View Full Version : Anyone else feel like nothing is real?


midnightstar
11-10-14, 07:43 AM
Does anyone else feel like everything we know or think we know in this world is just something imagined by someone else who none of us can see? Or am I a weird freak? :eyebrow:

TygerSan
11-10-14, 08:41 AM
I'm sorry midnight. That's truly frightening. That's how I felt the one and only time I've ever been high. It scared the crap out of me and if I hadn't realized I had some control over the feeling, it wouldn't have ended well.

Sometimes when I'm really anxious, I kind of dissociate, and it seems like I'm observing myself/hearing myself speak from the outside which just adds to the feeling that things aren't quite real.

stef
11-10-14, 08:44 AM
Sometimes when I'm really anxious, I kind of dissociate, and it seems like I'm observing myself/hearing myself speak from the outside which just adds to the feeling that things aren't quite real.

This happens to me too! Very unpleasant.

Corina86
11-10-14, 09:48 AM
Does anyone else feel like everything we know or think we know in this world is just something imagined by someone else who none of us can see? Or am I a weird freak? :eyebrow:

I think this is also a Hindu belief: that the world is an illusion, a dream of Brahma. I thought about it and so have others: what if the world is a computer game for someone to play and we're all supporting characters? Or a cartoon mean to entertain some watchers? Or an experiment? The thing is that, even if it's true, there's nothing you can do about it.

midnightstar
11-10-14, 02:59 PM
I think this is also a Hindu belief: that the world is an illusion, a dream of Brahma. I thought about it and so have others: what if the world is a computer game for someone to play and we're all supporting characters? Or a cartoon mean to entertain some watchers? Or an experiment? The thing is that, even if it's true, there's nothing you can do about it.

It's as scary as crap when I get that feeling, makes me get paranoid because if that belief is true we're getting watched at all times including when we're on the loo :eyebrow::eek:

Little Missy
11-10-14, 05:30 PM
Nah, nobody wants to see us in the loo. You gotta trust me on this one. :)

midnightstar
11-10-14, 05:55 PM
Nah, nobody wants to see us in the loo. You gotta trust me on this one. :)

Can we be absolutely certain that no one is watching us on the loo or in the bath :eek::eyebrow:

Rebelyell
11-10-14, 07:21 PM
Been thru that after my mom died , can't remember the term.for it off hand.

midnightstar
11-10-14, 07:29 PM
What if someone wrote this world as a story like the fictional places we read about in books :eek:

TygerSan
11-10-14, 08:47 PM
When I was a kid, I'd stare at the blank TV and see myself reflected back. I thought briefly how weird it would be if there was a director who was making a TV show out of everyone's every day lives. . . and then I thought of how boring that would be.

I'm pretty confident that even if someone did create the world we're living in; even if we are characters in a fictionalized book, the creator probably got bored with his creation and went to get a sandwich or something.

Weirdly, the idea of the being that created our universe watching me doesn't really bug me the way a person doing the same thing would :scratch:

If anything, I like imagining we're little specks on a universe like little fleas on the back of a dog. The dog barely even knows we're there.

Honestly, I prefer the reality in which there is no creator at all. We are not a product of a plot, just the product of a confluence of random events giving rise to life. And as such, I can guarantee that a random confluence of events is not watching us shower.

InvitroCanibal
11-11-14, 03:24 AM
Yes, all the time. It's called depersonalization. It happens quite a bit in anxiety disorders and can also be a form of depression. Hope this helps.

Here is wikipedia's definition on it.

Depersonalization (or depersonalisation) is an anomaly of self-awareness. It consists of a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation.<sup id="cite_ref-DSM-IV-TR_1-0" class="reference">[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-DSM-IV-TR-1)</sup> Subjects feel they have changed, and the world has become vague, dreamlike, less real, or lacking in significance. It can be a disturbing experience, since many feel that, indeed, they are living in a "dream". Chronic depersonalization refers to depersonalization disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization_disorder), which is classified by the DSM-IV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSM-IV) as a dissociative disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder).
Though degrees of depersonalization and derealization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derealization) can happen to anyone who is subject to temporary anxiety/stress, chronic depersonalization is more related to individuals who have experienced a severe trauma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_trauma) or prolonged stress/anxiety. Depersonalization-derealization is the single most important symptom in the spectrum of dissociative disorders, including dissociative identity disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_identity_disorder) and "dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder_not_otherwise_specified)" (DD-NOS). It is also a prominent symptom in some other non-dissociative disorders, such as anxiety disorders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety_disorder), clinical depression (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression), bipolar disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder), schizophrenia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizophrenia),<sup id="cite_ref-pmid23454432_2-0" class="reference">[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-pmid23454432-2)</sup> borderline personality disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borderline_personality_disorder), obsessive-compulsive disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive-compulsive_disorder), migraine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migraine) and sleep deprivation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_deprivation), and it can be a symptom of some types of neurological seizure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seizure). It can be considered desirable, such as in the use of recreational drugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreational_drugs).

