View Full Version : a school that specializes in ADHD?


icarusinflames
05-09-15, 05:41 PM
I'm sure this doesn't exist, but the more I think about how a child with ADHD could shine if they were allowed a bit more freedom in creative approaches to displaying knowledge as well as more choice... I wonder if such a program exists.

Imagine how a child could thrive if they were given opportunity to display their knowledge in creative ways (like through art, a comic strip, etc), and especially if the child could pick what topics they would research for the purpose of English essays, or even in the particular subject (given more freedom of what to focus on and write about and study deeper), then the child who has ADHD could shine and show off the obvious areas of gifting more.

Has anyone heard of any programs run in public schools or else some private schools with a high emphasis on creativity for these unusual students like those with ADHD?

neewsmonth
05-12-15, 03:39 AM
Dreaming :)

One of the forums' users, AngelNicki, had started a thread about this, it gathered a few interesting links.

Corina86
05-12-15, 02:43 PM
It would be interesting, but not enough. Certain things have to be taught and you can't always use creativity to learn everything you need to know. My ideal school would have small classes (10 students maybe), so every kid can get more attention and more "personalized" teaching, shorter classes with more breaks, more multimedia (more classes on the computer, video projectors, documentaries, games) and more field trips. And teachers that are actually good at teaching, not just good at the object they're teaching- it's one thing to understand math yourself, it's another to make a kid understand it, especially an ADHD kid. Maybe ADHD teachers might have a better connection with the students.

icarusinflames
05-12-15, 07:57 PM
it's one thing to understand math yourself, it's another to make a kid understand it, especially an ADHD kid. Maybe ADHD teachers might have a better connection with the students.

I absolutely agree with you because there are some things that can never be neglected, even if some of the processes to get to the answer may actually need some visual aids or props to remember how to work through problems.

Learning about ADHD in myself and also in my daughter has been so eye opening towards how to even teach (and I've been teaching her at home since first grade). I realized that I should stop banging my head on the desk while trying to get her to memorize the multiplication tables. I'm just going to hand her a calculator, and I may also try to teach her to use an abacus for a different approach at times. She already does great using number lines, blocks and many of the cool things that her math program has included. So her understanding of math concepts is on the "Mastery" level, but then working problems is like pulling teeth.

There's so much more hope to gear up my individual curriculum with her, but I would love to find a school to enroll her in for High School at least!

icarusinflames
05-12-15, 07:58 PM
Dreaming :)

One of the forums' users, AngelNicki, had started a thread about this, it gathered a few interesting links.

Thanks I will check that out!

ccom5100
05-12-15, 10:15 PM
There is a private school (very expensive) in our area for kids with adhd, anxiety, and other special needs. From what I've read on their website, they would probably be a close fit to the type of school you are describing. I don't think it goes past 8th grade, though. I think you could easily design a good homeschool curriculum for her if that's a consideration.

TygerSan
05-13-15, 08:29 AM
I think that homeschooling can be a bit of a crap shoot. I could see it working really well for some, but I think that even at 5 years old, my mom and I would have killed each other. Parent-child dynamic is a tricky thing to navigate.

kilted_scotsman
07-03-15, 08:37 AM
Are there Steiner schools in the US? They would seem to be more ADHD friendly.....
but once again it's down to chance because much depends on the staff.

someothertime
07-03-15, 09:55 AM
was also going to suggest looking at the Steiner model.

TygerSan
07-03-15, 04:46 PM
If they are the same as Waldorf schools then yes and referred to by that name more than Steiner. Most are probably private and therefore cost also.

Silvermoonstone
08-08-15, 10:31 PM
Actually, I remember there is a college somewhere in California for students with learning disabilities, includeing ADHD. But it was extremely expensive. And if I'm not mistaken, it was aimed for students who simply couldn't get assistance within the regular college setups.

I....forgot what it's called though. Sorry!

ADaptHD
08-08-15, 11:40 PM
Landmark College (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landmark_College) seems like they're doing a good job with this at the college level. They have low student-teacher ratios, lots of support services, etc. Of course, all that costs money, so the tuition ends up being restrictive.

Besides what's already been mentioned, I could also see arts magnet schools being a good fit for creatively inclined ADHDers at the high-school level.

testaccommodati
10-13-15, 06:04 PM
I believe Landmark college and Beacon college focus on students with learning differences.

http://www.landmark.edu/
http://www.beaconcollege.edu/

tash11
03-15-16, 07:22 PM
I'm sure this doesn't exist, but the more I ... and especially if the child could pick what topics they would research ...

This is called "child led learning" or "unschooling".

I know, it sounds like nothing. But in todays world of information everywhere it actually works easily and well.

I know a whole group of 'unschoolers'. Their kids are very smart, polite, and well informed. Kids learn best when they are interested and engaged (ADHD or not).

