View Full Version : Shorter Life Span with ADD


sarahsweets
03-01-15, 06:49 PM
Reposting
Adhd may lead to a shorter life span
Interesting article http://www.nbcnews.com/health/mental-health/got-adhd-you-may-live-shorter-life-study-shows-n313011

meadd823
03-02-15, 02:10 PM
It did work . . . . I will move your post to general when possible.

mildadhd
03-03-15, 12:19 AM
Living with AD(H)D can be overally distressful.





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sarek
03-03-15, 03:28 AM
I have had plenty of road accidents in my day. Considering that for quite a bit of that time I was driving mini's I can consider myself lucky to be still walking about.

Also, not in the article but very obvious, ADHD generally correlates with a weaker socio-economic positions which takes years off your life span. There is much more stress, you will have to make do with lower quality food, you won't be able to pay for medical treatments as well.

SB_UK
03-03-15, 08:47 AM
Very (di)stressful - ADHD

Just want to daydream in sun - anything else's 'too' much.

Lunacie
03-03-15, 01:05 PM
Very (di)stressful - ADHD

Just want to daydream in sun - anything else's 'too' much.

Too much sun can also shorten your life.
I stay in the shade because I can get a severe sun burn in a couple of hours.

mildadhd
03-03-15, 10:00 PM
Living with AD(H)D can often be overally emotionally distressful.




...so we are now realizing and many papers have been written, are making this case that ADHD is just as much a problem of impulsive emotions as it is with impulsive behavior, impulsive cognition and impulsive speech.

And it explains a lot about these individuals, not the least of which is of course, their social difficulties.

But it is also one of the best predictors, of their driving problems, their finacial problems, their marital problems, their child rearing problems, and it is one of the main reasons, why they will be fired from a job, four times more often, than other people are likely to do.

You don't get fired because your distractable, but you will get fired, if you are angry with a customer,,and if you blow up and are impatient, and easily frustrated, so this is a domain of ADHD that is often under appreciated, but is now being put back into our models, and theories and explanations of the disorder.( approx. 15:50)

-Dr.Russell Barkley

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUQu-OPrzUc



:) :) :)

mildadhd
03-03-15, 10:29 PM
Very (di)stressful - ADHD

Just want to daydream in sun - anything else's 'too' much.


"Plant blood". (Chlorophyll)




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meadd823
03-04-15, 02:41 AM
Too many people blame all the bad stuff on ADD - blah another thing for Barkley fans to bleat on about as if it really matters.

I spend a lot of my free time in nature I have learned situational luck determines weather one lives or dies at any give time. . . . I have seen smart well adapted animals die while ones as dumb as a box or rocks live Seems to me being in the right place at the right time or more accurately avoiding being in the wrong place at the wrong time best determine length of life

In illness heredity may play a part and in some cases the person has some hand in tipping the laws of probability in or out of their favor


Unless there is an element of practical application to all of this my plan is simply to keep on living life until I die. . . . . Death is a future we all share. - I do my best not to waste the time I have worrying about that which I do not have. I am ADHD not much I can do about that either Blaming all the bad crap in my life on it really does not matter to any one and frankly it seems like a waste of my time.

Blaming death on my ADD well that is silly - every thing dies one way or another. . .

sarahsweets
03-04-15, 06:16 AM
I think the fact that the article highlights the risks associatd with adhd is important.

acdc01
03-04-15, 07:32 AM
Unless there is an element of practical application to all of this my plan is simply to keep on living life until I die.

There is a practical application. Knowing you're more prone to accidents can help open your eyes to this weakness in yourself and encourage you to do more to protect yourself.

I didn't really accept how hazardous of a driver I was until after diagnosis and after I came to this board and everyone told me I basically shouldn't drive I was so bad.

Now, I can't quit driving, but I've taken way more safety precautions. I make sure I have a greater cushion between me and the car in front of me, I've got an app that will ring when I speed, I bought a car with tons of smart safety features. I drive less though still enough to keep my driving skills up since I can't quit. I also live within walking distance to work, grocery, etc - well I did this before I was diagnosed so maybe this doesn't count but you get the picture.

