View Full Version : personality disorders in parents of add


daveddd
01-07-15, 09:17 AM
why are personality disorders so common in parents of add kids , , any ideas???

seems accurate from what i read here on the forum though

full study…… http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4261795/






ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:212614. doi: 10.1155/2014/212614. Epub 2014 Nov 26.
Personality profile of parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Dadashzadeh H1, Amiri S2, Atapour A3, Abdi S1, Asadian M4.
Author information
Abstract
Objectives. The present study was carried out aiming to identify the personality profile of parents of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Methods. This study is of a descriptive, analytic, cross-sectional type in which parents of 6-12-year-old children with ADHD who were referred to the Bozorgmehr Psychiatric Clinic, affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, were enrolled. ADHD was diagnosed according to the criteria of DSM-IV-TR and a quasi-structured diagnostic interview (K-SADS-PL). The personality profile of the parents was assessed with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Results. According to the findings of this study, the most common personality problems based on the assessment scales in the MCMI-III belonged to the clinical patterns of depressive personality in 43 persons (25.3%), histrionic personality in 34 persons (20%), and compulsive personality in 29 persons (17.1%). According to discriminant analysis, four scales of somatoform, sadistic, dependence, and though disorder were direct and antisocial scale was reverse significant predictors of membership in the women group. Conclusion. According to the findings of this pilot study, personality disorders are prevalent in parents of ADHD children and mothers suffer from personality disorders more than fathers.
PMID: 25525613 [PubMed - in process] PMCID: PMC4261795 Free PMC Article

Abi
01-07-15, 09:41 AM
My father is almost certainly borderline. He did mess me up emotionally a lot

BellaVita
01-07-15, 09:46 AM
Yep, and my mom is likely Narcissistic and dad true psychopath.

I don't know how I didn't come out crazy.

anonymouslyadd
01-07-15, 11:10 AM
I think my mom has many traits of a personality disorder.

daveddd
01-07-15, 11:11 AM
if i had to say, my mother would likely be closest to avoidant personality disorder

AshT
01-07-15, 12:35 PM
Dad was a horrific psychopath. Find the worst crimes one can commit, he did and got away with them.
Interesting. Also believe he had ADHD, BUT he also grew up with his sister who I also believe is a psychopath (she also purposely dropped me down the stairs at 4 months old).
Only way he could have beat her would be to become and even worse one I guess, and he was damn imaginative and clever, can't fault him there.

In my quick scanning through I coudn't see if it was specifying specific personality disorders? Or just in general?

daveddd
01-07-15, 12:41 PM
Dad was a horrific psychopath. Find the worst crimes one can commit, he did and got away with them.
Interesting. Also believe he had ADHD, BUT he also grew up with his sister who I also believe is a psychopath (she also purposely dropped me down the stairs at 4 months old).
Only way he could have beat her would be to become and even worse one I guess, and he was damn imaginative and clever, can't fault him there.

In my quick scanning through I coudn't see if it was specifying specific personality disorders? Or just in general?


yea, it specifies a few

for men, antisocial (current definition of psychopath, but only with certain types, you can be anti social but not a psychopath) was most prevalent

Lunacie
01-07-15, 01:11 PM
Well, first you have to look at the genetics angle,
that the children inherited ADHD from parents who may never have been
diagnosed with a mental disorder themselves,
and therefore never have gotten any treatment help.


Then you have to look at the stress involved in raising a child with a physical
or mental disorder and how that can affect the parent.


And third, you have to look at the feelings that parent may have:
guilt over having a child who isn't normal or typical:
feeling like the child isn't living up to expectations which is denial:
depression because they can't make their child "normal."


So first the personality disorder may actually be an undiagnosed mental disorder.
Then you have the effects of living with a child who is very difficult to parent
which can cause feelings that are expressed as personality disorders.

daveddd
01-07-15, 01:20 PM
Well, first you have to look at the genetics angle,
that the children inherited ADHD from parents who may never have been
diagnosed with a mental disorder themselves,
and therefore never have gotten any treatment help.


Then you have to look at the stress involved in raising a child with a physical
or mental disorder and how that can affect the parent.


And third, you have to look at the feelings that parent may have:
guilt over having a child who isn't normal or typical:
feeling like the child isn't living up to expectations which is denial:
depression because they can't make their child "normal."


So first the personality disorder may actually be an undiagnosed mental disorder.
Then you have the effects of living with a child who is very difficult to parent
which can cause feelings that are expressed as personality disorders.

maybe, but the correlation of add and personality disorders is well known

so i don't know about the personality disorder being mistaken for something

because mainly i don't feel a personality disorder is really "something" , just a group of symptoms you have or you don't

which makes me think of marsha linehan, a world wide known expert in PDs, she never said someone "had" a PD , she always said the person who "meets the criteria" for a PD, and its well established that PDs have a genetic link

so, there is a relation here, I'm curios as to why

the study uses the millon multi axis inventory , which is the gold standard in dxing PDs, the relation is there

willow129
01-07-15, 01:25 PM
Huh...

one thing is Lunacie, it seems that you are saying that some of the disorder with the parent could start presenting after the difficult child came along.

But I know things were messed with my mom before the kids came along, and the things that made it worse were not really because of the kids, it was more like..bad marriages and stuff.

daveddd
01-07-15, 01:29 PM
Huh...

one thing is Lunacie, it seems that you are saying that some of the disorder with the parent could start presenting after the difficult child came along.

