View Full Version : Vocalization issues.


jopie90
05-16-15, 12:54 AM
Do you guys have trouble when talking to other people? For example. I constantly garble up words or loose what I'm about to say. When I talk to people I am uncomfortable around and am asked a question, I freeze and struggle to come up with an answer or it gets mixed up when I'm talking and doesn't make sense?

If so, any suggestions on how to improve upon this? I hate always looking stupid because I can never seam to get my point across.

KnuteKlutz
05-16-15, 10:42 AM
What does your mind sound like when this happens?

I've had this exact problem my entire life. I believe it's a mixture of the impaired impulse control and highly transcendental thinking associated with ADHD, as well as a myriad of ADHD-affected life experiences that caused a lot of guilt, shame, self-consciousness and anxiety for me. I miss words, reverse the structure of my sentences, use correct but unusual vocabulary, etc. I imagine it's quite similar for you?

I remember one time when I was a schoolboy, my mom drove me to the photocopier to get some homework done. I spent almost an hour with my *** bolted to the car seat, rehearsing lines in my head and trying to get over my speech anxiety so I could ask for a couple pages copied. My mom, thinking it was best that I learn how to talk to people, refused to help and was yelling in frustration by the end of it.

What's actually going on in my mind all the time is 2-3 concurrent trains of thought. There's me, the devil's advocate, and the devil's advocate's super-talkative court jester. Sometimes they wait for each other to finish their sentences, sometimes one of them jumps ahead in the story while another is speaking, and sometimes they all speak at the same time. When I try to focus, they start to bicker loudly and quickly. I get anxious and focus harder, which backfires, because they've now doubled in intensity. My brain is working harder than ever, calculating which of a couple appropriate choices will provide the best of a dozen possible outcomes socially, rhetorically, morally and intellectually. By the time I'm done, the other person is offended, confused or has run out of patience waiting for me to string a sentence together. Or I've completely lost my train of thought and now look like a ponderous fool.

Damn it! Got to try even harder next time, right?

Well, no. We all know how that turns out, don't we? By the time I was desperate enough to see a shrink, I was socially withdrawn and talking was painfully difficult. Literally painful. He diagnosed me with ADHD PI, and this was one of the things I brought up. Being ADHD himself, he understood me perfectly and gave me a few precious nuggets of wisdom which I carry with me every day:

1. Use medication if you aren't already.

It may not fix all your problems, but it will help you figure out how to organize your thoughts. What I've learned while on medication stays with me when I'm off it.

2. Speak first, apologize later.

Unless you're a genuine douchebag, most of the things you say won't be that terrible. We may be eccentric, but not irrational. Be your normal quirky self - it is every bit as valid as a neurotypical person. Yes, some people may find that off-putting. F*** them, they're most likely boring, intolerant people and not worth your time. If you do happen to say something actually offensive, own up to it, say sorry, learn from it but never look back. Maybe you lose a few 'friends' this way, but knowing who really accepts you for yourself is priceless.

3. You're the only person who cares as much as you do.

We ADHD people tend to be sensitive, thin-skinned people. We can't help but feel everything. It hurts every time we're shamed, and we have a long memory for emotions. So it's understandable that every time we speak, we feel a bitter tinge of that cocktail of negative emotions and it trips us up. The endless what-if's and should-haves are hard to choke down. The important thing to realise that this looks like a lot of unnecessary vacillation and worrying to a normal person, and they're right. They're usually more concerned with their own behaviour than yours. Most people will give you a chance to clarify yourself or rephrase something you said impulsively, . Total strangers won't even remember you 5 minutes after talking to you. You have to actually try pretty hard to permanently screw up your relationships.

4. Travel.

Use the fact that nobody at your destination knows you or will remember you to get brave. Compliment, comment, suggest, request whenever you feel like it. See what happens. You'll probably be surprised how well you do. If you do make mistakes, learn from them. Finding out what your limits are is crucial to learn how to balance your behaviour. I spent 4 months abroad (work trip, so affordable for me, but whatever suits you, just get out of your town) and when I came back my shrink remarked that I seemed a lot more confident and sure of myself. The best part is I didn't even realise how much I improved.

These are the things that helped me, but the best advice I can give you is to look for a counselor, psychologist or psychiatrist who truly understands how the ADHD mind works or specializes in that field. They will have a different perspective on your condition and help fix your unique maladaptive thought patterns from the outside.

