View Full Version : Being discriminated against


SmashPotato
06-09-15, 05:02 PM
This year I have applied to do Highers at a local college. These are the equivalent of A levels in England, and I don't know what the equivalent would be in the US but it is the last level you sit at high school and you can directly go onto University with good higher grades.I left high school in the middle of my final year so I never finished any highers due to ADD associated problems.

Due to cutbacks to college funding the maximum they allow students to sit is 3 highers. However, you need a minimum of 4 in 1 year in order to do most degrees at a good University. I am being refused to sit addition highers as night classes, which I would have to pay for myself, because of the "heavy workload" and because my past grades do not demonstrate what would normally be required to undertake such a workload, even though I have all A's in the required subjects I wish to take in the previous level. It is because some of these were achieved at 2 different points in time - before and after diagnosis and treatment.

Please, could anyone give me advice on what I can do to fight this? The people in charge of this decision at the college all seem to be holding a personal vendetta against me for no good reason. It seems like they enjoy the authority of being able to say no. They are all misinterpreting what I've said in phone calls and are passing lies about saying that I have been harassing them by repeatedly calling them. I only called a maybe 4 or 5 times because I wasn't getting any reply over email. They are not interested in my side of the story, they only believe what their other colleagues are saying, and one admin staff member in particular is completely rude and incompetent seems to be doing the most damage.

It seems unfair that one person has so much power to just say no to something that will affect my future. I have all the required grades. Okay, I had to resit English because I got a C before I was on medication, but all other subjects I got A in high school and the ones I did after high school I got all A's with the help of my medication.

I am planning to contact the local council education department and also a charity perhaps that deals with ADD. Is there anything else I could do?

SmashPotato
06-09-15, 05:10 PM
One thing I tried was speaking to the head of Biology at the college who was my lecturer while I was studying there. I thought maybe they could put the good word in and get me on the evening highers. All I said to them was that i was refused to do more than 3. They were very surprised at this and said "you should be able to sit evening highers along side day time highers because it's you who's paying for them". They said they would speak to the person in charge of the decision. Later that day I recieved this email from the dragon lady as I like to call her.

I understand from one of my colleagues that you have been in touch this morning to discuss your programme for next year and in particular our refusal to allow you to sit 5 Highers.



It is disingenuous of you to claim you do not know the reasons behind this decision as my colleague explained to you in detail only this morning the reasons why you are not being accepted for the additional subjects.



This decision has been reached after considerable discussion between myself and my colleagues and I consider it inappropriate for you to now pursue this with members of my staff.

I never said anything about not understanding the reasons why i wasn't accepted. See how they are twisting everything?

Little Missy
06-09-15, 06:34 PM
Just reading that shot my blood pressure to the moon.

TygerSan
06-09-15, 09:18 PM
Do you have to sit them through the college? I'd investigate any and all alternatives. Also look into any formal appeals process, going above and beyond the College level itself (if that makes sense? I don't quite know how the exam process works, but I'm assuming they're national exams). It sounds like you've run into someone whose tiny bit of power has rendered them completely devoid of flexibility, compassion and reason.

SmashPotato
06-10-15, 12:29 AM
Do you have to sit them through the college? I'd investigate any and all alternatives. Also look into any formal appeals process, going above and beyond the College level itself (if that makes sense? I don't quite know how the exam process works, but I'm assuming they're national exams). It sounds like you've run into someone whose tiny bit of power has rendered them completely devoid of flexibility, compassion and reason.

I did look into this last year and couldn't find much info, but I will research this a bit more because that would be ideal. To be honest I am actually more effective at studying alone anyway than going to class. I read a little of how this needs to be organized through a college to actually sit the final exam so this might bring about the same problem of being refused because it will be too demanding. All the colleges where I stay that offer highers are part of the same group which would probably mean the same people decide if I could do it or not. I think they would say no just for the sake of it because of how irritated they are at me for questioning their judgment.

acdc01
06-10-15, 02:09 AM
I'd try all other avenues first but if all else fails, get a lawyer.

People usually start getting scared when a lawyer confronts them.

SmashPotato
06-10-15, 05:05 AM
I'd try all other avenues first but if all else fails, get a lawyer.

People usually start getting scared when a lawyer confronts them.

