View Full Version : Seeking, want and drive (Split from thread "want is not drive")


mildadhd
11-27-14, 07:59 PM
SEEKING is a primary emotion. (unconditioned emotional response system)

Want is a secondary emotion. (primary emotion + experience)





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Lunacie
11-29-14, 09:42 PM
SEEKING is a primary emotion. (unconditioned emotional response system)

Want is a secondary emotion. (primary emotion + experience)





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Yes, but ... how does that relate to "want" versus "drive?"

Which of those are you saying is want and which is drive?

mildadhd
11-30-14, 02:08 PM
THE ANATOMY OF SEEKING SYSTEM



Anatomically, the trajectory of the SEEKING system runs from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) up to three main destinations: (i) the medial forebrain bundle and lateral hypothalamus (MFB-LH), (ii) up to the nucleus accumbens and (iii) to the medial prefrontal cortex via the mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine pathways.

A general summary of the anatomy is in figure 3.1.

Some of the major neurons of this system, the dopamine ones situated in the VTA, receive abundant inputs from other parts of the brain.

As we mentioned, this system also has massive outputs to several higher regions of the brain, especially the nucleus accumbens, which is a major way station for appetitive learning.

In certain "lower" mammals like rats, the ascending dopamine pathways that energize this system do not project beyond the frontal cortical regions.

In humans, however, this system reaches much further, into the sensory-perceptual cortices concentrated in the back of the brain.

This is consistent with the fact that SEEKING in humans arouses cognitive functions that do not have clear homologues in other animals.



In all mammals, the nucleus accumbens interacts with the medial frontal cortex to promote simple appetitive learning (and addictions).

Because the SEEKING system energizes the frontal neocortical regions, especially medial zones that focus on immediate emotional needs, we are able to devise strategies to obtain life's bounties and to escape its pitfalls.

When experiences are exceptionally pleasurable, we remember them, and this lays the foundations for the possibility of addiction.

As already noted, the dopamine part of this system extends further throughout the cortex in humans than it does in most other animals.

Of course, this system works in association with many other brain regions (3.1 B, C, D), including those that control general arousal (globally operating norepinephrine and serotonin systems) as well as more specific brain-attention functions such as those mediated by acetylcholine, GABA, and glutamate.

Because the SEEKING system also participates in the enactment of all the other emotions we will discuss in this book, we will not repeat such complexities in each chapter, but we think that readers will appreciate that the discussion of each system is abstracted from the larger brain complexities in which each of those systems is embedded.

No emotional system can do much without the help of the rest of the brain.



Panksepp/Biven, "The Archaeology of Mind", Chapter 3: The SEEKING system, p 104-105.






------i!i i!i i!i------




Dopaminergic pathways (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dopaminergic_pathways), sometimes called dopaminergic projections, are neural pathways in the brain that transmit the neurotransmitter dopamine from one region of the brain to another.[1][2]






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mildadhd
11-30-14, 02:24 PM
Yes, but ... how does that relate to "want" versus "drive?"

Which of those are you saying is want and which is drive?


Maybe it would be easiest, if we compare the anatomies of "want" and "drive", with the anatomy of the SEEKING system.

We know the anatomy of the SEEKING system. (See post #11 (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1701719&postcount=11))

What are the anatomies of "want" and "drive" ?



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Lunacie
11-30-14, 06:06 PM
Maybe it would be easiest, if we compare the anatomies of "want" and "drive", with the anatomy of the SEEKING system.

We know the anatomy of the SEEKING system. (See post #11 (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1701719&postcount=11))

What are the anatomies of "want" and "drive" ?



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Silly me. I was thinking you could just explain your reasoning in comparing
the seeking system with the concept posted by the OP.

tazoz
11-30-14, 06:19 PM
Moderator Note:

These posts were split from the thread: "want is not drive":

http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=167478

Please continue the discussion of seeking in relation to want and drive in this thread.

mildadhd
11-30-14, 06:49 PM
Silly me. I was thinking you could just explain your reasoning in comparing
the seeking system with the concept posted by the OP.


I was thinking the actual anatomy involved in the previous OP discussion would be considered on topic.

I am not familiar with drive theory, and was hoping that people who are more familiar with the anatomy involved in drive theory, would help me consider and compare the information with the anatomy/theory of the SEEKING system.

I will explore and compare the information in this thread.






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