MikhailTal
05-16-15, 02:46 PM
Think of the positive aspects of your problems. I have difficulties reading, writing and speaking too, but whenever I am passionate about something, it feel like I'm a fantastic reader, writer and spokesman (it really doesn't matter to me whether it's only a feeling or the truth). Perhaps you are similar, or maybe there are other positive sides you can find.

When I'm having difficulties speaking, I try to slow myself down. Sometimes I just want to combine too many pieces information, in one sentence, which is common I believe among people with ADHD. Let the people you're speaking to wait; take just a few extra seconds, in order to figure out what is the most important, and how to say it as concise as possible.

KnuteKlutz
05-16-15, 03:08 PM
Those are great points Mikhail. Once I start speaking about something I'm passionate about, I become a lot more eloquent, the words come smoothly, and I can communicate ideas with a very rare kind of clarity.

Don't be shy about pausing for a few seconds to contemplate a response, but also in taking your time in letting the words come out on their own as you speak them. Let each word carry its weight before moving on to the next. Don't give into the temptation to rush.

Kunga Dorji
05-16-15, 05:37 PM
Do you guys have trouble when talking to other people? For example. I constantly garble up words or loose what I'm about to say. When I talk to people I am uncomfortable around and am asked a question, I freeze and struggle to come up with an answer or it gets mixed up when I'm talking and doesn't make sense?

If so, any suggestions on how to improve upon this? I hate always looking stupid because I can never seam to get my point across.

I find there are 2 problems
clumsy speech- dysarthria.
That one only bites me sometimes and usually only for the first few words.
Need to work on the elocution and be as mindful of it a I can.

Problem 2 is the tangential sometimes circumstantial speech I used to have.
Curiously this has improved greatly after a year of TaiChi.

I have recently seen this problem described in a neuropsychology book as Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.
So much of Tai Chi Qi Gong involves very precise integration of movement across the whole limb and the whole body- so I can see that it makes sense that that should affect the cerebellum.
It has really amazed me though to see how much more fluidity it has brought to my thinking and speeeh.

BellaVita
05-16-15, 09:32 PM
Do you guys have trouble when talking to other people? For example. I constantly garble up words or loose what I'm about to say. When I talk to people I am uncomfortable around and am asked a question, I freeze and struggle to come up with an answer or it gets mixed up when I'm talking and doesn't make sense?

If so, any suggestions on how to improve upon this? I hate always looking stupid because I can never seam to get my point across.

Yes, I tend to either freeze up and lose the ability to speak or I just end up saying some memorized script, which might or might not apply to the situation.

If it's an anxiety issue, perhaps talk to your doctor about prescribing benzos because they can truly be life savers. I talk to people with much less anxiety and freezing up when I take Clonazepam.

I also suggest memorizing different types of situations and then memorize appropriate responses.

jopie90
05-17-15, 01:12 AM
KnuteKlutz,

I am not quite sure what goes on in my mind when it happens, I can tell you a few experiences though to see if that helps. I think a lot of my issues are from the social anxiety I have developed over the last couple of years. In all honesty, I struggle to understand how to talk to people. I constantly struggle with small talk and it has lead to me having a select list of sayings that I have with people I see on a regular basis. However, I get paranoid that they get bored of hearing these sayings, or that they wonder why I never branch out from those phrases to try and actually get to know people. Every time I see these people I instantly freak out and that probably leads to me actually mixing things up.

When I talk to people I am comfortable with, I tend to get over excited and blurt things out. I freak out about saying something stupid and am being judged, that I actually start mix things up. I have recently have gotten myself so worked up by this that I haven't hung out with my friends in months.

Like you, when I start to freak out, my brain tries to go into hyper drive to fix the problem, but it usually makes things worse.

Now as far as medication, I am currently on wellbutrin and citalopram. My family practice doctor says that I have inattentive adhd with some anxiety added to it. However, she doesn't like the stimulant side of adhd medication so she tried giving me wellbutrin. I plan on actually going to a psychologist in the next few weeks. However, I don't think my insurance covers seeing them. Am I going to need to have several visits to get this resolved? Or is this something that takes a couple of visits to get sorted out and then the occasional visit to check up on the medication? I assume that the first visit is going to cost at least $200 and $150 for each visit after that. I just don't want this to end up costing 1000+ dollars to get resolved.

