View Full Version : Superior colliculus and emotional self regulation?


mildadhd
01-02-15, 02:20 PM
The optic tectum is one of the fundamental components of the vertebrate brain, existing across the full range of species from hagfish to human.[21] (See the brain article for background.) Some aspects of the structure are very consistent, including a structure composed of a number of layers, with a dense input from the optic tracts to the superficial layers and another strong input conveying somatosensory input to deeper layers. Other aspects are highly variable, such as the total number of layers (from 3 in the African lungfish to 15 in the goldfish[22]), and the number of different types of cells (from 2 in the lungfish to 27 in the house sparrow[22]). In hagfish, lamprey, and shark it is a relatively small structure, but in teleost fish it is greatly expanded, in some cases becoming the largest structure in the brain. (See the adjoining drawing of a codfish brain.) In amphibians, reptiles, and especially birds it is also a very significant component, but in mammals it is dwarfed by the massive expansion of the cerebral cortex.[22]


In snakes that can detect infrared radiation, such as pythons and pit vipers, the initial neural input is through the trigeminal nerve instead of the optic tract. The rest of the processing is similar to that of the visual sense and, thus, involves the optic tectum.[23]

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superior_colliculus


Fascinating.

I wonder why the optic tectum is smaller in humans and why the neocortex is bigger in humans, and other factors involved?

Kunga Dorji introduced me the terms superior colliculus in the past.

But I wasn't ready to take on the depth of the information.

This year I would like to learn about the Superior colliculus and ADHD more in depth.

Insights appreciated.



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meadd823
01-03-15, 03:17 PM
to make room for the cereberal cortex, instead of simply reacting on stimuli in "social predators" a group human are a part of it doe snot pay evolutionary speaking for us to simply react to any and all stimuli without processing it first - There are of coarse exceptions to the rule and humans can and do react instinctively to some things but not every thing lest we end up eating or harming members of our our "pack" for which we depend upon for our own survival.

As lone hunters humans suck when compared to other animals. We are slow awkward but we do mange to have endurance like few other species on earth - What we do have going for us is use of weapons and communication without those things we are just another meal and not a very challenging one at that. The cerebral cortex is where things like communication processing ect ect occur

Cerebral Cortex Function (http://www.buzzle.com/articles/cerebral-cortex-function.html)

meadd823
01-03-15, 03:19 PM
When looking to the scientific reasoning behind why is this that and that this looking at in in the light of species survival minus any emotional attachment one may have often provides at the very least some possible explanations

mildadhd
01-04-15, 12:20 PM
Sorry I don't understand?

Emotional attachment is the corner stone of human psychology.

Tertiary Neocortical processing is very important but would be useless without primary processing and secondary processing.

Why not consider the whole brain working and developing together?




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mildadhd
01-04-15, 02:04 PM
to make room for the cereberal cortex, instead of simply reacting on stimuli in "social predators" a group human are a part of it doe snot pay evolutionary speaking for us to simply react to any and all stimuli without processing it first - There are of coarse exceptions to the rule and humans can and do react instinctively to some things but not every thing lest we end up eating or harming members of our our "pack" for which we depend upon for our own survival.

As lone hunters humans suck when compared to other animals. We are slow awkward but we do mange to have endurance like few other species on earth - What we do have going for us is use of weapons and communication without those things we are just another meal and not a very challenging one at that. The cerebral cortex is where things like communication processing ect ect occur

Cerebral Cortex Function (http://www.buzzle.com/articles/cerebral-cortex-function.html)

Change but not complete change in sensory input?

Separate brain systems involved may also have more than one job?

It seems to help to compare the brains and bodies similarities and differences, with the animals lives.




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