View Full Version : Is indifference depression?


acdc01
10-30-14, 08:59 AM
I usually feel indifferent. Is indifference depression?

My life is very much not on track. Never married and just turned 40. Only 1 friend who is super nice but I don't really feel shares the same interests as me. Job is secure at the moment but it's not right for me and I have the hardest time trying to get myself to apply for jobs.

I rarely ever feel "happy". But I don't usually feel sad either. Although I've been having tremendous ups and downs at work and the downs do get me down sometimes.

daveddd
10-30-14, 09:24 AM
Some say it is. But depression treatment usually doesn't work for it

Some think indifference is a defense against depression or anxiety or shame

Corina86
10-31-14, 04:44 AM
It can be depression; it can be that you have no reason to be thrilled about anything right now. Some people are naturally emotional over things, others are harder to budge. It depends how you feel about it; if you think something is wrong, it usually is. Do you still enjoy the things you used to like in the past? If yes, maybe you're just bored. If not, it can be a sign of depression.

acdc01
10-31-14, 05:07 AM
Thanks guys.

I like the defense against anxiety idea. I think that's probably what it is for me.

By indifference I don't mean not interested in anything. I'm still very interested in many things. I mean I don't think I'm "happy" overall but I don't think I'm overall sad either.

I think I should be depressed though given where I am in life at my age. I guess I always say you're never too old but it's really easier to tell others that than apply that to yourself. Maybe I'm hitting a midlife crisis.

Fuzzy12
10-31-14, 07:02 AM
It could be but doesn't have to be. I don't think that it's necessarily depression just because your life circumstances aren't great at the moment. Dissatisfaction isn't the same depression. Maybe you are primarily stressed, bored or tired?

I'd recommend trying to deal with your stressors and finding something that you can be really passionate about. You know, something that gives you a reason to get out of bed every day.

sarahsweets
11-02-14, 08:24 AM
It also sounds like dysphoria.

Pilgrim
11-03-14, 07:15 AM
Maybe it's your way of saying to yourself that it's time to do something more than what you have.
I feel this to, and it is anxiety, and I think it's something that will take mental effort.
Before taking medication I think it was present then but I had other things that would require attention first.
Now I am looking to see if I can identify what and where it is.
Sometimes I for to get away from all my feelings.

dvdnvwls
11-03-14, 07:52 AM
acdc01: With depression, the good things in your life don't ever feel good anymore. (While you're still depressed, that is.)

Your description sounds to me more like a person who is not satisfied, not happy, who wants (and/or needs) to change something, and that when you do something that's good for your situation you'll probably enjoy the result - proving that you're technically not depressed, even though right now you aren't feeling quite right.

BellaVita
11-03-14, 07:56 AM
Thanks guys.

I like the defense against anxiety idea. I think that's probably what it is for me.

By indifference I don't mean not interested in anything. I'm still very interested in many things. I mean I don't think I'm "happy" overall but I don't think I'm overall sad either.

I think I should be depressed though given where I am in life at my age. I guess I always say you're never too old but it's really easier to tell others that than apply that to yourself. Maybe I'm hitting a midlife crisis.

It could be low-grade depression.

I've been diagnosed with it before, and it sounds somewhat similar to what you're experiencing.

Google it if you get the chance.

It's often not noticed because the patient themselves don't even notice it.

BellaVita
11-03-14, 07:57 AM
acdc01: With depression, the good things in your life don't ever feel good anymore. (While you're still depressed, that is.)

Your description sounds to me more like a person who is not satisfied, not happy, who wants (and/or needs) to change something, and that when you do something that's good for your situation you'll probably enjoy the result - proving that you're technically not depressed, even though right now you aren't feeling quite right.

That's almost a description of low-grade depression.

Not satisfied.

Doing things but not gaining satisfaction.

TygerSan
11-03-14, 09:04 AM
I think it is worth pointing out that some people don't experience depression as sadness, really. For them it's more of a complete numbing/inability to feel emotions. That includes positive emotions, yes, but also sometimes negative as well.

There is also a disorder called dysthymia, which is essentially low-grade chronic depression that doesn't ever really relent.

So, yeah, indifference can be a sign of depression.

Also wanted to add that just because your life situation may not be great doesn't mean that you can't be depressed, or get help for that dissatisfaction.

