View Full Version : 82 page evaluation report!


michaelaisabell
12-16-14, 08:43 PM
My daughter was evaluated by a local school. Full evaluation.
I have a meeting with them on Thursday but I requested a copy of the report be emailed to me before then.

I got the report today. It's 82 pages!
And I'm a little upset that it's missing the parts about whether she qualifies for special ed services and what they will be recommending.

In this sections it just says to be discussed at MET meeting.

amber3902
12-19-14, 04:29 PM
I think it's pretty normal not to know if your child qualifies until you go to the actual meeting.

I didn't find out if my daughter qualified for special ed services until I went to the meeting. The school psychologist went through everything in the eval and then asked if the team agreed that the child qualified for special ed. Everyone agreed.

michaelaisabell
12-19-14, 04:48 PM
I think it's pretty normal not to know if your child qualifies until you go to the actual meeting.

I didn't find out if my daughter qualified for special ed services until I went to the meeting. The school psychologist went through everything in the eval and then asked if the team agreed that the child qualified for special ed. Everyone agreed.

Actually you have the right to request all info before hand.
I requested the report be sent to me prior to the meeting and they did. Usually it shows what they Are recommending but this one didn't.

But yes you are correct if you don't request info prior to the meeting the. You just go over everything when you get there.

They ended up saying my dd doesn't qualify for services . I told them I disagree and that I will be seeking an independant evaluation at the publics expense.

zette93
12-20-14, 12:10 PM
My son's district has a neuropsychologist on staff, and she gave him a full eval as part of his triennial IEP last year. The report was somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 pages, and was very similar -- strong on detail, low on recommendations. Most everything tested within the "normal" range, although there was a cluster of visual things right around the 85th percentile, which would border on being "low average". There was one test in particular (copying a complex drawing) that was at 2%, and it wasn't even mentioned in the summary. When I asked during the meeting how scoring that low in that area might affect his learning at school, she didn't have an answer.

In our case, though, the team all agreed that DS needed to be in the special needs school rather than in general ed. Since getting the district to pay for that school was our primary objective, we were satisfied. I would be very curious, though, to see what an independent evaluator would have recommended.