View Full Version : What is Preverbal Communication


mildadhd
04-12-15, 09:00 PM
hi this thread is meant to learn how infants and special caregivers preverbally communicate before they learn to verbally communicate.

This thread is meant to explore preverbal communication research from the bottom-up, in addition to current top-down verbal communication research.

(This is a no rush to reply or "thank you" thread)

Everyone's positive and negative feelings appreciated.

Let the play begin.




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peripatetic
04-12-15, 10:48 PM
Unsure I qualify as a special caregiver, but thus far my baby communicates through crying if her diaper is soiled or if she didn't get effectively burped and gesturing for food--we feed her as soon as she starts moving her hands to her mouth, making mouth movements, or rooting. I'm reading about using sign language and we're going to try and teach her that, too, but it will be several months before she and we can use it.

She's only three weeks, but I'm really looking forward to her smiling within the month :)

I can find you links to child development things, but I'm on iPhone, so for now I just have my experience to share and not formal research.

What are you looking to discuss about preverbal communication? Is what I wrote above in line with the type of discussion you're looking to have?

She does a lot more I could say, like her cries vary for different things and her cry is identifiable by those who've been around babies (e.g. my father) as being a newborn one...it's more primal sounding than a toddler, for example, but that's all I have time to say right now as it's bath time x

Luvmybully
04-12-15, 11:48 PM
I think of pre-verbal as what Peri described.

The ways infants communicate their wants/needs (which are basically the same thing at this stage)

I have a granddaughter that is 16 weeks old today. She has her ways of letting us know what she needs. Her Mother (my youngest daughter), can tell right away what she needs. Diaper change, bottle, to be walked, etc. Her big brother, who is 4, (will turn 5 April 19th), is also very good at knowing what she needs. I was watching both of them last week, and he told me "Grandma, she is HUNGRY!" I was not real sure, it wasn't that long since her last bottle, but he was so right! She was hungry!

My poor grandbaby is in the hospital. 2nd time in her 3 months of life! She has a real bad case of RSV. Last time it was a stomach virus.

daveddd
04-13-15, 12:40 AM
baby puts off primal emotion

mother reads mind, or theory of mind/mentalizing

mildadhd
04-13-15, 01:36 AM
Unsure I qualify as a special caregiver, but thus far my baby communicates through crying if her diaper is soiled or if she didn't get effectively burped and gesturing for food--we feed her as soon as she starts moving her hands to her mouth, making mouth movements, or rooting. I'm reading about using sign language and we're going to try and teach her that, too, but it will be several months before she and we can use it.

She's only three weeks, but I'm really looking forward to her smiling within the month :)

I can find you links to child development things, but I'm on iPhone, so for now I just have my experience to share and not formal research.

What are you looking to discuss about preverbal communication? Is what I wrote above in line with the type of discussion you're looking to have?

She does a lot more I could say, like her cries vary for different things and her cry is identifiable by those who've been around babies (e.g. my father) as being a newborn one...it's more primal sounding than a toddler, for example, but that's all I have time to say right now as it's bath time x

Yes , all the information anyone can find would be great, Thanks!

( I am also open to any changes in verbal terminology that will help discuss preverbal topics better.)

Every child requires at least one special caregiver, usually a biological parent, but not always. (Will look for better explanations, thoughts appreciated on all these topics and any information/topics that anyone feels important to add to the discussion.)

Any types of preverbal communication, before the ability to verbally communicate.

Involving more fragmented affective implicit preverbal consciousness, before cognitive explicit verbal consciousness.

Conscious primary processes (deeply subcortical, primary affects) and subconscious secondary processes (upper limbic, implicit learning and memories) levels of control. (Before the age of 4*)

As apposed to the conscious primary processes (deeply subcortical), subconscious secondary processes (upper limbic, explicit learning and memories) and conscious tertiary processes (neocortical, awereness and self regulation) levels of control. (After the age of 4*)

*(give or take)

Please leave room for learning. (Work in progress) (no rush, already have lots to consider in these few posts)

I am planning for a long discussion, overtime.

And I also have lots in my head I want to discuss, learning how to discuss preverbal brain mechanisms that evolved before verbal brain mechanism can be a challenge.

Thanks millions everyone.

Good night (passed my bath and bed time)


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daveddd
04-13-15, 04:23 AM
https://books.google.com/books?id=dFVlHcPXq_QC&printsec=frontcover&dq=mentalizing&hl=en&sa=X&ei=NHwrVYn_BYjEggSI_4GgDA&ved=0CEEQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=mentalizing&f=false

the first part of this book that is free has some stuff you're looking for

sarahsweets
04-13-15, 04:55 AM
Winking.;)

Flory
04-13-15, 07:16 AM
I have an adopted friend that talks a lot about this and something she calls the "primal wound" which is a book relating to the mental health of some adoptees from childhood wounds before they were verbal that play out in their daily life as adults.

Said friend is going for a form of therapy called eye movement training I think

Luvmybully
04-13-15, 11:29 AM
In very young babies, besides crying, they use simple body movements to communicate.

Arching their backs, turning their faces, stiffening their legs.

Once they start to smile, it seems like a whole new level of communication.

Kicking and waving their arms, (so delightful to watch!). Cooing and making sounds.

My granddaughter now takes turns "talking". She will watch us and wait for us to finish, then she'll make her sound. I wish I could remember when she started this, but I know it was not long ago.

She also tries to mimic mouth movements. She will stick her tongue out when you blow raspberries at her.

She definitely responds to our joy and delight when we interact with her.

And she is always happy to see her brother. She will even smile at him with tears in her eyes, so strange how she is just thrilled when she sees him!

mildadhd
04-13-15, 11:21 PM
..In the early months, the most important communications between mother and infant are unconscious ones.

Incapable of deciphering the meaning of words, the infant receives messages that are purely emotional.

They are conveyed by the mother's gaze, her tone of voice and her body language..

..Within minutes following birth, the mother's odors stimulate the branching of millions of nerve cells in the newborn's brain.

A six-day-old infant can already distinguish the scent of his mother from that of other women.

Later on, visual inputs associated with emotions gradually take over as the major influences.

By two to seven weeks, the infant will orient toward the mother's face in preference to a stranger's--and also in preference to the father's, unless the father is the mothering adult.

At seventeen weeks, the infant's gaze follows the mother's eyes more closely than her mouth movements..


Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", p 70.



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Luvmybully
04-13-15, 11:32 PM
Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", p 70.



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This is an awesome discussion for me right now, because we just happen to have a new baby in the family.

My granddaughter absolutely knows and prefers her mom over anyone else.

She also has a very strong preference for her brother.

Her father is now a much bigger part of her life, and it shows.

And yes, the moment she makes eye contact with her mom or her brother, that's all she sees. She will turn her head to maintain eye contact with them.

mildadhd
04-20-15, 12:19 AM
In attunement, it is the infant who leads and the mother who follows.

"Where their roles differ is in the timing of their responses," writes John Bowlby, one of the century's great psychiatric researchers. (*6)

The infant initiates the interaction or withdraws from it according to his own rhythms, Bowlby found, while the "mother regulates her behaviour so that it meshes with his... Thus she lets him call the tune and by a skillful interweaving of her own responses with his creates a dialogue."..


-Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", p 73-74.




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