MikhailTal,

Thanks for the advise you have given, I definitely will try taking a few extra seconds to try and sort out my thoughts. I bet it will do wonders!

Kunga Dorji,

I have heard about meditation helping people talk more clearly, but not TaiChi. But I guess TaiChi is a form of meditation that involves moving, right? I feel like both are extremely hard for people with adhd. With both involving clearing the mind, this has to be a huge struggle for people who just struggle to control their thoughts in general.

jopie90
05-17-15, 01:26 AM
BellaVita,

I take Wellbutrin and Citalopram. Now, I don't think either are considered benzos, but I think Citalopram is supposed to help with anxiety. However, if benzos are supposed to help more, I will ask about it on my next visit.

stef
05-17-15, 02:46 AM
you can pause and gather your thoughts, its ok. I still have problems with this. Like asking for something in a store, by the time i get from home to store i have a million thoughts and what i say comes out garbled. but for us that instant of stopping and collecting yourself ( either before speaking or after saying an insane sounding sentence), seems like a huge pause like you are trying to stop the entire universe but actually its like 2 seconds and people dont really even notice this.

KnuteKlutz
05-17-15, 05:15 AM
Jopie, I am a lot like you in this regard. You are eloquent in writing, so have faith that learning to speak well is just a matter of unlocking an obstruction in your mind.

TL;DR: Stop worrying about what to say and just say it. It will be okay. Also, get drugs.

Long version:

KnuteKlutz,

I am not quite sure what goes on in my mind when it happens, I can tell you a few experiences though to see if that helps. I think a lot of my issues are from the social anxiety I have developed over the last couple of years. In all honesty, I struggle to understand how to talk to people. I constantly struggle with small talk and it has lead to me having a select list of sayings that I have with people I see on a regular basis. However, I get paranoid that they get bored of hearing these sayings, or that they wonder why I never branch out from those phrases to try and actually get to know people. Every time I see these people I instantly freak out and that probably leads to me actually mixing things up.

Small chat sucks. Been there, tried it. The problem is neurotypical people already expect some mundane response. We have trouble understanding why anyone would bother saying anything meaningless, but for them, the responses aren't really that important, it's about establishing a cadence before moving onto the real meat of the conversation.

Instead of trying to fit in, my advice is to be yourself. There is nothing to be gained by faking it. You'll just end up exhausted holding all your quirks in, and then wonder why you sound boring to other people. Isn't that ironic? :)

Use ADHD to your advantage by talking about the first thing that comes to mind instead of wasting time on small chat. This makes you refreshingly unpredictable, maybe even more interesting to talk to.

Talk about one of the hobbies you just spent time on (we have many).


"What's been up?"

"Ugh, tired, I stayed up late getting this beef bourguignon just right."

Share your unique perspective:


"What's the matter with all this rain?"

"I love it! The noise, the humidity, the reflections. The city just comes alive with it."

Talk about something you care about in the other person:


"What do you do for a living?"

"Ah, it's boring, you don't wanna talk to me about that. You look pretty well-travelled, where was the last place you visited?"


Make an observation about that person's mood or appearance (we notice everything):


"I keep telling my boss, the team needs time to adjust to the new brief, bla bla bla"

"Yeah, you look exhausted. I could probably rest my glass on your eye bags. Maybe you should take a holiday.

KnuteKlutz,
When I talk to people I am comfortable with, I tend to get over excited and blurt things out. I freak out about saying something stupid and am being judged, that I actually start mix things up. I have recently have gotten myself so worked up by this that I haven't hung out with my friends in months.

I am EXACTLY the same. Yes, I get burned a lot when I have to be told by friends to behave. I spent most of my life thinking I was dumber and less mature than everyone else.

I'm no longer friends with the people who think it's okay to make you feel that way.

I want you to realize that you're not stupid or weird, you're just ahead of the curve. You make connections other people don't. You solve problems by asking unusual questions and making unexpected assertions. Those are the characteristics of a leader, not an outsider.

When people judge you, they're applying pressure on you to conform to a social standard. They are emotionally invested in playing by these rules, and feel threatened by people who don't. Social standards change over time and are different everywhere in the world. There is no absolute right way to behave. Quit being a victim of society and be the boss that you are, or find friends who care about your ideas and self esteem rather than how much you embarrass them.

KnuteKlutz,
Like you, when I start to freak out, my brain tries to go into hyper drive to fix the problem, but it usually makes things worse.