Yeah it might come to that. Although, I'm not sure if I actually have any legal standing. I think it's within their right to refuse entry to anyone for whatever reason they see fit, which is a bit unfair. Plus, I doubt I could afford the legal fees.

Fuzzy12
06-10-15, 08:07 AM
I didn't go to school here so I'm not sure how the system works but could you possibly contact a university to ask them what exactly the entry requirements are and how you could attain them in your current situation?

SmashPotato
06-10-15, 10:35 AM
I didn't go to school here so I'm not sure how the system works but could you possibly contact a university to ask them what exactly the entry requirements are and how you could attain them in your current situation?

Yeah, I have done that. Well, on the website for your average science degree the requirements are 4 highers done is S5 (high school year 5) all A's. I emailed to ask how someone would be able to enter through doing highers at college and they said if you do 4 highers all in one year at college then that would be the equivalent.

The problem is, the colleges that offer highers have had their funding cut in the past 2 years and now only offer 3 highers MAX and to do more you need to take night classes which the student pays £230 each for. That is the only way. So, I said this when I spoke to the college on the phone. I explained that I need at least 4 highers to get into the University I want. They said "well, there are other Universities you can go to". The other universities aren't as good, which is why the entry requirements aren't as high. A degree from one of those Universities isn't the same thing and I don't want to have to compromise because I have ADD.

rickymooston
06-10-15, 09:26 PM
A degree from one of those Universities isn't the same thing and I don't want to have to compromise because I have ADD.

Actually, it makes less difference than you think but your university probably has a disability coordinator of some sort, start there. Find a disabled students association.

I went to a unfamous university. Still worked for famous companies

Not from your country but the UK is supposed to be more progressive on these things

namazu
06-11-15, 12:05 AM
I explained that I need at least 4 highers to get into the University I want. They said "well, there are other Universities you can go to". The other universities aren't as good, which is why the entry requirements aren't as high. A degree from one of those Universities isn't the same thing and I don't want to have to compromise because I have ADD.

I agree that you shouldn't be limited to attending less-rigorous programs because of your ADHD, assuming you have the aptitude for a more rigorous program, which it sounds like you do.

In the U.S., there is sometimes a possibility of beginning studies at one college or uni and then (typically after 1-2 years) transferring to another uni to complete a degree course.

For students with disabilities who have histories similar to yours (poor performance initially, but better performance after diagnosis and appropriate supports OR poor standardized test scores, but excellent performance in a chosen field), this is often a way to "get a foot in the door". After demonstrating that you can succeed in a challenging higher-education environment (even if perhaps not as challenging as the place you want to study), unis that wouldn't have given you a look before may be more willing to do so.

I don't know whether UK unis have transfer programs, nor how such programs might work, but if they exist, do consider that track if you can't get 4 exams lined up at once.

SmashPotato
06-12-15, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the replies. A lot of good ideas here.

I have submitted a formal letter of complaint to the college so I'm hoping that will change things.

SmashPotato
06-22-15, 10:50 AM
Update: After submitting a complaint to the college, they are still not allowing me to do the subjects I want. Each time I speak to them they give me a different reason why I can't.

Now they are saying I can't because I withdrew from the course in the past. This is true, I started the course in 2011 and I left on the first day because I had a bad reaction to ritalin which is what I was on at the time. I had a severe anxiety attack and had to stop the medication and couldn't continue my studies because I knew how long it would take for me even just to try a different medication.

It took about 6 months to go onto concerta after that because my Dr was off sick and then a couple of months after that I went private to get dex, which worked well. I now get dex through the national health care system, so I'm glad that's all sorted.

I am running out of options now and I think I will have to go down the legal route. My complaint has been escalated to stage 2 since I'm not happy with the outcome but I doubt that will change anything.

AshT
06-22-15, 11:07 PM
I'd try all other avenues first but if all else fails, get a lawyer.

People usually start getting scared when a lawyer confronts them.

Unfortunately it doesn't work like that in the UK. Taking on the LEA is like trying to sue primeminister. He's the one in power, he can change the laws to suit him. If the LEA and college are under funding cuts, it creates more problems and battering ram doesn't work here. Took one of my family members 6 years of battling them to get their child into a school, even though there's a law which states every child has a right to an education. They will pull out illegal stops. They can be a law under themselves. Unfortunately, I've come across a lot of cases, fortunately this one shouldn't be anywhere near as hard to win, op :).