I still suck at driving and probably am still more likely to die but odds of dying have been reduced.

Knowledge is power. I consider this piece of knowledge extremely important as it's a matter of life and death. Thanks op by the way for linking this article.

Little Missy
03-04-15, 08:18 AM
Life insurance, baby, life insurance.

mildadhd
03-04-15, 09:46 AM
Doing the right thing at the right time, also strongly involves the RAGE (fight) or/and FEAR (flight) and other emotional response systems, in promoting survival.






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Lunacie
03-04-15, 03:42 PM
Too many people blame all the bad stuff on ADD - blah another thing for Barkley fans to bleat on about as if it really matters.

I spend a lot of my free time in nature I have learned situational luck determines weather one lives or dies at any give time. . . . I have seen smart well adapted animals die while ones as dumb as a box or rocks live Seems to me being in the right place at the right time or more accurately avoiding being in the wrong place at the wrong time best determine length of life

In illness heredity may play a part and in some cases the person has some hand in tipping the laws of probability in or out of their favor


Unless there is an element of practical application to all of this my plan is simply to keep on living life until I die. . . . . Death is a future we all share. - I do my best not to waste the time I have worrying about that which I do not have. I am ADHD not much I can do about that either Blaming all the bad crap in my life on it really does not matter to any one and frankly it seems like a waste of my time.

Blaming death on my ADD well that is silly - every thing dies one way or another. . .


I see a difference between blaming problems on a medical disorder
and understanding how that disorder can affect us negatively.

If we just blame the problem, we aren't doing anything about it.
When we understand the problem, we can treat the problem.

I'm a Barkley fan because he is spreading awareness and understanding
of ADHD and the problems it causes.



Everyone forgets or is impulsive ... when that disrupts our lives negatively
it is caused by the disorder.

Research shows that we are twice as likely to die from unnatural causes ...
that's also caused by the disorder.

There is nothing silly about being aware of this problem and doing anything
we can to minimize those odds.

Tara
03-04-15, 03:52 PM
I keep seeing this posted all over the place. I'm trying to see how exactly this article is helpful to Adults with ADD / ADHD. My take from reading it is that the damage has already been done to those of us who weren't diagnosed until adults.

I see nothing in the article about how to lead a better life with ADD / ADHD.

Stevuke79
03-04-15, 03:56 PM
Life insurance, baby, life insurance.

It's funny, when I saw this thread it reminded me that ADHD actually is something that life insurance companies consider when you apply.

It's strange,.. obviously they consider things like cholesterol or family histories.. but ADHD?! :giggle: To me that was a surprise. I guess it makes sense,.. whatever shows up on an actuary's table..

Lunacie
03-04-15, 04:31 PM
I keep seeing this posted all over the place. I'm trying to see how exactly this article is helpful to Adults with ADD / ADHD. My take from reading it is that the damage has already been done to those of us who weren't diagnosed until adults.

I see nothing in the article about how to lead a better life with ADD / ADHD.

If you aren't already dead, you've beaten the odds so far. :yes:

It wasn't clear they were talking about the risks of untreated ADHD
until the last two paragraphs. This is about treatment to reduce risk.

Dr. Lenard Adler, professor of adolescent and child psychiatry and director of the Adult ADHD Program at NYU Langone School of Medicine, said leaving the disorder untreated, "carries a high burden."

"Untreated symptoms get greater over time," Adler said. "We want the right diagnosis made for the right people."

Fuzzy12
03-04-15, 05:46 PM
Like lunacir and acdc said, knowledge or maybe rather awareness is power. Maybe sometimes we just need a reminder to be more careful, that we really need to be more careful.

I can imagine that ADHD reduces your life expectancy in many weird and wonderful ways, not just because of our increased accident risk. I guess people with ADHD might also struggle to make healthier life choices or e.g. to stick to a fitness routine or a healthy diet. Besides doesn't prolonged stress reduce your life expectancy and cause or increase your likelihood of getting all kinds of illnesses as well?

