View Full Version : Newly diagnosed with ADD, postpartum depression and anxiety. Currently breastfeeding.


DesertGirl13
11-06-14, 06:04 PM
I need advice from moms who understand! I finally saw a therapist for my depression and anxiety and came to realize that I have ADD. This was about 3 months ago and was advised to wean my baby so that I could begin taking medications. Since then I have sunk deeper and deeper into depression and my efforts to wean seem to have made my baby want to continue BFing even more. He is a year old now, and eats solids well and takes a sippy with water no problem. However he no longer accepts a bottle or formula, making it even more difficult for my husband to help me. He is not a patient person and pretty much can't handle a crying child. I have no support, yet my family and husband keep asking me when I am going to wean. Especially now that I have my diagnosis and am so down with depression and anxiety. This is the problem, I can't seem to take action on a damn thing around me, let alone wean my child from something he seems to need and I really don't mind giving him. I just wish I could get him to stop nursing through the night, as this is making my already bad sleep habits even worse. I know this lack of sleep. 2-4 hrs a night is my normal, is making all my symptoms worse. The problem is, I know if I nurse and attend to him he won't cry. This keeps my husband and other child from waking and keeps my anxiety about them waking up at bay. It's a vicious cycle that I can't get out of. I need help but can't seem to ask. My self esteem is so low I have a very hard time feeling worthy of asking, accepting or allowing it. Does this make sense to anyone else? If so, what is the first step to breaking this cycle? I so desperately need help. Thank you ahead of time for any input you may have for me.

Flia
11-07-14, 08:31 AM
Experienced mothers know how to wean and have the patience to do it.
Could you ask for help from someone like that?

BadBrains81
11-29-14, 07:36 AM
I need advice from moms who understand! I finally saw a therapist for my depression and anxiety and came to realize that I have ADD. This was about 3 months ago and was advised to wean my baby so that I could begin taking medications. Since then I have sunk deeper and deeper into depression and my efforts to wean seem to have made my baby want to continue BFing even more. He is a year old now, and eats solids well and takes a sippy with water no problem. However he no longer accepts a bottle or formula, making it even more difficult for my husband to help me. He is not a patient person and pretty much can't handle a crying child. I have no support, yet my family and husband keep asking me when I am going to wean. Especially now that I have my diagnosis and am so down with depression and anxiety. This is the problem, I can't seem to take action on a damn thing around me, let alone wean my child from something he seems to need and I really don't mind giving him. I just wish I could get him to stop nursing through the night, as this is making my already bad sleep habits even worse. I know this lack of sleep. 2-4 hrs a night is my normal, is making all my symptoms worse. The problem is, I know if I nurse and attend to him he won't cry. This keeps my husband and other child from waking and keeps my anxiety about them waking up at bay. It's a vicious cycle that I can't get out of. I need help but can't seem to ask. My self esteem is so low I have a very hard time feeling worthy of asking, accepting or allowing it. Does this make sense to anyone else? If so, what is the first step to breaking this cycle? I so desperately need help. Thank you ahead of time for any input you may have for me.
Hi..I recognize so much of what you going through :( your post has touched me.Is very heavy phase in your life certainly endured with depression and anxiety(i'am/was battling the same fight) without the support and understanding.Talk to a doctor/health care provider about what to expect when stop nursing a baby at night.Cutting out night feedings can regulate hormones more effectively than cutting out feedings at any other time of the day. Your doctor can advise you of what to expect physically and emotionally, as well as any effects it may have on your baby.Speak to experienced parents. Seek advice and tips from them. Most parents will be happy to share the successes they experienced when weaning their baby.
Knowing what to expect can help you prepare for any difficult situations that may arise.Decide how you will handle obstacles if and when they occur. Brainstorm about different ways to combat obstacles and find a solution to various situations that might occur. Having a plan in place prior to weaning will prevent you from scrambling for a solution if and when an unwanted situation does occur.

Method: Go Slow

1 Slowly incorporate a bottle into your babyís routine. Start with a daytime bottle feeding. Your baby may be very resistant to taking a bottle at first, but be persistent and keep offering it to him each day.

2 Be persistent with your attempts throughout the day. Donít ever force a bottle on your baby. Just offer it to him several times throughout the day to allow your baby to slowly grow accustomed to the change.