There are many ways of doing child led learning. You can ask them what they want to learn and then find things for them that focus on that. You can let them find their own way entirely and just expose them to various things by taking them to the zoo and art classes and whatever. (which is a very add approach to life-just randomly wondering about to whatever shiny thing you see). I have even known a few unschool parents whose child wanted to know what a public school was like and so they went there.

I do a hybrid of child led and more structured. My daughter has a 'workbook' of pages I have found for her online and at the dollar store and other places. She can choose the order she does it. She has a checklist of each subject each day and she has to mark them all off. But if she gets really into a topic, like recently it's been science, she can do that for a few days and get ahead in science. She can also do non-workbook stuff and count that. Like if she wants to bake, that is math or science (chemistry), it also involves reading and following directions. I talk to her about how the leavening works and what substitutions work and why.

Today she went and tried to catch frogs, she also wrote a short story and we talked about parts of a story and how to write effectively. Then it was nice outside so we blew bubbles and talked a bit about how the temperature affects which way the bubbles go (up or down). Tonight she will probably continue watching her 'bed time documentary' series she found on youtube. I was hoping to watch Mary Poppins and talk about the suffrage movement before bed, but we will see.....


I think that homeschooling can be a bit of a crap shoot. I could see it working really well for some, but I think that even at 5 years old, my mom and I would have killed each other. Parent-child dynamic is a tricky thing to navigate.

Public school can be a crap shoot. It can work really well for some. Teacher children dynamic is a crap shoot every year for 13 years.

;)

Cyllya
03-16-16, 12:01 AM
Imagine how a child could thrive if they were given opportunity to display their knowledge in creative ways (like through art, a comic strip, etc), and especially if the child could pick what topics they would research for the purpose of English essays, or even in the particular subject (given more freedom of what to focus on and write about and study deeper), then the child who has ADHD could shine and show off the obvious areas of gifting more.

Has anyone heard of any programs run in public schools or else some private schools with a high emphasis on creativity for these unusual students like those with ADHD?

Ehh, I think I would have done much worse in a school like that! All it does is make the assignments have vaguer requirements and consume more energy. I have ADHD, people call me creative, and most of my hopes/dreams/passions involve creating, but I usually hated pretty much any attempt the school made to involve "creativity." Forced creativity is not anywhere near as fun as normal creativity!

I "did well" in school, which means I got good grades and didn't cause any trouble for authority figures. I learned and even remember all the stuff people complain schools aren't teaching kids, I ended up without any job skills or life skills.

After researching it later, I realized school is actually pretty inconsequential. It's the parents that matter. Most kids who get good grades get good grades because their parents make it happen (help them with homework, organize things for them, make sure their home life is conducive to school, whatever). Most kids who grow up to be successful adults do so because their parents teach them how (even if it's just by setting a good example). I have a high IQ but loser parents (sorry, Mom!), so I got good grades, then crashed and burned in adulthood.

The above is why "unschooling" works. For the most part, unschooling doesn't involve doing anything in particular. It's the same thing all good parents do on weekends and breaks, except they get to do a lot more of it, with less stress, because school doesn't get in the way, and those kids turn out fine. Heck, I'm pretty sure even I would have turned out less bad if I'd been unschooled, despite my parents' issues.

If you like unschooling but need to send your kid somewhere everyday (for "socialization," or because you work, or anything) or want school-related resources, there is a concept called free school or democratic school or Sudbury school. Unfortunately, they are very rare. Also worth considering is unschooling plus hiring a babysitter.

I'm pro-unschooling (or anti-school, rather), but if you're going to stick to something that bares any resemblance to traditional school, the least of evils is to just give the kids worksheets to fill out and let them save their creative energy for their time off.

Caco3girl
03-16-16, 09:18 AM
I'm sure this doesn't exist, but the more I think about how a child with ADHD could shine if they were allowed a bit more freedom in creative approaches to displaying knowledge as well as more choice... I wonder if such a program exists.

Imagine how a child could thrive if they were given opportunity to display their knowledge in creative ways (like through art, a comic strip, etc), and especially if the child could pick what topics they would research for the purpose of English essays, or even in the particular subject (given more freedom of what to focus on and write about and study deeper), then the child who has ADHD could shine and show off the obvious areas of gifting more.

Has anyone heard of any programs run in public schools or else some private schools with a high emphasis on creativity for these unusual students like those with ADHD?

Have you heard of a Montessori school? This is off of Wikipedia to explain the principle:

Montessori education is an educational (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education) approach developed by Italian physician and educator Maria Montessori (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Montessori) based on her extensive research with "phrenasthenic" or "special needs" children and characterized by an emphasis on independence, freedom within limits, and respect for a child’s natural psychological (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychology), physical, and social development.

I sent my daughter to their pre-K program. She learned fairly complex things while never feeling she was in school. It allowed free thinking and freedom of movement. If you didn't like the activity others were doing there were suitable replacements that taught the same concept in a different way and kids could just get up without being scolded. They never told a kid they were doing it wrong, as long as they got to the right answer.

