View Full Version : My daughter was denied special ed services


michaelaisabell
12-20-14, 09:45 PM
Here is what happened. I am sorry this is sooo long.

Also I'm sorry for over explaining some terms. This is a copy of a text a sent to my friend.

Ok so here is the short version of my long story.

Dd iq was a score of 91. But because there was more than a 23 point difference between her highest and lowest score it would have been rendered invalid. So what they do is drop her highest score so that all the others were within 23 points of eachother. Now her iq is 85 ( I feel it's much higher than that) at least average at least (100).

her academic scores all came out in the average to above average range.

Let me back up. These scores have a mean (average) of 100. 15 point in either direction is considered average. So anywhere between 85-115 is average.

Ok so this is what doesn't make sense to me. She is showing the opposite of a learning disability where her iq is testing lower than her academic preformance. How is that even possible?

Then I find out that they don't technically test for dyslexia. I was told " we don't test for dyslexia. If there is a dyslexia problem it usually shows up in the reading test"

Well dd is clearly dyslexic. She flips her letters and numbers backwards consistently. So I'm sorry but "usually" is not good enough for me.

Also, she scored in the "at risk" and "clinical" range for a few things in the rating scales.
These were
Dysthymia ( low grade chronic depression)
Adhd
Anxiety
Major depression
Somatization ( acting sick)
And autism/aspergers + oppositional defiant disorder. Those last two I'm not concerned about.

They didn't delve into these too much or even tell me I should look into it.

Apparently the school only looks for "specific learning disabilities"

So they said she does not qualify for services and I told them I disagree and asked how to go about seeking an independant eval.

Later the psycholgist called me back to find out more info. I told her that it doesn't make sense to me that she is showing the opposite of a learning disorder. I told her my daughter has been struggling in school for the last two years and working with the teacher and getting her extra help that the school has offered is not helping.

I told her I see my daughter comming home frustrated daily because she is having such a hard time. I deal with the crying, the broken pencils comming home, and the low self esteem.

I told her it doesn't make sense that your tests show her reading is normal yet her school says she is behind and the title 1 teacher says she is a while year behind.

She said that usually when kids qualify for special ed they are two years or more behind because that is considered a severe delay.

I said I'm my eyes my daughter is a full year behind and THAT IS A SEVERE DELAY!

Then she offered to do more cognitive testing ( iq tests)
I said I would think about it but later I refused it.

I told her that dd struggles so much and gets so frustrated academically and she also had social/emotional issues and I just feel that something more is going on whether it be a learning disorder or a psychological issue.

She then asked me what I thought about adhd because I scored dd really likely to have adhd on my parent adhd scale.

I told her that I honestly suspected adhd but that I was a little suprised at the teachers ratings. But I also told her that I have adhd and it wasn't diagnosed until I was an adult because even though I struggled in school I wasn't a behavior problem and while I was in class I was able to sit there and pretend to be listening when really I was just smiling and nodding but my mind was elsewhere.
She said that happens a lot with children who are adhd but not hyperactive.

So now I'm going to write a letter to the school asking for an independent evaluation at the publics expense.

They can choose to cover it or deny it and there will be a hearing.

If they deny it at the hearing I can seek a private eval.

Trev92
12-20-14, 11:14 PM
Hmm. I'll be honest, this is a little outside the scope of my experience but I'll offer what I can. It sounds like DD had mixed results on her IQ testing because of the adhd/add. Frequently happens to me at my yearly IQ evaluation- if my Adderall is not in my system yet I start off strong and lose focus on the second half of the test. My actual IQ is usually between 114 and 120 with my lowest ever score being 110 and my highest being 126. My real struggle was with abstract thinking skills (the image flipping and predicting patterns section) which leads to me having a stronger score in verbal areas than abstract ones. Just requires too much focus for my unfocused brain. Sounds like your dd is having a similar effect- she scored well enough on the reading exam not to show dyslexia but scored lower on other sections. I have never had dyslexia so I can't begin to theorize why this went undetected. I DO however have ADD inattentive/impulsive type and I can say that the second half is always the hardest part of ANY exam I take, psychological or otherwise. I'd suggest getting statements from these concerned teachers and presenting them with your own at this hearing. It MAY be that your dd can function at an average or even above average level in public school with no special allotments if she is properly medicated- but that is for you and her evaluation team to decide. Also Oppositional Defiance Disorder is a fancy term for "voices disagreements with authority figures" and in my book is a crock of crap. Encourage your dd to advocate for herself- if she is present at the hearing, maybe SHE could speak about her difficulties in class- that would probably carry some weight. Good luck!

michaelaisabell
12-20-14, 11:57 PM
Those are exactly the areas she scored lowest in! The patterning and image flipping!
I think you have a great idea about letting her voice her opinions at tge hearing.
She is 7 but very smart.
She also scored highest in her verbal skills.

Thank you so much for your insight. I have never taken a formal iq test.

She was also seen by spoech therapy since she used to have a speech delay and she scored extremely high on the speech therapists tests for verbal skills.

