View Full Version : analyzing everything -> no wonder exceptions stick out like sore thumbs!


someothertime
12-02-14, 06:34 AM
when i met with my employment lady today ( disability )... we were talking about social outlets and i mentioned i didn't have many ( forgot to mention gardening, cycling.... etc. etc. tho they are solo mostly )

it was interesting though that she said to get along to some simple courses ( barista, ping pong or whatever ) with the purpose of just going with the flow..... relating / sharing... etc.

sure, i can see how people skills / presentness / listening / social contact etc. etc. all hold great potential to bring me a fuller life... connecting that with how much i personally need and can handle ( desire vs overload ) is another story.... i've read some really good posts here on that topic and it seems it's an ongoing balancing act... though for most... some contact is definately a need in terms of wellbeing let alone the other skills.



ANYWAY... she said to me while i was sort of looking puzzled / trying to connect a desire about "just going and listening / not thinking" ->;

"You don't have to analyse everything"

Now i've been told similar things in various guises... though it wasn't until over a year ago that I learned about ACT / mindfullness that I really "got" it. And that is from a looking out ( presentness ) rather than looking in ( stop XYZ )..... I totally get on an emotional level how these aid oneself.... i think this is more about the cognitive engagement side of things...

Anyway.... Sure... Inattentive people have active minds... i guess we learn to entertain ourselves... and grow this behavior / cognitive pattern that is constantly ticking / taking in... assimilating...


Does anyone have any personal experiences... on this and similar behaviors... Do you do something else? ( not analyze... maybe something else? )...

Can anyone tie in some neurological / ADHD traits and cognitive functionings that underly or contribute to this.

stef
12-02-14, 06:53 AM
I'm not sure if this is the same thing, but I've been told that I "think too much".
I've never understood this comment and I really don't appreciate it. My apologies, for having an active mind and trying to understand my envrionment...:eyebrow:

someothertime
12-02-14, 07:04 AM
Exactly!

HXofADHD.W/F76
12-02-14, 11:40 AM
I'm going to see if I can guess a couple of things about you, it is a game, not intended to be offensive at all :-)

You are a cyclist because it helps you focus on one thing at a time which is keeping the rubber on the road and not getting hit or wrecking? Afterwards you feel VERY rejuvenated and able to think. It's different than if you went to the gym, it's much better.

Your attention to detail is distracting. You can forget how you got somewhere in a mall or recall any part of the conversation you had with the barista at the coffee shop but you can visualize in vivid detail what kind of glasses she was wearing? Or something to that sort basically :-)

Did I guess any right?

Unmanagable
12-02-14, 03:39 PM
I'm not sure if this is the same thing, but I've been told that I "think too much".
I've never understood this comment and I really don't appreciate it. My apologies, for having an active mind and trying to understand my envrionment...:eyebrow:

That's always bugged me, too. I'm told I think too much while some of the highly intelligent folks saying that tend to behave like they've long since reached their capacity and can think no more. :lol: No wonder attempted communications become so damn exhausting.

I would love to be able to better access the much needed "neutral" moments while remaining present in the heat of the moment, especially when responding to someone telling me I think too much. lol.

These same peeps accuse me of wanting to take shortcuts and not taking time to think things through when I feel certain I already have something figured out. However, when I repeatedly get the desired results, they eventually make time to pay attention to what I say. If they don't, I remind them. :)

Connecting with the breath on purpose, in every possible moment, seems to be the most successful attempt to regulate my mind flow and chatter, so far. I still try to convince myself that simply breathing is way too easy to be true or effective, but it continues to work like a charm whenever I remember to make it a point to practice it. But, then I just become even more aware and have more to think about. UGH!!!!!!!!! :lol:

sarek
12-02-14, 04:28 PM
This phenomenon is now becoming an ever bigger problem with me. For my further progress I need to be able to be more present and less " in my head " and it is an enormous struggle to achieve that.

Greyhound1
12-02-14, 04:38 PM
I'm not sure if this is the same thing, but I've been told that I "think too much".
I've never understood this comment and I really don't appreciate it. My apologies, for having an active mind and trying to understand my envrionment...:eyebrow:

I have been told this many times myself. I tend to confuse myself by overthinking and end up normally having anxiety and more questions than answers. At this point, my mind will start racing.

I know it does hinder socializing for me a lot. I am still overthinking a statement made during a conversation even after the topic has changed. This then causes anxiety and mind racing to begin.

I can also, totally bomb on a test even when I know the material inside and out. I overthink the questions and then anxiety and mind racing starts. Once this happens, I can forget everything.

I think for me, it's a trifecta of ADHD, OCD and anxiety.


:)Just thinking of the irony here. We are analyzing whether we analyze things too much. We must be guilty. :D