Added to this, it seems like op is being denied NOT because of Adhd, it's because of grades. They're being incredibly black and white and unforgiving.

Op. I seriously recommend you contact addiss, the National Adhd charity. They are well aware of these types of problems and how to content with the LEA. They will be able to direct you. You may have a fight on your hand, but don't give up. You'll win.

If you need additional contacts in Scotland let me know, but give addiss a try first.

SmashPotato
06-23-15, 05:23 AM
I didn't realise there was a charity for ADHD in the UK that involves adults as well. I'll try phoning them. Thanks.

Skyf@ll
06-23-15, 08:06 AM
You can get into University in Scotland with an HNC. Use this site below for funding info

http://www.personallicencescotland.com/can-i-get-funding-for-my-personal-licence/

You will have to do it part-time though and it will be 2 years instead of 1.

£500 account for the first year and then apply for another £500 in the second year.

If you are over 16 and not earning over £22,000 you will 99.9999999 percent get it.

HNC's are more course-specific and as the classes are at night you could get a full-time job or part-time if it's too much.

N.B Ignore the whole license for alcohol thing.....just look at the bit for HNC qualification. Probably not the best site to explain it.....haha

SmashPotato
06-23-15, 08:44 AM
You can get into University in Scotland with an HNC. Use this site below for funding info

http://www.personallicencescotland.com/can-i-get-funding-for-my-personal-licence/

You will have to do it part-time though and it will be 2 years instead of 1.

£500 account for the first year and then apply for another £500 in the second year.

If you are over 16 and not earning over £22,000 you will 99.9999999 percent get it.

HNC's are more course-specific and as the classes are at night you could get a full-time job or part-time if it's too much.

N.B Ignore the whole license for alcohol thing.....just look at the bit for HNC qualification. Probably not the best site to explain it.....haha

Yeah I am not keen on doing a HNC because Glasgow University don't accept them. It would also mean I need to spend an extra year before getting into University because HNC requires either highers or an NC(1 year course) to study them but you don't really need good highers, just like C or above. It seems to me like the easy option if you can't handle highers.

Skyf@ll
06-23-15, 09:06 AM
Woah seems like some sort of Uni snobbery is in your mindset.

I can tell you I have had friends who went to Cali Uni and ones who went to Glasgow Uni.

Majority of the Cali ones earn a lot more money.

At the end of the day it's the interview that gets you the job.....not where you studied the qualification!

For the record Glasgow University isn't even in the top 20 in the UK.....so I would seriously change your outlook on things.

N.B Judging by your attitude towards things I'm sure there is a few things you have left out of your story. In my experience Colleges are a breeze to deal with.

SmashPotato
06-23-15, 09:31 AM
Maybe you are right. It is kind of an assumption I made because I've heard stories about companies only hiring from select Universities. It's just in my nature that I want go to the best Uni possible and get the most challenging qualifications, with the highest entry requirements.

Maybe I am wrong and maybe Cali is just as good as Glasgow or Strathclyde but my gut tells me that the quality of education is better at Glasgow/Strathclyde and a degree from these Uni's holds more weight.

I believe it's the same reason parents pay thousands to send their kids to private schools - Better quality education and just going to certain private schools opens some doors that going to a state school would not. I didn't go to a private school btw but I wish I did. I know someone who got into Glasgow Uni with highers at C purely because they went to a well known private school.

Although, this is just my perception of it anyway, purely based on anecdotal evidence, so I really don't know how it works in reality.

Skyf@ll
06-23-15, 09:39 AM
There is not much difference between Cali, Glasgow and Strathclyde, so why complicate things?

If you mentioned Cambridge or Oxford......well that's a different story!

SmashPotato
06-23-15, 10:02 AM
I just want to have as many options as possible. If I study 4 or 5 highers in the one year and get all A's then I can go to any University in Glasgow or Scotland that I want. If I go the HNC route then I need to add on an extra year and my options for where I can study are limited.

Skyf@ll
06-23-15, 10:57 AM
Fair enough, looks like you have made up your mind.

I wish you all the best!

AshT
06-23-15, 11:40 AM
Woah seems like some sort of Uni snobbery is in your mindset.

I can tell you I have had friends who went to Cali Uni and ones who went to Glasgow Uni.

Majority of the Cali ones earn a lot more money.

At the end of the day it's the interview that gets you the job.....not where you studied the qualification!