They said that on the iq test she also struggled with sequential pictures. Where you look at pics and put them In order of which is first second... Last.
But the same type of test where the pictures had words ( they made a short story) she did fine on.

Trev92
12-21-14, 12:14 AM
yep sounds exactly like my results as a kid....and sadly to this day lol. It has to do with the extent of an individuals focus. My VERBAL IQ is well above average, bordering somewhere close to the gifted range however my abstract thinking skills are in the lower levels of average which brings my total score to somewhere between 114 and 120. It's definitely the curse of ADD unfortunately.....we are usually very intelligent people but alas, we are distracted by shiny objects before we can even begin to think about curing cancer lol. And yes I really feel that even at seven years old, the young lady is her own best advocate- empowerment isn't a bad thing to learn at that age either ;). Good luck to you- and pm me with the results!

michaelaisabell
12-21-14, 12:33 AM
yep sounds exactly like my results as a kid....and sadly to this day lol. It has to do with the extent of an individuals focus. My VERBAL IQ is well above average, bordering somewhere close to the gifted range however my abstract thinking skills are in the lower levels of average which brings my total score to somewhere between 114 and 120. It's definitely the curse of ADD unfortunately.....we are usually very intelligent people but alas, we are distracted by shiny objects before we can even begin to think about curing cancer lol. And yes I really feel that even at seven years old, the young lady is her own best advocate- empowerment isn't a bad thing to learn at that age either ;). Good luck to you- and pm me with the results!

I will Definitely let you know what the outcome is :)

To complicate everything. The testing and any services come from the public school. My daughter goes to a catholic school. So she will either need to leave school to get extra help or go in after school.

zette93
12-21-14, 10:32 AM
What state are you in? I would recommend contacting your state Decoding Dyslexia group (they will have a facebook page named Decoding Dyslexia - XX, where XX is the state abbreviation) and see if there are any other parents in your area you can connect with. They can also tell you if you're in one of the states that has recently passed legislation requiring the schools to recognize and properly treat dyslexia.

Next, read From Emotions to Advocacy by Peter Wright. Best book there is on the IEP process. He has a new book out called All About Tests and Assessments. I haven't read it yet, but it sounds like it would be very relevant for you right now.

The scatter in the IQ subtests is very interesting. I'm can't imagine that just dropping the highest score from the average would be proper procedure. What were the scores on her subtests? It's actually very common for kids with Aspergers (mild autism) to show this kind of scatter. Combined with scoring "at risk" for ASD on the questionnaire, a history of speech issues, and your comment that she has social/emotional issues, it wouldn't hurt for you to read up on Aspergers in girls. Sometimes they are social chameleons who are expending a huge amount of energy trying to copy other girls' behavior so as to fit in.

You say she's 7 and a year behind in reading. Would that be 1st or 2nd grade? What are the reading issues you're noticing? How is her spelling? If you google "Susan Barton signs and symptoms" she has some very good videos on the warning signs and classic reading mistakes that dyslexics make.

Some of the tests you want to have done are:
CTOPP -- comprehensive test of phonological processing
GORT -- gray oral reading test
TOWRE -- test of word reading efficiency

If your daughter scores poorly on these tests, you'll have a stronger argument for getting help from the public school. They can't just use the discrepancy between IQ and reading score anymore. A good educational advocate would know what the alternate criteria in your state are. But you have to be wary of spending most of your energy and money fighting for services from the school, but then getting a program that doesn't work for dyslexic kids.

If she is dyslexic, you probably can't count on the public schools to help her learn to read any better than the Catholic school has done. A dyslexic kid needs an Orton-Gillingham based program such as Wilson, Barton, Sonday, Slingerland, or Lindamood-Bell. I would recommend looking into hiring a Barton tutor, or tutoring her yourself using Barton. (It's designed for parents, and is used by a lot of homeschooling families. There's a DVD with each level that teaches you how to teach reading and spelling using their program.)

michaelaisabell
12-21-14, 11:35 AM
What state are you in? I would recommend contacting your state Decoding Dyslexia group (they will have a facebook page named Decoding Dyslexia - XX, where XX is the state abbreviation) and see if there are any other parents in your area you can connect with. They can also tell you if you're in one of the states that has recently passed legislation requiring the schools to recognize and properly treat dyslexia.

Next, read From Emotions to Advocacy by Peter Wright. Best book there is on the IEP process. He has a new book out called All About Tests and Assessments. I haven't read it yet, but it sounds like it would be very relevant for you right now.

The scatter in the IQ subtests is very interesting. I'm can't imagine that just dropping the highest score from the average would be proper procedure. What were the scores on her subtests? It's actually very common for kids with Aspergers (mild autism) to show this kind of scatter. Combined with scoring "at risk" for ASD on the questionnaire, a history of speech issues, and your comment that she has social/emotional issues, it wouldn't hurt for you to read up on Aspergers in girls. Sometimes they are social chameleons who are expending a huge amount of energy trying to copy other girls' behavior so as to fit in.

You say she's 7 and a year behind in reading. Would that be 1st or 2nd grade? What are the reading issues you're noticing? How is her spelling? If you google "Susan Barton signs and symptoms" she has some very good videos on the warning signs and classic reading mistakes that dyslexics make.

