.nl/CBG/en/human-medicines/actueel/2007-02-09-methylphenidate-equasym-interchangable/default.htm)
The release mechanisms are different as is the overall chemical make up, I have also experienced significant differences in Methylphenidate IR brands specifically in terms of effectiveness probably due to the Hydrochloride part of the medication which is used to stabilize and contain the methylphenidate (making Methylphenidate Hydrochloride)

I think controlled release medications as indicated above are not interchangeable and will interact differently with the already complex chemistry of each individual, from what I have read here and through my own experience I think Concerta is an incredibly effective and well developed Methylphenidate release system but in mine and some other peoples experience it makes drinking alcohol into a sometimes hideous and unpleasant experience which as I've already said I avoid by not drinking alcohol during its therapeutic phase opting instead for equasium or IR methylphenidate, which the patient information sheet warns me against but my experience can happily ignore.

In any case I don't think there is any great danger from combining Concerta and alcohol I just don't think it's very nice

It's the pharmacists and drug companies that are suggesting you should consider your drinking habits I think and I think that is what you are reacting to, you don't have to do what they say no more than you have to look both ways when you cross the road. In general I would suggest that alcohol use is far more dangerous than we think and that we are just cultural unable to appreciate the risk it presents and the damage it can cause. In <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comhttp://www.addforums.com/forums/ /><st1:country-region w:st=England</ST1:place</st1:country-region> I would equate it to an epidemic, if any other substance caused the same amount of public expense and individual suffering it would never be licensed. overall in balance and in the long term it's not a lot of fun, whereas Methylphenidate is a useful and therapeutic medication that improves peoples lives.
I would strongly advise anyone who wants a happy and fulfilled existence to avoid alcohol whether they're on medication or not however we are all only human and as such we actually have a lot less control over our own behaviors than we think.
sometimes when we are defending our irrational choices it is because we need people to validate them and tell us that it is ok to do things we know are illogical. In reality all the answers we need are available to us through a process of intellect and the ability to subjectively process information.
But we are not rational and our lives are driven by other more exiting forces which is absolutely ok but we should perhaps be grateful to all the squares who ultimately only want us to be safe and happy (bless them)
Now put your toys away and tidy up your room and have you done your homework yet?
Sorry I can be incredibly patronizing, It's the ADHD (Hm), that and because I think I know everything and I forget to try and be polite, and I just go on and on and on, I’m working on it.
Kind Regards Alexis

fxfake
02-03-09, 01:46 PM
In general I would suggest that alcohol use is far more dangerous than we think and that we are just cultural unable to appreciate the risk it presents and the damage it can cause.

You'll get no argument from me on that. Alcohol can be an evil and insidious drug. Its addictiveness, tendency to make people do dangerous things, and easy and legal availability make it very dangerous as threat to public health.

That's not to say that most people don't use it responsibly.

whereas Methylphenidate is a useful and therapeutic medication that improves peoples lives.
I would strongly advise anyone who wants a happy and fulfilled existence to avoid alcohol whether they're on medication or not however we are all only human and as such we actually have a lot less control over our own behaviors than we think.
sometimes when we are defending our irrational choices it is because we need people to validate them and tell us that it is ok to do things we know are illogical.

I would not advise people to avoid alcohol (unless they've had past problems with it); at low doses it can be good for ones health, and, more importantly, many people enjoy the taste of a fine beer or wine. I would not say that people who have one drink at night are making an irrational choice; it's a choice that needs no defense.

To each his/her own.