Corina86
11-11-14, 04:33 AM
It's as scary as crap when I get that feeling, makes me get paranoid because if that belief is true we're getting watched at all times including when we're on the loo :eyebrow::eek:

Pretty much all religions have some sort of deity/deities/spirits/ghosts or other supernatural beings that have the ability to walk among us invisible and undetected and know everything we do- if they get to watch everyone on the loo, why would it be a problem that they are watching you? It's not like you're doing something special that nobody has ever done before... And those beings probably saw so many things, that nothing shocks them anymore.

Off-topic: my nieces like to go the bathroom together; it's a bonding thing for them and they don't understand why adults hate it :)

stef
11-11-14, 04:36 AM
Been thru that after my mom died , can't remember the term.for it off hand.

isn't it awful? :grouphug:
I had whole parts of days like this when I was back. Thank god my friend invited me to stay at her place. i see now that she was purposely taking care of me, beyond just having me stay over.

Fuzzy12
11-11-14, 06:31 AM
I'm not sure I actually feel that way but it's something I've always wondered about a lot, what is real and how can we ever know for sure. The more I thought about it the more everything started feeling unreal and questionable. It used to bother me a lot, especially when I was depressed.

midnightstar
11-11-14, 07:35 AM
Yes, all the time. It's called depersonalization. It happens quite a bit in anxiety disorders and can also be a form of depression. Hope this helps.

Here is wikipedia's definition on it.

Depersonalization (or depersonalisation) is an anomaly of self-awareness. It consists of a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation.<sup id="cite_ref-DSM-IV-TR_1-0" class="reference">[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-DSM-IV-TR-1)</sup> Subjects feel they have changed, and the world has become vague, dreamlike, less real, or lacking in significance. It can be a disturbing experience, since many feel that, indeed, they are living in a "dream". Chronic depersonalization refers to depersonalization disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization_disorder), which is classified by the DSM-IV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSM-IV) as a dissociative disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder).
Though degrees of depersonalization and derealization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derealization) can happen to anyone who is subject to temporary anxiety/stress, chronic depersonalization is more related to individuals who have experienced a severe trauma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_trauma) or prolonged stress/anxiety. Depersonalization-derealization is the single most important symptom in the spectrum of dissociative disorders, including dissociative identity disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_identity_disorder) and "dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder_not_otherwise_specified)" (DD-NOS). It is also a prominent symptom in some other non-dissociative disorders, such as anxiety disorders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety_disorder), clinical depression (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression), bipolar disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder), schizophrenia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizophrenia),<sup id="cite_ref-pmid23454432_2-0" class="reference">[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-pmid23454432-2)</sup> borderline personality disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borderline_personality_disorder), obsessive-compulsive disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive-compulsive_disorder), migraine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migraine) and sleep deprivation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_deprivation), and it can be a symptom of some types of neurological seizure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seizure). It can be considered desirable, such as in the use of recreational drugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreational_drugs).

Thanks invitro, I'm going to see if there's a book in the library about it because I personally don't trust wikifail because anyone can edit it - someone could even edit that definition to mean a great big fart or something :eyebrow: that's how ridiculous wikifail is :grouphug:

TygerSan
11-11-14, 07:55 AM
Midnight, try the references ( numbers in brackets) on the Wiki article. They should bring you to the original sources.

As someone who's take a bunch of psych courses, the definition is not unreasonable. There is another definition of depersonalization, though, that doesn't have to do with anxiety, so don't get too confused.

midnightstar
11-11-14, 08:09 AM
Midnight, try the references ( numbers in brackets) on the Wiki article. They should bring you to the original sources.

As someone who's take a bunch of psych courses, the definition is not unreasonable. There is another definition of depersonalization, though, that doesn't have to do with anxiety, so don't get too confused.

