View Full Version : A tale of two schools


Canucks1
11-12-14, 06:12 PM
Hi everyone.

Let me give you a short back story.
My almost 6 year old boy is at a Montessori school and has been for almost a year. We changed him from a conventional school because he was causing a lot of grief for the teacher and the school said they couldn't handle him.
He would completely ignore the teacher, close off, not do his work and was falling behind. He is a very smart lad wise beyond his years. Everyone comments how he is like a little adult and he relates to adults far better than to kids his own age. and adults love him (although he is also popular with his classmates)

Anyways he was learning at that school, all be it by force. He hated school and was unhappy most days so we changed him to a Montessori school. Now he is happy at school but he is not learning anything. The teacher said it is like he blocks out everything they say and his answer is "no" to everything. He is in his own world. And the only way he will do anything is when a teacher sits with him. And then results are varied. But at the Montessori school they told us that there are no consequences so it's a bit of a free for all. It seems to be a huge motivation issue. We are seeing a child therapist and we are seeing much improved results at home but not at school.

Our dilemma now is what to do next. Leave him at the Montessori school, Send him to a strict conventional school (which seemed to work for me when I was young) or even home school him. Your advice is much appreciated :)

ccom5100
11-15-14, 12:27 PM
You say he is almost 6. Perhaps he's not ready for any type of school environment. The important thing is to get him interested in learning. If you are willing, I think homeschooling is the way to go, at least for a year. Find what interests him and run with it. Take lots of nature walks, go to the zoo, children's museums, try story time at the library, read to him, help him recognize words, look at bugs and leaves under a microscope, etc.

finallyfound10
11-15-14, 01:41 PM
Welcome!!

You say he is almost 6. Perhaps he's not ready for any type of school environment. The important thing is to get him interested in learning.I agree with ccom5100. I am certified teacher (also with ADHD- Inattentive and Dyscalculia- Math's Dyslexia). He may not be ready for a strict conventional learning environment- and may not ever be which I'll address in a bit.

If you can homeschool at this point with the majority of time allowing for self-directed learning which he is already doing at Montessori and some traditional direct-instruction as when the teacher sits next to him but with more structure and implementing mild consequences. I think it can work. Ex. If he doesn't recognize letter sounds yet, this needs to be worked on. "We can go to the zoo but only if you work on letter sounds for 20 minutes." (via flashcards, computer game, board game, an age-appropriate book)

A word of caution on the homeschooling, it is hard, very hard but I love that people are doing it more and the proof that it is a viable and in many cases, superior way to educate is difficult to deny. I've taught in parochial and public schools and know families who have homeschooled and been impressed.

Take lots of nature walks, go to the zoo, children's museums, try story time at the library, read to him, help him recognize words, look at bugs and leaves under a microscope, etc.Parents who homeschool younger kids need so spend a lot of time involved in their learning process by providing the opportunities as described above. If you don't have the time, then I would probably say to stick with Montessori since it is an incredibly rich environment.

I stated above that he may never be ready for a strict learning environment and that's ok. His learning style may wind up to be better suited for a Montessori-type environment for most or all of his schooling. Luckily, you recognize this already. Also, the fact that he sees a therapist is heartening since there can be this point where many kids reach, especially boys, where the teacher and the parents can't figure out if the child still is simply too emotionally/mentally immature for a structured school setting or to learn literacy and numeracy basics in a structured way OR is the child completely ready but is "lazy" and/or just wants to do what they wants to do. I think that this a where a good therapist can help figure out what is going on.

Here in the US we have Sylvan, Kumon and Huntington Learning Centers that help kids with the basics. I'm not sure if they are in Mexico though.

Good luck!!!!

Canucks1
11-16-14, 10:43 AM
Thank you both for your advice. Just this week we have got him a tutor two days per week to help him with reading and writing so here's hoping that brings him up to speed... Cheers