3 Refrain from forcing your baby to drink an entire bottle. A sip here and there will eventually lead to more and more sips, until he is drinking an entire bottle.

4 Give your baby a familiar taste. Entice your baby with the familiar taste of breast milk in the bottle if he is very resistant, rather than trying to switch to a formula. The point is to get your baby accustomed to the nipple and the suction differences that a bottle offers. Hold off on attempting to offer formula to your baby for a bit longer. After your baby has mastered the switch from breast to bottle, try offering formula in the same manner you tried offering the breast milk bottle.

5 Don't give your baby a nighttime bottle too soon. Wait until your baby is a master at the bottle before trying to incorporate it into night feedings. Keep in mind that it is not just the bottle that your baby wants during the night; it is the comfort and security that mom can offer through breast feeding.

Feed your baby solid food. Try filling your babyís tummy up with solid food later in the evening to help prevent him from waking in the middle of the night due to hunger.
Enlist dad's help. Allow dad to offer your baby the bottle for night feedings to break the usual bond that occurs with mom and breast feeding throughout the night. Let your baby sleep with dad at night until he becomes accustomed to not having the breast every night. As a mother, you may have to remove yourself from the room for a while until your baby adjusts to the new bedtime routine.
Incorporate a pacifier into nightly attempts to nurse. Often, it is the sucking motion that your baby is craving and not so much the milk flow that occurs from nursing. Many babies like to just use the breast as a pacifier.

I wish you the best.

BadBrains81
11-29-14, 08:23 AM
It's a vicious cycle that I can't get out of. I need help but can't seem to ask. My self esteem is so low I have a very hard time feeling worthy of asking, accepting or allowing it. Does this make sense to anyone else? If so, what is the first step to breaking this cycle? I so desperately need help. Thank you ahead of time for any input you may have for me.
It makes alot of sense to me... Sometimes you just need someone to talk to who will understand what you are going through. Speaking about your problems really help to alleviate some of the weight put on your shoulders. After having a baby, many things change and it is okay to share your feelings of stress and concern.

AeonOFTherion
12-03-14, 02:50 AM
Oh damn I was just in your EXACT POSITION back in April of this year when I was diagnosed with ADHD Combined Type, yep turns out I've been a life long sufferer certainly explains all of my failures. It took about 5 to 10 trips to the Pediatrician and BF consultant until my daughter started to finally bottlefeed with formula. Gerber Good Start tastes the most like breastmilk and there are a number of methods you can try to coerce the baby and they work with some persistence. Coat the nipple in sugar is one option, put a teaspoon of sugar in the bottle, or you can coat the bottom of the bottle with Karo syrup alone or you can add a little sugar to the Karo syrup but I would use the Karo syrup sparingly because it can cause your baby to poop more often. The reason I used sugar to coerce my baby to drink formula is because obviously breastmilk to infants is much sweeter than formula and no she's not obese and it does not hurt them. Trust me if you are desperate enough you will try anything. I have no support from family, zero friends, and my husband works all the time..its just me and my children and yes it gets depressing, lonely, and isolating. You begin to feel like the senior citizen whose kids hasn't come to visit for awhile and when you people call you regardless of who they are (the bank, bill collectors, customer service reps) you will initiate convos with them to negate losing your mind from being by yourself or around just kids for too long. I don't get sad about not having support anymore, I am so used to being alone, I've become withdrawn and no it does not bring me sadness but it does **** me off whenever a relative calls me up and says they are coming over and they are a no show or if I ask my mom or grandma to come over for a few hours to give me a much needed break and they don't show then that really ****** me off. I find myself becoming more overwhelmed than anything that I have to do so much on my own that most of the time I feel like a single parent. Sometimes you have to be just be thankful for what you got, others have way worse than you do. I have 3 KIDS UNDER 5 and now my son is exhibiting signs of ADHD with Oppositional Defiance Disorder. My husband is not patient or supportive at all..he's demanding, obsessive compulsive about cleaning, and that is exactly what he expects me to do all day..CLEAN...I get so ******* tired of cleaning I find myself suppressing the urge to douse the house with gasoline and set it on fire.