I remember reading an article once where the BBC interviewed some people above 100 and many of them attributed their longevity to some seriously crazy stuff like eating mince pies everyday. The only thing they seemed to have in common is that they lived relatively stress free lives. Not necessarily easy lives but they just didn't get very stressed or were rather good at dealing with difficult situations without getting stressed.

I guess, a lot of adher s also self medicate with unhealthy stuff like smoking, alcohol, food or other drugs.

I remember reading a study once about people with depression having a reduced life expectancy as well. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

mildadhd
03-04-15, 11:03 PM
If a person with AD(H)D is prescribed AD(H)D medication for focus, and the person does not take the medication, and gets in a driving accident, the person may be held accountable for the accident because the person did not take the medication prescribed.





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acdc01
03-04-15, 11:09 PM
If a person with AD(H)D is prescribed AD(H)D medication for focus, and the person does not take the medication, and gets in a driving accident, the person may be held accountable for the accident because the person did not take the medication prescribed.P

Are you sure about that and which countries are you talking about?

mildadhd
03-04-15, 11:34 PM
Are you sure about that and which countries are you talking about?


See video discussion timeline at (33:27) thru (35:27)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYO6k6ykZsg

acdc01
03-05-15, 01:41 PM
See video discussion timeline at (33:27) thru (35:27)

Thanks. I'm thinking the laws vary significantly depending on which country you're living in and even in which state within the US. I'm not even sure that television guy was definitely correct as he wasn't an expert or anything right?

Below's a link for driving while impaired (DWI) and driving while under the influence (DUI) laws for different US states. The laws for most states seem pretty ambiguous to me. What's clear though is that every state seems to be different.

Feels like it could go either way in some places. Like we could be considered as DWI because of ADHD if we don't take stimulates. OR we could be considered as DUI if we do take stimulants. It is way too confusing. And so important to clarify too since we could face heavy fines, be sued, or even be convicted of a crime.

Any other thoughts on this cause I'd really like to know the answer if there is a solid one?

http://www.dmv.org/automotive-law/dui.php

Lunacie
03-05-15, 02:01 PM
If you are taking prescribed medications at the proper dosage
that do not include the warning "do not drive after taking"
or combine several meds that can cause drowsiness,
I think it would be difficult to charge you with DUI.

mildadhd
03-05-15, 10:03 PM
Thanks. I'm thinking the laws vary significantly depending on which country you're living in and even in which state within the US. I'm not even sure that television guy was definitely correct as he wasn't an expert or anything right?

Below's a link for driving while impaired (DWI) and driving while under the influence (DUI) laws for different US states. The laws for most states seem pretty ambiguous to me. What's clear though is that every state seems to be different.

Feels like it could go either way in some places. Like we could be considered as DWI because of ADHD if we don't take stimulates. OR we could be considered as DUI if we do take stimulants. It is way too confusing. And so important to clarify too since we could face heavy fines, be sued, or even be convicted of a crime.

Any other thoughts on this cause I'd really like to know the answer if there is a solid one?

http://www.dmv.org/automotive-law/dui.php


Thanks

He is a retired Ontario Provincial Police Officer.

My layman understanding is that it is up to the Police Officer?

I am guessing charges would depend on past driving record?

I interested in learning more as well.

I have not driven in at least 15 years, but I am lucky to have public transit.

I like the bus better, occasionallly when the circumstances are right, the conditions help me concentrate while reading.

I think I am a safe driver, but the distress of driving sucks the life out of me.

When I drive with other people, I become more aware of my impairment, in the FEAR/anxiety of my passengers.








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acdc01
03-05-15, 10:22 PM
When I drive with other people, I become more aware of my impairment, in the FEAR/anxiety of my passenger

Yeah other people get fear/anxiety when I drive them. That's why we're all in agreement these days that they drive me.

Most US states do seem to leave it up to the officer. Like I found the below about Oregon laws.

