View Full Version : Is it safe for me to consume alcohol?


PaulJunior92
01-31-15, 01:08 PM
Hey there,

I was wondering if its ok for me to consume alcohol tonight considering the fact I haven't taken my Vyvanse and Wellbutrin today? Also, if so, should I also skip taking my meds tomorrow morning? Let me add, my last experience drinking on the day I took my pills wasn't too great as it left me with heart palpitations.


Many thanks!!
Paul

tinybike
01-31-15, 01:57 PM
Do you have a nurses' hotline where you live? You might get a better answer if you call that. I don't think anyone here could responsibly say whether or not it's safe, we can just parrot the warnings.

Wellbutrin can reduce the threshold for seizures, and in some people that is quite significant. Conversely, coming off it when you've been on it a long time (esp at a high dose) without titrating can also cause seizures. When you combine these factors with alcohol, there can be a considerable (but unpredictable) risk. For most people, it would take more than a couple of drinks, but that's a function of your baseline tolerance, liver health, body weight, dose of WB, predisposition to seizures etc etc etc.

I don't know what happens when you drink on Vyvanse or what happens when you skip a dose (I only skipped a dose once and I just slept all day lol).

Flory
01-31-15, 02:46 PM
I wouldn't advise it at all, it also depends what kind of drinking you are doing, hammered drunk obviously being the worst idea

PaulJunior92
01-31-15, 05:21 PM
I wouldn't advise it at all, it also depends what kind of drinking you are doing, hammered drunk obviously being the worst idea

I'll limit myself to 6 shots of vodka. How's that? :D Also I normally take 70mg of Vyvanse and 150mg of Wellbutrin so I guess those aren't really high doses

Flory
01-31-15, 05:31 PM
I'd be worried about the palpitations, I totally missed that bud.

The combination of amphetamines and alcohol can cause micro tears on the heart due to the strain which if excessive enough can cause big problems. I think the palpitations are your bodies way of saying it's not a good mix for you, I'd also worr about the lowered seizure threshold, if you are inebriated and seized you could really hurt yourself

Flory
01-31-15, 05:33 PM
A glass of wine with a meal is one thing but i think that much alcohol would be advisable to skip meds, I don't know if you can skip Wellbutrin so would have to confirm with you doc, but skipping vyvanse for the day wouldn't hurt you

sarahsweets
02-03-15, 05:42 AM
I'm a believer that if you have to plan alcohol around your meds then thats entirely too much thought.

Jenn1202
02-04-15, 12:33 AM
...Let me add, my last experience drinking on the day I took my pills wasn't too great as it left me with heart palpitations.


Given your past experience it probably wouldn't be such a good idea. Do you really want to risk getting these symptoms again?

FocusPocus10
03-30-15, 02:59 PM
You're fine I've drank on those meds. Not a big deal just don't get "drunk" on wellbutrin or youll foam and seizure. Enjoy

GeordieDave
03-30-15, 03:46 PM
I'm on 150mg Wellbutrin. I'm not advising anything here but I have not had an issue whilst drinking.

My Pdoc advised me to not take my meds on the day and the next day and to take it easy.

I normally drink Coors light and Jager bombs. Tend to stay off the Vodka and the heavy spirits.

ADXP
07-26-15, 02:43 PM
This would answer your question for good.

Evidence suggests that alcohol affects brain function by interacting with multiple
neurotransmitter systems, thereby disrupting the delicate balance between inhibitory
and excitatory neurotransmitters. Short-term alcohol exposure tilts this balance in favor
of inhibitory influences. After long-term alcohol exposure, however, the brain attempts
to compensate by tilting the balance back toward equilibrium. These neurological
changes occur as the development of tolerance to alcohol’s effects. When alcohol
consumption is abruptly discontinued or reduced, these compensatory changes are no
longer opposed by the presence of alcohol, thereby leading to the excitation of
neurotransmitter systems and the development of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Longterm
alcohol intake also induces changes in many neurotransmitter systems that
ultimately lead to the development of craving and alcohol-seeking behavior. KEY WORDS:
neurotransmitter receptors; neurotransmission; AODE (alcohol and other drug effects); AOD
use behavior; AOD tolerance; AOD withdrawal syndrome; AOD craving; biological inhibition;
memory; reinforcement; biochemical mechanism; literature review

Alcohol and
Neurotransmitter
Interactions

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh21-2/144.pdf