View Full Version : Blog post on Sensory Processing Sensitivity


TygerSan
05-07-15, 09:46 AM
Found this article (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/2015/05/04/shades-of-sensitivity/) interesting.

Personally, I've never really seen myself as fitting the definition of a highly sensitive person, but I hit almost every single one of the items in the "Ease of Excitation" scale. I suspect that many of us with ADHD would as well, and it makes perfect sense why someone who scores high on this index would be, as I explain it, allergic to stress.

I spent many years completely and utterly overwhelmed, yet trying to do everything "right". After college, I think I just got tired of being that stressed all the time and bascially, my threshold for being overwhelmed has decreased ever since.

It's especially interesting that those who scored highest on "Ease of excitation" and "Low sensory threshold" (also me), tended to also score high on neuroticism.

Flory
05-07-15, 10:42 AM
I have what's called a sensory integration dysfunction ;), I still do t fully understand what that means

Lunacie
05-07-15, 11:30 AM
I score low on Aesthetic Sensitivity, which would allow me to embrace
my sensory issues.

I score high on Ease of Excitation and Low Sensory Threshold,
so find my sensory issues to be quite stressful and anxiety provoking.

I first began learning about sensory processing disorder on this forum.
Good article, I'm still learning. :)

Some people with SPD are more sensitive to just one kind of thing,
smells or lights or tastes or texture (tags in clothing, seams in socks)
or sounds. I seem to be equally over-sensitive to all of them.

I don't know for sure if it's related, but I'm also very sensitive to
barometric changes. Yesterday I was keeping an eye on the weather
(one window open to this forum, one window open to our local weather
station).

At one point I mentioned on my profile page that my headache had just
jumped up a notch - and when I checked the weather page, they'd just
posted a tornado watch for our area. ;)

When I was younger I could out-predict the weather forecasters, but they
have become much more skilled and I rely on them much more these days.

TygerSan
05-07-15, 12:50 PM
I have what's called a sensory integration dysfunction ;), I still do t fully understand what that means


You and me both! I got occupational therapy for it when I was a kid. It was so much fun. Jumping and swinging and spinning. Even had a camp in which I was the one who discovered that you could unzip and crawl *inside* the beanbag chairs!

I don know that when I was younger, I could spin and spin without getting the nystagmus (eye-jerking) reaction that most people get. I also had trouble with tags in clothing and seams and stuff (much better as an adult, if anything I'm less sensitive rather than more). I still like to be squeezed, hugged and stuff, and don't like sleeping without a cover or two on top of me, even when it's hot as anything out.

Lunacie
05-07-15, 01:47 PM
You and me both! I got occupational therapy for it when I was a kid. It was so much fun. Jumping and swinging and spinning. Even had a camp in which I was the one who discovered that you could unzip and crawl *inside* the beanbag chairs!

I don know that when I was younger, I could spin and spin without getting the nystagmus (eye-jerking) reaction that most people get. I also had trouble with tags in clothing and seams and stuff (much better as an adult, if anything I'm less sensitive rather than more). I still like to be squeezed, hugged and stuff, and don't like sleeping without a cover or two on top of me, even when it's hot as anything out.

Both my granddaughters were spinners. The oldest (ADHD) outgrew it by
about age 5. The youngest (Autism) was 9 or 10 before she didn't need to
spin anymore. In fact, she's 13 now and still loves to spin - and doesn't get
dizzy - but now she prefers to spin in an office chair instead of standing up.

We were just referred to OT a couple of months ago. Very insteresting
the things they are having her do ... and asking us to do with her at home.
I do wish we'd known about and been able to get into OT when she was
much younger. I also wish I could have had OT as a child, but better late
than never, I'm trying some of the exercises at home myself.

Corina86
05-07-15, 02:16 PM
A quote from the article:

"Prior research has found that aesthetic sensitivity is related to a variety of beneficial outcomes, including greater attention to detail and communication skills (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886908001281), and higher levels of affilitativeness and openness to experience (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886907002723)."