What's the other definition Tyger? :grouphug:

I don't understand the sources on the wikifail page, they just look like a random string of random letters and characters shoved together like someone threw a full scrabble board across the room :eyebrow:

Maybe I'm being thick but I don't get them at all :eyebrow:

TygerSan
11-11-14, 08:47 AM
If you click on the little tiny numbers that appear at the end of phrases, that should bring you to a link to an article that the person writing the wiki article used to write the wiki.

I've seen some people use depersonalization as a synonym for deindividuation, which is what happens when you become a part of a large group or mob and your individual identity gets lost, temporarily, in the process.

Rebelyell
11-11-14, 10:01 AM
De personalization/De realization

midnightstar
11-11-14, 01:37 PM
If you click on the little tiny numbers that appear at the end of phrases, that should bring you to a link to an article that the person writing the wiki article used to write the wiki.

I've seen some people use depersonalization as a synonym for deindividuation, which is what happens when you become a part of a large group or mob and your individual identity gets lost, temporarily, in the process.

I clicked on them but they make exactly no sense to me, maybe I'm stupid :eyebrow:

daveddd
11-11-14, 01:50 PM
I clicked on them but they make exactly no sense to me, maybe I'm stupid :eyebrow:

It's fairly accurate. Depersonalization somewhat of a defense against overwhelming feeling

It can be several different emotions that trigger it

vpilar
11-11-14, 03:25 PM
Does anyone else feel like everything we know or think we know in this world is just something imagined by someone else who none of us can see? Or am I a weird freak? :eyebrow:

hahahah I unfortunately don't feel that way, but I like the idea :)
...And there is literture on it in philosophy as well...Whatever goes under the different kinds of "idealism" approaches in philosophy could be similar with what you'r saying... An extreme classic example is "George Berkeley" (1685-1753). His famous quote is "esse est percipi" meaning that "to be is to perceive". He claimed that all material objects are only 'ideas' in the mind of a perceiver, so for example a chair does not exist outside of our perception!
If I remember correctly, in response to the critiques, he then developed his idea a bit milder by saying that all matters are the ideas which are always present in GOD's perception. :)

vpilar
11-11-14, 03:47 PM
Yes, all the time. It's called depersonalization. It happens quite a bit in anxiety disorders and can also be a form of depression. Hope this helps.

Here is wikipedia's definition on it.

Depersonalization (or depersonalisation) is an anomaly of self-awareness. It consists of a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation.<sup id="cite_ref-DSM-IV-TR_1-0" class="reference">[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-DSM-IV-TR-1)</sup> Subjects feel they have changed, and the world has become vague, dreamlike, less real, or lacking in significance. It can be a disturbing experience, since many feel that, indeed, they are living in a "dream". Chronic depersonalization refers to depersonalization disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization_disorder), which is classified by the DSM-IV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSM-IV) as a dissociative disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder).
Though degrees of depersonalization and derealization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derealization) can happen to anyone who is subject to temporary anxiety/stress, chronic depersonalization is more related to individuals who have experienced a severe trauma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_trauma) or prolonged stress/anxiety. Depersonalization-derealization is the single most important symptom in the spectrum of dissociative disorders, including dissociative identity disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_identity_disorder) and "dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociative_disorder_not_otherwise_specified)" (DD-NOS). It is also a prominent symptom in some other non-dissociative disorders, such as anxiety disorders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety_disorder), clinical depression (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression), bipolar disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder), schizophrenia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizophrenia),<sup id="cite_ref-pmid23454432_2-0" class="reference">[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depersonalization#cite_note-pmid23454432-2)</sup> borderline personality disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borderline_personality_disorder), obsessive-compulsive disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive-compulsive_disorder), migraine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migraine) and sleep deprivation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_deprivation), and it can be a symptom of some types of neurological seizure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seizure). It can be considered desirable, such as in the use of recreational drugs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreational_drugs).

Oh! Thanks a lot for this! Now I think I should get myself checked out ;)
I've been always amazed by how there seems to be always a "mental disorder label" which can be associated with one of the classical approaches in philosophy :) ...As a person whose main passion is philosophy (although it's not my focus now) I see myself qualified for many of these kinds of labels! :cool:

....I'd just like to mention that we need to be very carful in associating psychological labels to ourselves! Human mind is so complicated and there are huge individual differences .... Only by thinking about some stuff, even if they affect our daily life and life style... we can't say we have a mental problem which needs to be treated....