Now as far as medication, I am currently on wellbutrin and citalopram. My family practice doctor says that I have inattentive adhd with some anxiety added to it. However, she doesn't like the stimulant side of adhd medication so she tried giving me wellbutrin. I plan on actually going to a psychologist in the next few weeks. However, I don't think my insurance covers seeing them. Am I going to need to have several visits to get this resolved? Or is this something that takes a couple of visits to get sorted out and then the occasional visit to check up on the medication? I assume that the first visit is going to cost at least $200 and $150 for each visit after that. I just don't want this to end up costing 1000+ dollars to get resolved.


Why does your doctor dislike stimulants? Not to presume to know better than a professional, but if your doctor has some built-in biases about medication, it can prevent her from prescribing you something that fits. Make sure your new doctor is a psychiatrist, as those are the ones that are authorized to prescribe medication. A psychologist can be a great help, but they will not be able to dispense any chemical-based treatment.

Yes, too much stimulation can make you jittery, and exacerbate an underlying problem with anxiety. However with the right dosage, it can help you supress those nagging thoughts and see things objectively. This is in addition to improving the aspects that caused the anxiety in the first place. I saw my shrink for anxiety, but we ended up working more on my ADHD once it was clear my medication had fixed most of my problems. Just knowing that I'm more in control helps a ton.

I don't know about the healthcare in your area, but I can share my experience with you here in Australia. My psychologist was covered 50% for 10 sessions a year, and cost me $75 each. He worked on my cognitive patterns, the stuff you can fix with reflection and effort. For the chemical side, my psychiatrist was partially covered by insurance, but I was still forking out AU$200 (roughly equivalent to USD) per session. It hurt my wallet, but never once did I feel cheated; it was worth every penny. The psychiatrist was very serious about her work, and had such deep knowledge about the ADHD that it felt like she was describing my life story. She didn't play around, confirmed my psychologist's diagnosis, and I got a prescription by the end of the first session, with my promise to titrate responsibly and make notes on my reaction to the drug. We scheduled a couple more visits to check on how well I was doing with the medication, and to see if another drug would be a better fit for me. After that, knowing that she wasn't exactly cheap she advised me to ask my GP (free under Aussie healthcare) to handle my prescriptions and to check in maybe once a year to keep the GP happy about prescribing a controlled drug.

Knowing how destructive untreated ADHD has been for me, and how much the medication alone has helped me, I would have paid three times what I did to my psycho+psychia without blinking. This year I got a promotion and a big raise that more than covers everything I spent seeking treatment. I know in my gut that I wouldn't have gotten here without it; I simply wasn't capable of handling the responsibility before.

By all means switch psychiatrists if you feel they're not working for you or dragging out the process to pad their fees, but a good one is some of the best money you'll ever spend.

If this is something you can't afford, is asking for support from your parents an option? Maybe you could get a loan from a friend?

I currently take Ritalin, which is stimulating. Instead of feeling hopped up like a normal person would if they took it, it actually calms me down. Speech wise, it helps me by:

1. Making it easier to think and make decisions.

Ever notice some droning sound like an old fridge, but only after it stops? Your head feels lighter and clearer all of a sudden. With ADHD there's often this mental 'noise' that doesn't have the distinct sound, but feels the same way. Just like with electronic noise, like in digital cameras (graininess) or audio equipment (hiss), the stronger the noise, the harder it is to pick out the real information. This is exactly how it works for my brain, which is really just a electrochemical computer. After 28 years unmedicated, I discovered for the first time that there's a constant buzzing going on in my head that only goes away when I take my meds. It helps with indecision, and phrasing your words more confidently.

2. Making it easier to slow myself down.

While on Ritalin, it's much easier to hold back and speak at a pace that I can cope with. The slower I go, the easier it is for me to know where I'm going.

3. Improving short-term memory.

Better memory means I can hold a narrative in my head for longer, and draw references between the different things you say. It also means I'm less tempted to rush because I might forget to say something that I haven't remembered to say for weeks.

4. I don't need to get excited to focus.

Becoming excited about something helps us focus. so we let the sensation run away from us. Unfortunately, hyperfocus isn't always the best response, and we get loud or forget to give other people a chance to talk. A stimulant like Ritalin boosts norepinephrine levels which gives you the same focus you get when you're excited; This reduces the need for hyperactivity - an adaptation to being under-stimulated all the time.