I fit the rest of the descriptions, but not this paragraph...

SB_UK
05-08-15, 03:37 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highly_sensitive_person

Bit confused ?

low sensory threshold was a key aspect in Aron leading to a description of the HSP type.

HSP shyness
learned fear of social judgment
No shyness isn't necessarily fear of anything - not wanting to have one's voice heard - if one cannot add anything useful or if it's clear that anything useful would fall on deaf ears.
Why waste your time ?

sensory-processing sensitivity (SPS) is innate and found in about 15–20% of humans and is characterized by a greater depth of processing of sensory input, leading to a greater awareness of subtletie

Surely greater depth of processing of sensory input is simply a way of saying that sensory input quality is more easily discerned in people with SPS
- problem with sensitivity - is exposure to insensitivity.

So - allergic to stress. <- to be expected
- that's the pained sensory overload in the signature.

Also - higher levels of affilitativeness and openness to experience. to be expected

eg

Who feels chills while listening to music? People “open to experience”
<- experimentally proven some place
http://www.collisiondetection.net/mt/archives/2010/12/who_feels_chill.php

reward system activation through sensitivity to music.


-*-

Simplest possible summary

Evolutionary selection [rewarding experience] for neural structures which can process depth of informational quality = ADHD.

What kinds of informational quality ? Well you can tell by looking at what human beings have been doing in recent times
Ears - eg music but nature is fine - the drive towards higher fidelity recording
Eyes - eg the relentless drive towards higher definition screens
Co-ordination - eg the relentless drive towards realistic computer gaming
Feel - eg the imminent release of virtual reality masks this year - which are mind blowing apparently

[probably lots of examples here]

Communication - ability to actually interprete what people mean when they speak

-*-

what's my problem with selecting for informational quality ?
Well - as mentioned yesterday (and noting that eating tiny amounts of the ultra-high quality food,wine should still be possible)

but as mentioned in Drogheda's video on genius by the lady on the far left

- we live in a world through consumerism, love of money and power - where creativity/quality is demolished.

And why's that a problem ?
Because consumerism is built on the love/desire/appetite/greed for food.

And so I don't see how selection for informational quality is logically consistent with the need to eat food to survive
- important proviso that eating to develop one's own personal sense of quality - which is the essence of 'high cuisine' - will be retained.

It's all about building an internal capacity for discerning quality.
However the last stage of evolution was all about getting our head around how we came to be here (A mechanism to evolution) as we simultaneously appeared to lead ourselves into near extinction.
Still not out of the woods.

Flory
05-08-15, 07:57 AM
Yes TYger Its complicated to understand it .

I think it means that we have trouble processing different kinds of sensory input

I was and am incredibly clumsy. For instance I can't do two motor tasks at the same time if I'm holding a glass of water in one Hand and turning a door handle with the other I tip the water out as the other hand sometimes turns as well

I also struggle with noise and tight spaces like tubes/subways

My anxiety issue has been bad lately which has resulted in my sensory issues triggering panic attacks. A flickering strip light is enough sometimes to push me over the edge .

My family are trying to help me get an OT that specialises in it, unfortunately I didn't get correctly diagnosed with sensory issues until I was 15 and the OT specialist didn't take patients as old as me only kids and during that era (mid 2000s) there wasn't any teen specialists or young adult specialists. Now at 25 I'm trying to find someone that can help. Combined with our ADHD it's a crapshoot :(

Flory
05-08-15, 07:59 AM
Eye movement think is interesting ophthalmologist says I suffer with irlens syndrome and my eyes move too quickly ?
Not sure of the implications of it though the irlens means texts jumps out , patterns jump out and lots of things hurt my eyes to look at.
I am meant to use a purple overlay on text for example

Stevuke79
06-09-15, 01:00 PM
I can relate to this. I've actually become really interested in sensory related disorders and I think they explain me very well. (It's funny, like tyger said, most people who know me wouldn't call me "sensitive".)

I also appreciates explanations of ADHD, Aspergers and Autism that go this road.