Officially in Oregon, you can be charged with DUI if you have any amount of a controlled substance in your blood stream if an officer thinks you are driving under the influence - this means any amphetamine at all even for our ADHD. Would the charge stick? I'm guessing no but I did read some horror stories online from people in California (which may be old or not even true, not a confirmed source).

I found some forum posts about some country forcing you to get your dr. to sign off on you before you can drive if you have ADHD (dr. might make it a provision that you have to be taking your meds when driving in order to keep your license). So yeah, I think it varies. I would think there would have to be some paperwork saying you have to take meds in order for them to consider you DWI - but who knows.

http://dui.drivinglaws.org/resources/oregons-drugged-driving-law.htm

Kunga Dorji
03-06-15, 09:14 AM
Reposting
Adhd may lead to a shorter life span
Interesting article http://www.nbcnews.com/health/mental-health/got-adhd-you-may-live-shorter-life-study-shows-n313011

That is exactly why it is worth taking the problem seriously.
I mean it is a "disorder" after all- that is, I think, why we try to get a handle on it.

Kunga Dorji
03-06-15, 09:23 AM
If a person with AD(H)D is prescribed AD(H)D medication for focus, and the person does not take the medication, and gets in a driving accident, the person may be held accountable for the accident because the person did not take the medication prescribed.





P

I would argue that there is clear cut evidence that ADHD people are safer drivers when on medication _WHEN WE ARE TALKING ABOUT POPULATION AVERAGES.

However- that does not apply on a case by case basis.

Theoretically it is arguable that anyone with ADHD probably should take medication before driving-- but the flip side is this:

In the case of a car accident will the investigating police officer actually enquire of each driver as to whether they had ADHD and were they taking their medication?

I think not.
Also the police officer could not insist on each driver in every car accident revealing their medical history anyway-- so the ADHD driver who had been driving unmedicated could easily deny having ADHD- and nobody would ever know.

That is all entirely hypothetical of course , and it rests on the assumption that our police forces would ever be operating from a legislative model that recognised just how dangerous unmedicated ADHD drivers can be.

It will be a cold day in hell before that happens- politicians and law enforcement officers just aren't that good at keeping up with published science.

Kunga Dorji
03-06-15, 09:26 AM
It's funny, when I saw this thread it reminded me that ADHD actually is something that life insurance companies consider when you apply.

It's strange,.. obviously they consider things like cholesterol or family histories.. but ADHD?! :giggle: To me that was a surprise. I guess it makes sense,.. whatever shows up on an actuary's table..



It shows up on the actuary's table!

There we have it.

Objective proof that ADHD exists.

Finally :)

Can you reference this??/

SB_UK
03-06-15, 10:42 AM
"Plant blood". (Chlorophyll)




P

Thinking about chlorophyll currently; there's something intuitively appealing about it - consuming 00s of grams of raw parsley, basel.

KarmanMonkey
03-06-15, 02:37 PM
Again, stats describe trends, not individuals. I'd be interested to see what variables they incorporated. For example, is it ADD, or is it the fact that people with ADD tend to find formal education challenging?

It's very hard to prove that X causes Y. This is a big issue in the mental health world; we know that people with a mental health diagnosis live on average 10yrs less than the next person, but is this due to the mentall illness, or is this due to the stigma, marginalization, poverty and isolation that often comes alongside it? Is it the fact that people hit their first crisis usually between ages 17-24, when most people are trying to finish their education?

I take all studies like this with a grain of salt, at least until I know the guts of it. Then I usually throw it in the shredder and use it as bunny litter ;-)

mildadhd
03-07-15, 01:54 PM
What first surprised me, in the discussion on Canada's Worst Driver, was that they recognized an ADHD impairment, and that some people benefit from taking the medication prescribed.

I have been watching the show with my son, since the show began 10 years ago, and it has been so obvious that some of the people where suffering from some types of impairments, that where never recognized on the show, that I can remember?