Kunga Dorji
05-17-15, 01:35 PM
KnuteKlutz,

Kunga Dorji,

I have heard about meditation helping people talk more clearly, but not TaiChi. But I guess TaiChi is a form of meditation that involves moving, right? I feel like both are extremely hard for people with adhd. With both involving clearing the mind, this has to be a huge struggle for people who just struggle to control their thoughts in general.

It is precisely the fact that they are hard that makes them worth doing.

If it was easy-- why bother?-- you already know how to do it.

If it is hard- that defines it as an area that needs improvement.
It is precisely the fact that it is hard that makes it interesting and useful.

Unless you are faint hearted.

Siting meditation is harder for ADDers than Tai Chi / Qi Gong-- we like to move. Our bodies tell us we need to move in a world that values stasis.
However the neural networks that support movement are the same ones that support attention.

John Ratey a psychiatrist with ADHD who specialises in exercise and mental health is very specific in favouring martial arts for ADHD.

jopie90
05-17-15, 02:00 PM
Thanks KnuteKlutz for all of your advice. I will try your tips for conversation and see how it worked.

I am glad I have a group of people to relate to! So far it's been super helpful!

Now my doctor hates the stimulant side of ADHD medication because of how it is being abused in the U.S. for college students. I don't know if that is an issue in Australia, but I guess it is pretty bad here.

I would assume that a psychiatrist would be better about this just because they should be better about accurately diagnosing ADHD when compared to a general doctor.

Is there anything I should expect when going in for an appointment? I have made a list of symptoms for ADHD and social anxiety that I have with set examples. I wanted to make sure all my concerns were shown because I know I will go on there and not be able to convey things the way I want to.

Money isn't really an issue, I just didn't want appoints to build up and I end up spending way more than I need too. It's good to know that most places only require a few appointments to get things worked out. And I'm sure I could ask my family for help if I needed too, I just didn't want to ask them if I didn't have to.

I am looking forward to getting medicated to see how things improve. I have heard that they help with insomnia issues. I guess being able to organize your thoughts make it easier for you to fall asleep. So I hope that helps with that as well! And I'm sure that being able to speak more clearly will help with some of the anxiety I have built.

jopie90
05-17-15, 02:02 PM
Kunga Dorji,

You make a very good point! I will have to try it and see how it works. Do you go somewhere to learn Thaichi or have you just taught yourself by using the Internet?

Kunga Dorji
05-17-15, 06:07 PM
It is precisely the fact that they are hard that makes them worth doing.

If it was easy-- why bother?-- you already know how to do it.

If it is hard- that defines it as an area that needs improvement.
It is precisely the fact that it is hard that makes it interesting and useful.

Unless you are faint hearted.

Siting meditation is harder for ADDers than Tai Chi / Qi Gong-- we like to move. Our bodies tell us we need to move in a world that values stasis.
However the neural networks that support movement are the same ones that support attention.

John Ratey a psychiatrist with ADHD who specialises in exercise and mental health is very specific in favouring martial arts for ADHD.

To add to this - look up WIkipedia on developmental coordination disorder.
This is active in at least 1/2 of all ADDers and it causes great issues with remembering complex motor progreams like speech.

These issues manifest through cerebellar dysfunction.

Tai Chi effectively can be regarde as a form of cerebellar rehabilitation.

The other issue that is relevant is that a lot of the expressive issues in ADHD are actually better describable as "Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome"

jman05
05-17-15, 08:46 PM
I often have the same problem. I think it simply related to our information processing issues. The information gets gobbled up in our brains on the way to our mouths, but I don't always have this problem. I also have issues speaking clearly and annunciation many times. However, I can articulate my thoughts great through written communication because I can do it at my brains own speed and review it. I think speaking moves information just a little too fast through my add brain and it doesn't get processed correctly.

KnuteKlutz
05-18-15, 11:26 AM
I am glad I have a group of people to relate to! So far it's been super helpful!

I know, right?


Now my doctor hates the stimulant side of ADHD medication because of how it is being abused in the U.S. for college students. I don't know if that is an issue in Australia, but I guess it is pretty bad here.

Yes, I've heard about it. I don't know if it's people faking it to qualify, or psych's being too loose with their diagnoses. :umm1: It wasn't exactly easy for me to get mine either; my GP wouldn't prescribe anything without my psychiatrist's recommendation, and I can only purchase one box at a time, which lasts maybe 2-4 weeks.