For the record Glasgow University isn't even in the top 20 in the UK.....so I would seriously change your outlook on things.

N.B Judging by your attitude towards things I'm sure there is a few things you have left out of your story. In my experience Colleges are a breeze to deal with.

Glasgow have a fairly good reputation. We're doing work with Edinburgh and Glasgow at the moment. Straythcycle had reputation in their business school. It really depends on what someone is doing. But in my limited experience of employment, the institution name can matter more than the degree grade. It might depend n the degree though.

Skyf@ll
06-24-15, 02:38 PM
Glasgow have a fairly good reputation. We're doing work with Edinburgh and Glasgow at the moment. Straythcycle had reputation in their business school. It really depends on what someone is doing. But in my limited experience of employment, the institution name can matter more than the degree grade. It might depend n the degree though.

It may contribute somewhat to gaining employment, I'm not denying that.

But remember, there is a lot more factors involved.

If you can give an excellent interview and make the employers "like" you.....(Interview 90%, University Degree 10%) forget where you studied it makes absolutely no difference.

Let's not give the OP the impression that he is going to walk into a job based on where he gained his degree.

If you’re going down a biased route, what’s stopping them saying....”Hey you got your Highers at College instead of High School".

Unless the Illuminati are involved, it’s mainly down to how you present yourself on the day of the interview.:eyebrow:

AshT
06-25-15, 12:43 PM
It may contribute somewhat to gaining employment, I'm not denying that.

But remember, there is a lot more factors involved.

If you can give an excellent interview and make the employers "like" you.....(Interview 90%, University Degree 10%) forget where you studied it makes absolutely no difference.

Let's not give the OP the impression that he is going to walk into a job based on where he gained his degree.

If you’re going down a biased route, what’s stopping them saying....”Hey you got your Highers at College instead of High School".

Unless the Illuminati are involved, it’s mainly down to how you present yourself on the day of the interview.:eyebrow:

Let's not give the OP the impression that he is going to walk into a job based on where he gained his degree.

True :). One may not get to the interview stage without a half-decent institution though, but it really depends on the company and the degree. The big tech companies do seem to put more weight on them. But, they have thousands of applicants to sift through and are looking for reasons to get rid of people.

I'm speaking mostly for graduates though, you may be coming from a longer-term perspective. Come graduation highers/A levels don't seem to matter much and once someone has 5 years of experience, degrees don't seem to matter much either. I wish I was warned about this!

Anyway if the OP is capable of at least trying to get into a University they really want, why not shoot for it? Would suck to get less because of some idiot behind a desk following black and white rules.

Hello! We have ADHD, we don't follow your rules, we break them.

So, go go go go OP and break through their BS system! :lol:

Skyf@ll
06-25-15, 01:39 PM
True :). One may not get to the interview stage without a half-decent institution though, but it really depends on the company and the degree. The big tech companies do seem to put more weight on them. But, they have thousands of applicants to sift through and are looking for reasons to get rid of people.

I'm speaking mostly for graduates though, you may be coming from a longer-term perspective. Come graduation highers/A levels don't seem to matter much and once someone has 5 years of experience, degrees don't seem to matter much either. I wish I was warned about this!

Anyway if the OP is capable of at least trying to get into a University they really want, why not shoot for it? Would suck to get less because of some idiot behind a desk following black and white rules.



Hello! We have ADHD, we don't follow your rules, we break them.

So, go go go go OP and break through their BS system! :lol:


I realised he had made up his mind and then wished him luck.

It's his choice at the end of the day.

I was suggesting an easier alternative because he seems to be in a bit of sheeeeet.

I was going by my friends experiences. I know someone who went to Glasgow and got a third class degree.....who is now working a low paid office job. What a waste, he is super bright....partied too much though. Unfortunately a third class degree is what it is, regardless of where it came from....he is living proof.

Me personally I would take the easy route haha

Go to "that" uni ;) that has a lesser reputation and then smash it in the interview.

But go go go OP F the system lol

kilted_scotsman
06-25-15, 02:01 PM
It's worth remembering that the colleges & Universities get their funding depending on how many people complete each year of the course not on the numbers that enroll at the beginning. This means the admin officers have to take a gamble on who they feel will complete.... if their drop out rate is too high they lose income.

