View Full Version : Control < Executive Function - Facilitating Action


someothertime
03-19-15, 09:37 AM
I came across this article... and for me to read most of a scientific paper... ( discovered two new words! ) it must be noteworthy.

LIFE-SPAN THEORY OF CONTROL (http://jpkc.ecnu.edu.cn/fzxlx/pdf/a life span theory of control.pdf)
JUTTA HECKHAUSEN AND RICHARD SCHULZ


Excerpt;

Aspects of action addressed by secondary control. Three aspects
of action regulation are the major targets of secondary
control strategies: (a) expectancy of goal attainment, (b) value
of goal attainment, and (c) causal attribution of action outcome.
These three aspects correspond to the following three types of
secondary control strategies: (a) expectation biases such as optimism,
defensive pessimism, adjustment of aspiration level,
and strategic selection of social reference group; (b) shifts in
goal values such as the "sour grapes" effect, disengagement, and
changes in goal hierarchy; and (c) biased attributions of outcomes
such as egotistic attributions of success and failure


It's NOT ADHD specifically... though for a long time i've wrestled with "environmental factors"... "facilitation"..... "maladaptive coping"...

This article on "Theory of control" goes along way to tying in mindfullness, nurture, and many of the other tangential behavioral contributors.

Any ties/research between the physiological aspect of control and behavioral development ( ADHD ) or if you happen to conjure the energy to read it your observations between this other theories / research would be most appreciated.



In a nutshell ( my words );

"Secondary, ( non-action ) coping mechanisms manifest due to physiological constraints in exercising primary control strategies. These in turn foster internal, often "failsafe/tangential" thinking, often compounding or morphing into other maladaptions".

It seems that individuals who are "guided" in a practical or strategic level behaviorally to continually realign with outcome / self benefit stand better odds more self facilitation throughout life.

Essentially, they get remediation / intervention before major coping control strategies develop. In the above quote it seems likely that many ADHD individuals have an abundance of (b) and the flipside of (c)... there is more interesting stuff within relating to this and behavioral adaption.

KarmanMonkey
03-20-15, 04:16 PM
I just read your post, and I like the idea of breaking down what I'd call the motivating factors of pursuing goals (if I'm interpreting correctly)

One thing I'd add as an important aspect of (b) is that the value we place on a goal can be greatly influenced by those around us. For example, I might think that I want to become an author, but as people share their own perceived value of that goal (e.g. "you can't make money doing that") it can erode my own sense of its value.

I find that it's hard to hold onto our own priorities in terms of the relative values of goals, as we all to some extent seek validation and/or support from others for our choices.

Or is this what is meant by "strategic selection of social reference group" in (a)?

Now I've got to read the article! :-)

mildadhd
03-22-15, 01:30 AM
Primary control has functional primacy over secondary control.

Lots of topics I've always wanted to discuss, overtime.

I would like to reread and compare the article more before I post again.



Thanks for the introduction.


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mildadhd
03-22-15, 01:46 AM
It is really interesting to consider and compare the article from the opening post with the information in the link below.

http://emotionresearcher.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/three-levels.jpg


http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0021236






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mildadhd
03-22-15, 02:40 AM
I came across this article... and for me to read most of a scientific paper... ( discovered two new words! ) it must be noteworthy.

LIFE-SPAN THEORY OF CONTROL (http://jpkc.ecnu.edu.cn/fzxlx/pdf/a life span theory of control.pdf)
JUTTA HECKHAUSEN AND RICHARD SCHULZ


Excerpt;




It's NOT ADHD specifically... though for a long time i've wrestled with "environmental factors"... "facilitation"..... "maladaptive coping"...

This article on "Theory of control" goes along way to tying in mindfullness, nurture, and many of the other tangential behavioral contributors.

Any ties/research between the physiological aspect of control and behavioral development ( ADHD ) or if you happen to conjure the energy to read it your observations between this other theories / research would be most appreciated.



In a nutshell ( my words );

"Secondary, ( non-action ) coping mechanisms manifest due to physiological constraints in exercising primary control strategies. These in turn foster internal, often "failsafe/tangential" thinking, often compounding or morphing into other maladaptions".

It seems that individuals who are "guided" in a practical or strategic level behaviorally to continually realign with outcome / self benefit stand better odds more self facilitation throughout life.

Essentially, they get remediation / intervention before major coping control strategies develop. In the above quote it seems likely that many ADHD individuals have an abundance of (b) and the flipside of (c)... there is more interesting stuff within relating to this and behavioral adaption.

I have been meaning to learn and compare more about "intentions-in-actions" and "intention-to-act".

So many interesting topics.

Note there are 3 "levels of control in brain emotion-affective processing"


Table I.

Levels of control in brain emotion-affective processing


1. Primary-process, basic-primordial affects (sub-neocortical)

i) Emotional affects (emotion action systems; intentions-in-actions)

ii) Homeostatic affects (hunger, thirst, etc via brain-body interoceptors)

iii) Sensory affects (sensorially triggered pleasurable-displeasurable feelings)


2. Secondary-process emotions (learning via basal ganglia)

i) Classical conditioning

ii) Instrumental and operant conditioning

iii) Emotional habits


3. Tertiary affects and neocortical “awareness” function

i) Cognitive executive functions: thoughts and planning

ii) Emotional ruminations and regulations

iii) “Free-will” or intention-to-act



Affective neuroscience of the emotional BrainMind: evolutionary perspectives and implications for understanding depression
Jaak Panksepp, PhD
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181986/#!po=8.75000)



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mildadhd
03-28-15, 02:27 PM
Infants and young children are subject to rapid developmental progression. It would be very dysfunctional for them to be locked into any given temporary assessment of their own ability that might become obsolete the next week. (From OP article)

I feel the same way about focusing on much of any thing in the future.

Because tomorrow it is just going to change uncontrollably.

:)


(I have read the article more than a few times, but I better read it a few more times, before discussing)(maybe I am more mature than I think? :) )



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