View Full Version : advice needed


Jacob h
12-22-14, 03:23 PM
Hi everyone this is my first post :)

My name is Jacob and I'm 17 and a junior in highschool. I have not been diagnosed but I strongly suspect I have adhd inattentive. I have done lots of research online and taken several self tests that say I am moderately to severely likely to be adhd primarily inattentive. I have been homeschooling myself through highschool after I refused to go back to the public highschool after two days.

Symptoms I can think of off the top of my head.
In school
I have an extremely hard time concentrating on schoolwork and constantly procrastinate. I made it through middle school with the least amount of work possible and never studied for a single test. I used to get almost all A's with little effort but as I got into 7th and 8th grade my grades all slipped to B's as the work got harder and I continued to put no effort into school. By 8th grade I got all C's in math and in highschool I'm now struggling to keep my math grade above a D. All work that requires any effort gets put off as long as possible and I have become a disturbingly good liar to keep my parents from finding out how little work I get done.

In public
I am extremely quiet in public and don't really talk to people. I have a hard time making friends and get over losing them way to quickly. After 8th grade all my friends went to different high schools then me, these were pretty much my only friends and I've known them all since first grade. And yet I never even called one of them afterwards. I haven't talked to any of them in over 2 years. I have a new group of friends but I wouldn't consider myself to be very close with many of them. At parties or just hanging out with a group of friends I don't know how to act. I have trouble making eye contact with people when I'm talking and only do when I'm making a conscious effort to. I have no idea what to do with my hands when I'm sitting or standing and constantly change positions. I listen to others conversations but don't enter them unless expressly asked. Other people think I'm bored or hate being there but I really do like to just be there with people,
even if I don't say more than a few words in several hours. I have the exact opposite problem when there is only a few people and I just don't shut up, especially if it's something that I really care about.

At home
First off I'm part of a very large family I have 2 brothers and 4 sisters. I have been told by family members that I'm really annoying at times and that I don't know when to drop something, such as taking a joke to far or running a conversation into the ground. I am also told I am rude or being mean a lot, this one hurts a lot because I really don't know what I'm doing is bad. I frequently forget things soon after hearing them and people don't believe me because they all think I'm lazy or just trying to get out of doing something. I often zone out during conversations and miss what people say and then pretend I still know what is being talked about even though I no longer have any clue.

By myself
When I find something I like or find interesting I obsess over it for days or weeks to the exclusion of all else. If left alone I will read books or browse online all day everyday and I constantly have music on because it helps me tune out other people. When I'm alone I talk incessantly. I daydream all the time.

Sorry for such an extremely long post I hadn't planned on making it this long when I started but it all just sort of flowed out. :) As you can see I think I have inattentive adhd but I would like to know if others think it is likely before I bring it up with my parents. I have no idea how they will react and would like to be as sure as possible before I say a word.

dvdnvwls
12-22-14, 04:43 PM
Hello, and welcome to the forum.

It's not really possible to figure out if you have ADHD from a single forum post. However, look at it like this: from the way things have been going, you sure have something, and it looks enough like ADHD that it's reasonable to suspect it.

Can you reasonably expect that if it turns out you "have something", including maybe something that requires some type of medication, that your parents will be supportive? Or are they very likely to want to block off certain treatment options because they're against such things? If your parents are likely to be quite hostile, then maybe there are advantages to deciding to "hang tough" until you're 18 - but I don't know about that stuff. (I was not diagnosed until I was 40.)

sarahsweets
12-22-14, 10:47 PM
you should also read up on asbergers.

BellaVita
12-22-14, 10:51 PM
I also agree with Sarah, check out info about Asperger's.

Your symptoms sound a lot like mine.

rickymooston
03-22-15, 01:48 PM
you should also read up on asbergers.

Out of curiousity, which symptoms sounded like asbergers ...? I read over quickly and thought I wrote the post, lol. The only thing that sounds like
asbergers to me was something about being obsessed with something. Thing
is, I have that too?

I hope a competent doctor would (without prompting) consider asbergers
as well as any other alternatives like BP, OCD, food allergies, low
blood sugar, lack of sleep, ...? (I'm unsure what the possibilities are but
choose some that could fit.)

My advice is: get tested by a doctor familiar with ADHD (and hopefully asbergers and other related things).

mbrandon
05-27-15, 11:59 PM
Wow. You sound very similar to me, I have been diagnosed ADHD-PI.

In regards to what Sarah and Bella said, I did ask specifically about potential to Aspergers and was told I was not, but no doubt at all for ADD.

My diagnosis should not mean anything to you other than you should continue to pursue this. Also no guarantee I don't have overlap with Aspergers.

psychopathetic
05-28-15, 01:09 AM
Out of curiousity, which symptoms sounded like asbergers ...?

-The being awkward with his friends and in social situations
-His fidgeting with his hands possibly when he's nervous
-The hard time making eye contact with others
-The taking jokes/conversations too far and the being told he's rude/mean by others (meaning maybe he has a hard time with communication and with understanding things like body language)
-The obsessing on things (limited range of interests)

I may be missing some here.

psychopathetic
05-28-15, 01:12 AM
Here's a list of symptoms webmd.com lists for children with aspergers...and they say that a lot of these carry on into the teens:




Not pick up on social cues and may lack inborn social skills, such as being able to read others' body language, start or maintain a conversation, and take turns talking.



Dislike any changes in routines.



Appear to lack empathy.



Be unable to recognize subtle differences in speech tone, pitch, and accent that alter the meaning of others' speech. So your child may not understand a joke or may take a sarcastic comment literally. And his or her speech may be flat and hard to understand because it lacks tone, pitch, and accent.



Have a formal style of speaking that is advanced for his or her age. For example, the child may use the word "beckon" instead of "call" or the word "return" instead of "come back."



Talk a lot, usually about a favorite subject. One-sided conversations are common. Internal thoughts are often verbalized.



Avoid eye contact or stare at others.



Have unusual facial expressions or postures.



Be preoccupied with only one or few interests, which he or she may be very knowledgeable about. Many children with Asperger's syndrome are overly interested in parts of a whole or in unusual activities, such as designing houses, drawing highly detailed scenes, or studying astronomy. They may show an unusual interest in certain topics such as snakes, names of stars, or dinosaurs.



Have delayed motor development. Your child may be late in learning to use a fork or spoon, ride a bike, or catch a ball. He or she may have an awkward walk. Handwriting is often poor.



Have heightened sensitivity and become overstimulated by loud noises, lights, or strong tastes or textures. For more information about these symptoms, see sensory processing disorder (http://www.webmd.com/children/sensory-integration-dysfunction).