I would assume that a psychiatrist would be better about this just because they should be better about accurately diagnosing ADHD when compared to a general doctor.

Yes, I would imagine they'd be a lot more confident with their assessment of you.


Is there anything I should expect when going in for an appointment? I have made a list of symptoms for ADHD and social anxiety that I have with set examples. I wanted to make sure all my concerns were shown because I know I will go on there and not be able to convey things the way I want to.

That is what I do with my shrink. Yes, that is very smart. That said, I totally forgot to do it on my first visit. Thankfully, he didn't stamp "fraud" on my file and throw me out, because I couldn't remember any of the symptoms I supposedly believed I had, or verbalize my other problems clearly.

Fortunately, the DSM-V* has a section for ADHD diagnostic criteria, and that's used around the world including Australia. This is one of the references he used to diagnose me, reading out from it and asking me if I related to the symptoms.

There are also a couple of semi-standardized self-reporting questionnaires available to doctors. I'm fairly sure you'll be asked to fill in one or two of these. Don't worry; they're easy, and they don't require you to talk or remember anything specific.

Treating you is their job. Both my doctors were experienced with ADHD, and were remarkably precise in guessing what kind of problems I was having. Typically I'd say a few words, and they'd finish the whole paragraph for me. Huge weight off my shoulders.

It also had the side effect of convincing me that I wasn't being weak and absolving myself of my failures with an imaginary illness - what I had was real, and not only was a complete stranger describing it to a 'T', they'd seen it in countless other patients too. If you really have ADHD, your doctor will catch a whiff of it scary fast.

Just as an example, my psychiatrist pointed out that I was holding my hands under my armpits, and that I'd crossed my legs tightly during the first session. She asked me if I did that to restrain a compulsion to move them. I had an odd moment of realisation before saying "Yes!". It was just some unconscious habit of mine that I never thought about, or even wondered why I did it. She nodded understandingly and made a note.


Money isn't really an issue, I just didn't want appoints to build up and I end up spending way more than I need too. It's good to know that most places only require a few appointments to get things worked out. And I'm sure I could ask my family for help if I needed too, I just didn't want to ask them if I didn't have to.

If I may suggest: consider seeing a psychologist regularly during or after sorting out your meds. They're cheaper than psychiatrists, and will be able to help with your speech in other ways. Both my doctors recommended each other, because a combined approach is better than one alone. My psychiatrist put it wisely. To paraphrase:

"The medication will help improve your thinking; use it to learn the skills you have trouble with."

It's not called a learning disability for nothing.


I am looking forward to getting medicated to see how things improve. I have heard that they help with insomnia issues. I guess being able to organize your thoughts make it easier for you to fall asleep. So I hope that helps with that as well! And I'm sure that being able to speak more clearly will help with some of the anxiety I have built.

The thing about being able to just do things rather than fail/forget them is that when it comes time to sleep, you don't feel like you wasted the day entirely. We're all very familiar with that nagging feeling of "What have I forgotten to do now?" My shrink described my speech problems as a sort of 'constricted grief', which is something anyone who's had them will understand implicitly. Being able to express yourself is good for the soul.

Sleep-wise, my doctors told me both reactions are possible, depending on the person. This is consistent with what I've read on the web and in books. I haven't tried going to bed on meds yet, but during the day Ritalin makes it both easier for me to fall asleep or stay awake if I choose to. My mind doesn't fight my decisions. If the cause of your insomnia is restless thoughts like me (common symptom), they might help. One reason I haven't tried it overnight is, well, 4 hours of lost sleep is a big commitment if you turn out to be the other type of ADHD. :D

*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition

jopie90
05-23-15, 12:53 AM
Hey,

Sorry the delay, I had a busy couple of days. But anyways, I have an appointment setup for Tuesday for ADHD Testing and Social Anxiety issues.

Thanks for all the information KnuteKlutz, it really eased my mind.

I think I will take your advice on seeing both a psychiatrist and psychologist, at least initially to see how things improve.

Also, I have never heard of the DSM-V before, thanks for the material!

And yes, most of my sleeping issues are caused by not being able to shut my head off at night.

KnuteKlutz
05-23-15, 02:07 PM
Glad to hear that. Do let us know how your progress goes.!