Some of the tests you want to have done are:
CTOPP -- comprehensive test of phonological processing
GORT -- gray oral reading test
TOWRE -- test of word reading efficiency

If your daughter scores poorly on these tests, you'll have a stronger argument for getting help from the public school. They can't just use the discrepancy between IQ and reading score anymore. A good educational advocate would know what the alternate criteria in your state are. But you have to be wary of spending most of your energy and money fighting for services from the school, but then getting a program that doesn't work for dyslexic kids.

If she is dyslexic, you probably can't count on the public schools to help her learn to read any better than the Catholic school has done. A dyslexic kid needs an Orton-Gillingham based program such as Wilson, Barton, Sonday, Slingerland, or Lindamood-Bell. I would recommend looking into hiring a Barton tutor, or tutoring her yourself using Barton. (It's designed for parents, and is used by a lot of homeschooling families. There's a DVD with each level that teaches you how to teach reading and spelling using their program.)

Thank you soo much got your advice.

I will look into aspergers more.
When I say she has social issues it is like going and playing with a kid who is mean to her over and over. Or not telling a teacher when someone calls her a name.
There are two kids in particular who have picked on her. One is no longer in the same class we will call her K. She try's to steal my daughters friends away from her. I mean she will psychically pull on a girl who us playing with my daughter to go play with her instead. K is not as much if an issue this year as last since they are in different classes now but she has called my daughter stupid this years twice. At sometime last year my DD finally started to stay away from K and she still does now.

Now we have kid We will call C. C is new to the school and is a big kid. She has kicked my daughter lunch box while they were standing in line, and she somehow stabbed my daughter in the hand with a pencil ( I never got the full story on this and the assistant principle is going to an tge nurse what exactly happened since my dd had to go to the nurse) , now my daughter says she doesn't like C but that C "makes" her play with her.

So it's just stuff like that. But other than those two girls my daughter makes and keeps friends really well. She is actually quite the social butterfly but it's just that when someone is mean to her she doesn't handle it properly.
She is scared that if she tells on C or K that they will just lie to get out of trouble and that the teachers won't Beleive her.

The assistant principle talked to her a few days ago to let her now how important it is to tell sn adult right away when someone picks in her.

I just tell you all this because I'm wondering if any if this sounds typical to you.

She is in second grade and at the beginning of the year they tested her reafing level and she was at a 1.2 so she is basically exactly 1 year behind.

sarahsweets
12-23-14, 05:35 AM
Also google wrights law. It goes over all your PRISE which stands for parental rights in special education.

michaelaisabell
12-27-14, 08:23 PM
Also google wrights law. It goes over all your PRISE which stands for parental rights in special education.

Thanks I was actually on that site before posting here.

To be honest all if this is very overwhelming for me.
The doctor I found that I wanted to take her to is not accepting any new patients.

This whole thing makes my brain spin. Idk where to start.

michaelaisabell
12-27-14, 08:26 PM
I gta push through all my adhd BS to get my dd the help she needs in school and medically.
Probably doesn't help that my meds are wearing off now. Lol I'm sure I'll feel less overwhelmed tomorrow.

Ok also since she is in a private school. If the school is willing to make acvomidations per my request should I even bother with the fight through the public school?
Is there something more the public school can do for her that the school she's at might not be able to?

zette93
12-28-14, 08:47 AM
You need to connect with other parents of dyslexic kids to find out what the public school is likely to offer. Staying at the private school and using Barton Reading (you can be the tutor or you can hire one) might be a very good option.

BrainFreeze
01-04-15, 01:15 AM
There needs to be a school for kids with ADHD and everything that goes with it.

Tinatheawesome
01-11-15, 03:20 PM
It would be called a special school

zette93
01-11-15, 08:07 PM
There actually a category called a "non-public" school. This term refers to schools that specialize in disabled kids (different ones have different specialties -- autism, learning disabilities and dyslexia, behavioral issues, intellectual disability, etc). School districts pay the tuition for a child to go there when the child can't learn or is extremely disruptive in general ed, and the school district doesn't have a special day class that is appropriate for the child. My son is in one for Aspergers. It's very hard to get these placements -- you usually need either severe disability or a very good advocate who can prove that the child isn't making progress in the current setting.

MrsMoMo
01-12-15, 11:50 AM
Have you met with the teacher and/or principal in person? If not, I would do so and explain how she is behind in certain areas and what can you do together to help her? I'm not sure how it works in the states (I'm in Canada) but DS had some minor accommodations in place even before we got the official diagnosis of ADHD. In your case, it could just be learning disability or it might be combination of that and ADHD. It's also not uncommon for ADHD to bring down IQ score -- and IQ score is not really the most important indicator in children, especially those having learning disabilities or ADHD, etc.

My son had certain areas of his IQ score lowered because of issues he has with word retrieval. He does not have a speech delay and has an advanced vocabulary but sometimes cannot "find" the words he wants to say (like mild aphasia). So those areas in testing were low. Most other areas were average to above-average and we discovered he is highly gifted in math, and off the charts in spatial quantities math.