There's an interesting statistic in one of Malcolm Gladwell's books about universities. OK so the stats are from the USA, but they indicated that if you went to a middling university you were proportionately MORE likely to go higher in your profession than if you went to an elite one.

There were many factors involved however it was plain that elite universities tend to hot house a few VERY intelligent students and many other's who would normally succeed struggle in this academically rarified atmosphere.

Personally I wouldn't fix my sights on one particular University, however the difference in funding between Scotland and England may mean you are limited to Scottish Universities.

Personal motivation and enthusiasm for the subject are more likely to enthuse recruiters rather than the name on the degree certificate. Likewise the peer group you mix with are crucial to how you do at University or college. Part of Gladwell's theory is that people at middling universities mix with a wider range of peer ability and can therefore find a group that suits their learning and life style, making for a stronger co-creation of learning.

From what you say I wou'dn't think this is a straight discrimination issue. THere seems to be more going on and I suspect the admissions staff are concerned because you dropped out previously. and are effectively making your third attempt to do highers.

SmashPotato
06-25-15, 03:47 PM
It's worth remembering that the colleges & Universities get their funding depending on how many people complete each year of the course not on the numbers that enroll at the beginning. This means the admin officers have to take a gamble on who they feel will complete.... if their drop out rate is too high they lose income.

There's an interesting statistic in one of Malcolm Gladwell's books about universities. OK so the stats are from the USA, but they indicated that if you went to a middling university you were proportionately MORE likely to go higher in your profession than if you went to an elite one.

There were many factors involved however it was plain that elite universities tend to hot house a few VERY intelligent students and many other's who would normally succeed struggle in this academically rarified atmosphere.

Personally I wouldn't fix my sights on one particular University, however the difference in funding between Scotland and England may mean you are limited to Scottish Universities.

Personal motivation and enthusiasm for the subject are more likely to enthuse recruiters rather than the name on the degree certificate. Likewise the peer group you mix with are crucial to how you do at University or college. Part of Gladwell's theory is that people at middling universities mix with a wider range of peer ability and can therefore find a group that suits their learning and life style, making for a stronger co-creation of learning.

From what you say I wou'dn't think this is a straight discrimination issue. THere seems to be more going on and I suspect the admissions staff are concerned because you dropped out previously. and are effectively making your third attempt to do highers.

Yeah, it's just frustrating because I know my lecturers, from when I studied there during 2013-2014, would 100% vouch for me. Not to sound arrogant but in every single unit test and mock exam for all subjects I scored above 85% and got 3 A's in the final exam.

It was a huge difference to high school where I felt dumber in a sense than most people because I didn't have meds, and now I feel I can breeze through these highers because I am 100% committed. I am even studying now in preparation even though college doesn't start for another 2 months.

However, they can't be bothered talking to my previous lecturers, or interviewing me, or asking about my adhd diagnosis. It's all very impersonal, they look at a piece of paper and decide I am not good enough to even do 1 extra higher (which is necessary to study what I am interested in at most universities in Scotland). They could even look at my test scores through out the year and if I'm not getting good grades they could stop me from sitting the final exam.

I got a letter through the post today stating that they had a meeting regarding my stage 2 complaint but the decision still stands. They suggested that I redo the subjects at the level below higher, which I have already got A's in from high school and then take 5 highers next year. This is not possible because the college only gives out funding for 2 years of study. If I were to do that i would need to get a part time job next year along side studying 5 highers, which is a bit much.

Ultimately it comes down to this gap between where I left high school and the present. This is due to the time it took for me to even realise I had ADHD in the first place, getting diagnosed and trying out different medications until I found one that worked.

In the UK it's a veeeery slow process. For me, it was a case of going to the GP, 2-4 months later seeing a specialist who knows nothing about adhd, "specialist" asks me all kinds of weird questions spanning over several appointments with 2 month gaps inbetween, finally try strattera and it doesnt work, wait 2 months and try ritalin which doesnt work, specialist is off sick for like 6 months and I am told I need to wait, try concerta which doesnt work, wait 2 months, try dexedrine. Then I needed to spend some time to get my life back on track by building a routine, learning to cook healthy food, exercise, etc.

I tried explaining all this to the people at the college but they don't want to listen.

kilted_scotsman
06-25-15, 04:08 PM
It is very impersonal..... and there are reasons for this.

Admissions officers HAVE to look at the paper in front of them and ONLY the paper in front of them. It is explicit in the admissions process that only what is asked for in the admissions form is allowable as part of the process.