Stevuke79
03-16-16, 10:37 AM
Many schools are adopting an approach like this. Regardless of learning disabilities most children do better like this.

I think it's still mainly in private schools that can invest in developing new programs and structures but you see it more and more in public schools
as well.

My daughter goes to a school with a somewhat non traditional model.

Caco3girl
03-16-16, 02:17 PM
Many schools are adopting an approach like this. Regardless of learning disabilities most children do better like this.

I think it's still mainly in private schools that can invest in developing new programs and structures but you see it more and more in public schools
as well.

My daughter goes to a school with a somewhat non traditional model.

My ADHD 8th grader has two of his classes in a co-taught atmosphere. I asked him what the second teacher did and his response was "It's mostly her job to tap us on the shoulder when we start daydreaming and remind us to focus on the teacher, or sometimes when one of us REALLY doesn't get something she takes us out in the hall so she can explain it more while the rest of the class carries on."

This is a public school but I imagine it is very expensive to have TWO teachers per class.

Stevuke79
03-16-16, 02:33 PM
I would call that more of a traditional model even with the second teacher in the room.

Some alternative models attempt to reduce human capital and cost while also delivering a better education, particularly to special needs students. It's cheaper and more interactive than a 'lecture based ' model.

Stevuke79
03-16-16, 02:35 PM
My child is in a school with a variation of 'blended learning '. It's meant to be reduce expenses while offering a better education.

casper
04-30-16, 09:51 AM
Landmark college does a high school summer program. May be worth checking out. Very expensive, but if it helps the kidselarn the "right way" and gives them some stratigies to help in public school it could be worth while

seemingly
04-30-16, 02:56 PM
I think having a special ADD school would be a marginalizing for the kiddies. When they grow up there is not going to be an ADD-specific job, or ADD-specific spouse pool for them. ADD school, how isolating! (depression school? OCD school?)
It is OK if they find some things tough. Other, "normal" (whatever that means?) kids are challenged by studies, teachers, relationships as well. That is just part of life. Childhood is probably the safest time for them to be in a "mixed" environment - after all, there *is* a lot of support, guidance and supervision.
If they are herded into a special class now, when do you unherd them? When they're 30? 40?

Socaljaxs
05-01-16, 08:40 AM
I remember watching an episode on the own network, called "Our America with Lisa Ling" Season 4,Episode-404 titled The ADHD Explosion

They spoke about a child that went to an ADHD specialized school called The Hunter School. However, I googled it and the school shut down last year:(. But, if that school existed I'm sure others like this may exist as well.... and from the looks of it the hunter school seemed amazing and peaceful and something that is helpful and encouraging environments.

Plus, one really interesting point made in the episode, the episode mentioned, that since the child's previous school district to didn't have or offer, the proper resources to offer help/provide proper and needed assistance to the child, the school/school district had to pay for the child to attend this school.

From the schools website-
The Hunter School is a non-profit private therapeutic day and residential school offering a unique approach to educating young boys and girls with ADHD, Anxiety, High Functioning Autism, Mood Disorders and related conditions who have not found success in more traditional educational settings. We consider these children to be highly sensitive, very intelligent and to possess many positive attributes, creative abilities and skills which are celebrated on our campus.

The Hunter School is also the home of Energetic Mindfulness™ and the Salem Philosophy. The Salem Philosophy embodies the vegetarian diet, connection with nature, lack of electronic stimulation and a deep respect for one another and the planet. The distinctive methodology of EM™ showcases and models the tremendous benefits of paying attention in the present moment, being mindful of and self-regulating the impact that our thoughts, behaviors and attitudes have on us, others and the world around us.

Our Permaculture program further enhances our philosophies and program by allowing children the opportunity to learn about organic farming, sustainability and and most important of all the importance of the relationship we all have with each other and the planet.

At the Hunter School, our classrooms and living quarters reflect our philosophies and are designed to be safe and relaxed, creating a welcoming place for your child to thrive while he or she attends our program.

Our goals are to:


* Nourish the child’s creativity and strengthen his or her ability to learn.

* Re-engage each child in the world with trust and love.

* Reduce or eliminate the use of psychotropic drugs whenever possible.

We offer a specialized program for students with ADHD, Anxiety, High Functioning Autism, Mood, Sensory and related conditions. Our educational program is focused around ready-to-learn (RTL) skills, communication skills, social skills, and academic skills. The school has guidelines that each student has the opportunity to follow. The child’s objectives are individualized and incorporated into the IEP (Individualized Educational Plan) or HEP (Hunter Educational Plan) as goals to work on throughout the school year.

Our therapeutic model is a family style environment, monitored and guided by clinical staff. Six children live in a house with two parents. Each child’s program is individually based on a comprehensive developmental assessment. House rules are simple and parallel those of a typical family. The close relationships children develop with the house parents is one of the primary vehicles for growth and healing. Our extraordinary staff works closely with each child to further support and enhance positive growth and development.