The host of the show really cares and tries extremely hard to understand, but understandably reacts like a concerned overally frustrated parent who really does not always know how to deal with the situation



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mildadhd
03-11-15, 10:45 AM
Some human beings are hyperreactive.

A relatively negligible stimulus, or what to other people would seem negligible, sets off in them an intense reaction.

When this happens in response to physical stimuli, we say the person is allergic.

Someone allergic to, say, bee venom may choke, wheeze and gasp for air when stung.

The small airways in the lungs may go into spasm, tissues in the throat may swell, the heartbeat may become irregular.

His life may be in peril.

The nonallergic person, had she been stung by the same bee, would experience no more than a momentary pain, a welt, an irritating itch.

Was it the bee sting that sent the first victim into physiological crisis?

Not directly.

It was his own physiological responses that brought him close to death.

More accurately, it was the combination of stimulus and reaction.

The precise medical term for an allergy, for this hyperreactivity, is hypersensitivity.



Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", (Chapter: Emotional Allergies), P 57.




We seem like "someone allergic to, say," emotional distress.


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mildadhd
03-11-15, 11:04 AM
..Sensitivity is the reason why allergies are more common among ADD children than in the rest of the population.

It is well known, and borne out again and again in clinical practice, that children with ADD are more likely than their non-ADD-counterparts to have a history of frequent colds, upper respiratory infections, ear infections, asthma, eczema and allergies, a fact interpreted by some as evidence that ADD is due to allergies.

Although the flare-up of allergies can certainly aggravate ADD symptoms, the one does not cause the other.

They both are expressions of the same underlying inborn trait: sensitivity.

Since emotionally hypersensitive reactions are no less physiological than the body's allergic responses to physical substances, we may say truthfully that people with ADD have emotional allergies.


Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", (Chapter: Emotional Allergies), P 58.






We are "hyperreactive" to emotional, homeostatic and sensory distress.



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acdc01
03-11-15, 10:10 PM
We seem like "someone allergic to, say," emotional distress.
P

Are we really?

I feel like I'm actually less sensitive to all stimulus including emotional distress. That's why I need more stimulus in general.

The reason why it appears like I'm hyperreactive to distress is that I can't control my responses to any distress well cause of impulsivity (though my natural impulse is to recoil, not attack). So I'm not hypersensitive, I just appear that way. I'm actually less sensitive than NTs but I can't keep a poker face as well as they can and they hide their sensitivities better.

Also, chronic abuse from our environment can make us more sensitive (nurture not nature).

I fully admit this is just my guess and I can be completely wrong on the subject.

spunkysmum
03-11-15, 11:54 PM
Life insurance, baby, life insurance.

That brings up another interesting question - will insurance companies begin to categorize ADHD as a risk factor increasing the cost of insurance?

mildadhd
03-12-15, 12:20 AM
Are we really?

I feel like I'm actually less sensitive to all stimulus including emotional distress. That's why I need more stimulus in general.

The reason why it appears like I'm hyperreactive to distress is that I can't control my responses to any distress well cause of impulsivity (though my natural impulse is to recoil, not attack). So I'm not hypersensitive, I just appear that way. I'm actually less sensitive than NTs but I can't keep a poker face as well as they can and they hide their sensitivities better.

Also, chronic abuse from our environment can make us more sensitive (nurture not nature).

I fully admit this is just my guess and I can be completely wrong on the subject.

A person with asthma would be more sensitive to air pollution.


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Stevuke79
03-12-15, 09:45 AM
It shows up on the actuary's table!

There we have it.

Objective proof that ADHD exists.

Finally :)

Can you reference this??/

hi kunga, sorry for not replying sooner. i missed this post. just to clarify, what should i reference? i apologize if it's obvious what you mean.

do you mean the fact that adhd isa factor for underwriting life insurance?
if so, i think i could find that.

if you mean the actual actuarial table, those are closely guarded proprietary intellectual property..ive never been able to get my hands on that (ive tried, lol!!).. maybe i could google and find a stat though.

any way, my point was that i know from experience they consider adhd. i think i could reference that. is that what you are asking?