But I know things were messed with my mom before the kids came along, and the things that made it worse were not really because of the kids, it was more like..bad marriages and stuff.

these things are usually transactional

disorder leads to=bad marriages leads to=worsening of or expanding disorders

Lunacie
01-07-15, 01:36 PM
Huh...

one thing is Lunacie, it seems that you are saying that some of the disorder with the parent could start presenting after the difficult child came along.

But I know things were messed with my mom before the kids came along, and the things that made it worse were not really because of the kids, it was more like..bad marriages and stuff.

Yes, a parent with no mental or personality disorders is going to have a harder
time parenting a child with a physical or mental problem.

A parent who does have a mental or personality disorder is going to have
an even harder time as the parent of a child with a disorder
than they would with a child who doesn't have such problems.

And as daveddd correctly points out, raising a difficult child is hard on a marriage,
which is stressful whether the parent has a disorder him/herself or not.

Unmanagable
01-07-15, 01:38 PM
My dad had issues 'out of the ordinary' (according to mom's wording) show up around age 55 and was diagnosed as manic depressant (bipolar) and was given prozac and sent home. My mom told them it was something much deeper than that and she demanded physical testing. He had a brain tumor the size of a softball and passed away 4 months later.

daveddd
01-07-15, 01:41 PM
Yes, a parent with no mental or personality disorders is going to have a harder
time parenting a child with a physical or mental problem.

A parent who does have a mental or personality disorder is going to have
an even harder time as the parent of a child with a disorder
than they would with a child who doesn't have such problems.

And as daveddd correctly points out, raising a difficult child is hard on a marriage,
which is stressful whether the parent has a disorder him/herself or not.

i have to wonder if personality disorders are truly a "faulty" personality

actually i don't think most believe that


ADHD, bipolar, autism, whatnot have a very low stress tolerance

very low stress tolerance plus- high amounts of stress (marriage or child bearing, or trauma) lead to coping mechanisms, that in the right groupings lead to a dx of a PD

specifically , its well established now that PDs all have a basis in poor emotional regulation

daveddd
01-07-15, 01:42 PM
My dad had issues 'out of the ordinary' (according to mom's wording) show up around age 55 and was diagnosed as manic depressant (bipolar) and was given prozac and sent home. My mom told them it was something much deeper than that and she demanded physical testing. He had a brain tumor the size of a softball and passed away 4 months later.

thats terrible

sorry:grouphug::grouphug:

daveddd
01-07-15, 04:39 PM
Yep, and my mom is likely Narcissistic and dad true psychopath.

I don't know how I didn't come out crazy.

yea, luckily i didn't come out crazy either:eyebrow::rolleyes:

Abi
01-07-15, 06:29 PM
Me neither :lol:

mildadhd
01-07-15, 11:59 PM
To me the differences between personality disorders, including ADHD, is the severity of lack of emotional regulation.


Lack of primary emotional regulation, secondary emotional regulation and tertiary emotional regulation.

Lack of secondary emotional regulation and tertiary emotional regulation.

Lack of tertiary emotional regulation.





P

mildadhd
01-08-15, 11:16 PM
Personality Disorders

Other Languages | More Info Sheets

Each of us has a unique personality that that is reflective of both our genetic make-up and our life experiences.

Our personality develops over the years, and is a vital part of what makes us who we are and how we interact with others....




....Causes

The symptoms of personality disorders are usually caused by a variety of factors, including early life experience and learned behaviours, social environment, biological make up and genetics.

Individuals with personality disorders may have impaired regulation of the brain circuits that control emotion.

This biological finding, when combined with psychological and social factors such as abuse, neglect or separation, may put a person at a higher risk of developing a personality disorder.



http://www.cmha.bc.ca/get-informed/mental-health-information/personality-disorders



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Pilgrim
01-09-15, 03:49 AM
All I know is that I made it through school and had various coping mechanisms.

After I left I started to cope really badly. That's why I have no problem with medication.

My mother found it hard to cope and we suffered for it. I guess I have some bad memories from this, I've tried to leave it behind.

I think my mother has something like ADD from some of the stuff she says.
All her family are quite negative. They do try.
I have asked myself these questions many times.
It would be great to turn on the ability to cope. Pls

Fortune
01-09-15, 03:52 AM
yea, it specifies a few

for men, antisocial (current definition of psychopath, but only with certain types, you can be anti social but not a psychopath) was most prevalent

I think that Robert Hare takes a lot of issue with ASPD being used to mean psychopath. It really doesn't succeed at capturing "psychopath" as a diagnostic entity and because of its focus on criminal activity people who really shouldn't be diagnosed with it can be diagnosed with it.

Like, ASPD is hardly without controversy as a diagnostic category.

daveddd
01-10-15, 09:17 AM
I think that Robert Hare takes a lot of issue with ASPD being used to mean psychopath. It really doesn't succeed at capturing "psychopath" as a diagnostic entity and because of its focus on criminal activity people who really shouldn't be diagnosed with it can be diagnosed with it.

Like, ASPD is hardly without controversy as a diagnostic category.

i hate it

even what hare termed the "secondary psychopath " is more appropriate

aspd defines actions, actions aren't equal to PDs

someone i also doubt the specifier "during the course of an axis 1 disorder" is thoroughly evaluated when diagnosing ASPD

Fortune
01-10-15, 09:46 AM
Yes, that's it. ASPD defines actions in a way that I think other PDs do not.