This helps avoid the situation where applicants with good familial contacts and relationships with particular teachers/lecturers gain advantage over those who are unknown to staff or do not have good contacts/relationships with influential people.

If you want to complain about the process it's important to know what the process is and why it is the way it is.

SmashPotato
06-25-15, 04:49 PM
Well, I guess it is a good way to avoid nepotism but I also think there should be exceptional circumstances for people with disabilities, after all, college is about giving people a second chance who, for whatever reason, didn't achieve their full potential while at school, or at least that's what I thought college was for.

AshT
06-26-15, 07:33 AM
Well, I guess it is a good way to avoid nepotism but I also think there should be exceptional circumstances for people with disabilities, after all, college is about giving people a second chance who, for whatever reason, didn't achieve their full potential while at school, or at least that's what I thought college was for.

Managed to contact an organisation and get assistance? Checkout the scottish ADHD group on facebook too.

SmashPotato
06-26-15, 10:06 AM
Managed to contact an organisation and get assistance? Checkout the scottish ADHD group on facebook too.

Yeah, I contacted ADDISS and they asked me to phone back on Monday when the boss is in. It was only an admin worker I spoke to but they seemed quite sympathetic towards my case.

AshT
07-09-15, 12:20 PM
Yeah, I contacted ADDISS and they asked me to phone back on Monday when the boss is in. It was only an admin worker I spoke to but they seemed quite sympathetic towards my case.
Nice =).
Btw their conferences and events are completely amazing. Like the atmosphere is really, really, re-energising. And it's always an emotional rollarcoaster, with big highs and lows. Just like an ADHD event should be :D

SmashPotato
07-09-15, 02:48 PM
They gave me some good advice. They said I should contact the local council and state my case to them.

I've decided, however, not to take this any further. I've found a way to take 4 highers, but it involves traveling to a another town once a week to do a maths evening class at a different college. My plan was originally to do 5, but 4 is enough for what I want to do.

snjyds
04-29-17, 01:58 AM
Please, could anyone give me advice on what I can do to fight this? The people in charge of this decision at the college all seem to be holding a personal vendetta against me for no good reason. It seems like they enjoy the authority of being able to say no. They are all misinterpreting what I've said in phone calls and are passing lies about saying that I have been harassing them by repeatedly calling them.
Dear SmashPotato,
My experience has been far worse than yours. I will post my experience sometime soon. It is horrible. I may consider a lawsuit and maybe the first person to win ever.

Postulate
04-30-17, 09:00 PM
This year I have applied to do Highers at a local college. These are the equivalent of A levels in England, and I don't know what the equivalent would be in the US but it is the last level you sit at high school and you can directly go onto University with good higher grades.I left high school in the middle of my final year so I never finished any highers due to ADD associated problems.

Due to cutbacks to college funding the maximum they allow students to sit is 3 highers. However, you need a minimum of 4 in 1 year in order to do most degrees at a good University. I am being refused to sit addition highers as night classes, which I would have to pay for myself, because of the "heavy workload" and because my past grades do not demonstrate what would normally be required to undertake such a workload, even though I have all A's in the required subjects I wish to take in the previous level. It is because some of these were achieved at 2 different points in time - before and after diagnosis and treatment.

Please, could anyone give me advice on what I can do to fight this? The people in charge of this decision at the college all seem to be holding a personal vendetta against me for no good reason. It seems like they enjoy the authority of being able to say no. They are all misinterpreting what I've said in phone calls and are passing lies about saying that I have been harassing them by repeatedly calling them. I only called a maybe 4 or 5 times because I wasn't getting any reply over email. They are not interested in my side of the story, they only believe what their other colleagues are saying, and one admin staff member in particular is completely rude and incompetent seems to be doing the most damage.

It seems unfair that one person has so much power to just say no to something that will affect my future. I have all the required grades. Okay, I had to resit English because I got a C before I was on medication, but all other subjects I got A in high school and the ones I did after high school I got all A's with the help of my medication.

I am planning to contact the local council education department and also a charity perhaps that deals with ADD. Is there anything else I could do?

You need a letter from your psychiatrist, I used to comically call it the "letter of pardon" when I was in university because the doctor is basically saying they cannot put any weight on your grades prior to treatment without being discriminatory towards you. It is a document with legal value in court.