View Full Version : OCD thoughts always negative??


Greyhound1
11-02-14, 09:50 PM
When I was a kid I would have OCD thoughts over only fun and exciting things. It was usually related to a hobby or interest.

Once I became an adult they changed. All of my OCD thoughts now, revolve around anxiety and stress.

It feels like my ADHD is constantly seeking out stimulation. Once it finds a stimulating topic or event it gets locked on. It starts as hyperfocus and if stimulating enough, OCD thoughts begin.

Now it seems my mind only finds negative and worrisome things to obsess over. How does one change what their mind finds stimulating?

Tinatheawesome
11-03-14, 04:10 AM
Jokes

BellaVita
11-03-14, 04:28 AM
That's a difficult question.

It may be that you need better treatment for your OCD.

When I'm on Clonazepam, my OCD thoughts aren't *as* negative and I get some happy obsessive OCD thoughts. (Like listening to same David Archuleta concerts over and over or obsessed with reading about the breeds my puppy has in her)

When I'm off Clonazepam, scary intrusive thoughts and images overwhelm me, and my OCD becomes extremely negative.....

Maybe you are depressed (low-grade depression can be difficult to spot) causing more negative OCD thoughts?

Our OCD will latch onto anything and run with it.....

eclectic beagle
11-04-14, 12:58 AM
I find what helps those ocd negative thoughts is getting immersed in a project, but I can't even use that coping mechanism if there is a very daunting task ahead of me. Especially if it's a novel social experience.

chaotic mind
11-14-14, 02:25 PM
Groundhog1, I never lost that. I'm 46 and I still obsess over whatever activity I currently find fun. The down side is that I obsess about it when I should be thinking about work or spending time with my family etc. Plus its always changing, so its gets expensive.
What I actually obsess about is how I'll be so in the flow of whatever new cool thing I'm doing, it will lead to true "satisfaction". As if I'll be content finally. Of course that never happens.
Maybe to bring it back can you try and remember something you used to do that allowed you to be completely in the moment or in the flow? Then allow yourself to get back into that. Maybe it will trigger your fun-based OCD again.

Little Missy
11-14-14, 07:54 PM
haha, I just read that and began singing, "Groundhog1 to Major Tom..."

fracturedstory
11-15-14, 10:25 PM
Happy OCD sounds like autism to me. Well, that's how I relate to it. I never think of my intense interests as OCD, but basically how I've always been.

Greyhound1
11-16-14, 02:19 AM
Happy OCD sounds like autism to me. Well, that's how I relate to it. I never think of my intense interests as OCD, but basically how I've always been.

Happy OCD isn't necessarily happy but more of an infactuation or an obsession.
I spent years infactuated, obsessing, ruminating/hyper focusing about playing basketball, it was my passion. It was probably the only way I could have stayed awake during class in H.S. My thoughts would control and entertain me and completely tune out the discussion in the class.

My brain will obsess over any extremely stimulating event whether it's happy or sad, fun or not. It just seems to never find anything fun to OCD over with so many distressing things.

fracturedstory
11-16-14, 03:03 AM
Happy OCD isn't necessarily happy but more of an infactuation or an obsession.
I spent years infactuated, obsessing, ruminating/hyper focusing about playing basketball, it was my passion. It was probably the only way I could have stayed awake during class in H.S. My thoughts would control and entertain me and completely tune out the discussion in the class.

My brain will obsess over any extremely stimulating event whether it's happy or sad, fun or not. It just seems to never find anything fun to OCD over with so many distressing things.

Yeah, I didn't mean 'happy' literally.

Autism special interests (or to us just interests) are that level of obsessive.