A lot of workplaces in the US have employee assistance programs, which provide free counseling to employees dealing with work stress and other issues. It's confidential and often times free or vastly reduced in price.

someothertime
11-03-14, 09:13 AM
worth noting i think that the majority of us experience these ongoing emotions.... well.... intermittently ( moment by moement )

i've noticed a relatively huge decline in any personal whatnots after say 30... i guess part of it is recline/recluse/avoid.... but i think overall it's more of a physical thing... in that so much of our "stides" are externally generated..... and transient....

were often left i feel.... in lulls where there is so much negative space that we naturally turn within... and ask these sorts of questions....... and naturally seem totally void.....

so perhaps........ perhaps....... indifference is not the most acurate word..... for me it implies a discerning choice or emotional baseline regarding certain things......

acdc01
11-06-14, 03:58 PM
Thanks for the replies everyone. I don't think I have dysphoria after reading about it.

I'm realizing I probably did have low grade depression a long time ago when I was living in another state. But I'm leaning toward it just being anxiety at this time.

I kind of wonder if I expect too much in terms of happiness. I think of happiness as being satisfied with where I am in life and experiencing euphoria on a number of occasions. Is that what happiness is?

Like when I was a kid, we would play basketball obsessively, then switch to video games obsessively after we got bored with basketball, and then onto another sport, then back to basketball. Actually I did that in my 20s with roommates too and our activities were always a blast.

Now my consistent activities are swimming, playing on the internet, movies, a fix-it of the month kind of hobby - basically stuff that is interesting but doesn't leave me feeling euphoric. Playing an instrument/singing/listening to music makes me feel at peace but not necessarily "happy". Only high adrenaline activities during vacations really give me the euphoric feeling anymore but unfortunately, I can't be on vacation all the time.

I kind of wonder if this decrease in happiness just happens with all adults after life responsibilities reduce the amount of fun activities they do. My guess is I have still have less happiness than most due to my circumstances but I'm just not sure if it constitutes low grade depression. I'm really got to fix my situation. Unfortunately, I tell myself this all the time and I never get around to doing it - just get busy with my next fix-it hobby that is interesting but doesn't leave me feeling truly happy.

TheDreamer
11-07-14, 05:24 AM
Thanks for the replies everyone. I don't think I have dysphoria after reading about it.

I'm realizing I probably did have low grade depression a long time ago when I was living in another state. But I'm leaning toward it just being anxiety at this time.

I kind of wonder if I expect too much in terms of happiness. I think of happiness as being satisfied with where I am in life and experiencing euphoria on a number of occasions. Is that what happiness is?

Like when I was a kid, we would play basketball obsessively, then switch to video games obsessively after we got bored with basketball, and then onto another sport, then back to basketball. Actually I did that in my 20s with roommates too and our activities were always a blast.

Now my consistent activities are swimming, playing on the internet, movies, a fix-it of the month kind of hobby - basically stuff that is interesting but doesn't leave me feeling euphoric. Playing an instrument/singing/listening to music makes me feel at peace but not necessarily "happy". Only high adrenaline activities during vacations really give me the euphoric feeling anymore but unfortunately, I can't be on vacation all the time.

I kind of wonder if this decrease in happiness just happens with all adults after life responsibilities reduce the amount of fun activities they do. My guess is I have still have less happiness than most due to my circumstances but I'm just not sure if it constitutes low grade depression. I'm really got to fix my situation. Unfortunately, I tell myself this all the time and I never get around to doing it - just get busy with my next fix-it hobby that is interesting but doesn't leave me feeling truly happy.

Interesting points. I'm also hoping for euphoria but seldom experience it. On our last company trip we went mountain biking for half a day. Really tough terrain, and I've never sat on a mountain bike before. Afterwards I would say that I felt euphoric, for several hours.

When I was younger it was enough to listen to music or watching movies to feel euphoric. I think it can also be connected to how much imagination one has, if music or movies can trigger that.

In my case I think I've had low-grade depression for a long while. I think real life early on kind of got in the way of how I perceived the world to work, and that left me confused with depression following.

LordranBound
11-07-14, 08:45 AM
Sounds like you're fine to me, really.

I think it's a much bigger issue when the things that you're usually interested in don't interest you anymore. I have that every now and again and it can be really really tough. The escapes and recharges that usually work don't and you're left wondering what to do.