View Full Version : I quit Dexedrine after 20 years, Might Restart


karmicdream
06-11-15, 07:09 PM
Hi Everyone,

I've been on a relatively low dose of dexedrine for 20 years (started age 10, I'm now 29) I started with 15 mg (10 ER, 5 IR both in the morning) and eventually eliminated the 5mg IR.

I never took a drug holiday, and took them regularly pretty much every day for 20 years without increasing my dosage or abusing them.

I own my own successful photography business. I actually live in Thailand 4 months out of the year traveling the globe and shooting photos, the rest of the year i'm in in New York city.

I am my own boss and schedule is super flexible, I basically work when I want and do whatever I want day to day when I don't have gigs booked. It's honestly a dream come true, and I know many people dream about the same... but even so, there are struggles.

This was my fourth year in a row spending 4 months away traveling, and after much thought I decided to go without my 10 mg of dexedrine for the first time in my life.

It went much better than expected at first, and I felt so proud like I could live my life without this medication. The first few weeks were hard but I was excited to be traveling. I did notice I was much more susceptible to moodiness /emotional ups and downs, but this also comes with traveling the way I do.

I've been back in New York for 3 weeks trying to get back to my routine and now I'm having a really hard time. At first I was just giving myself time to readjust, but I can no longer say that it's that.

I have an impossible time trying to get started in the morning and I have the urge to just constantly watch shows and movies and do absolutely nothing. I've been trying to force myself to go running and workout and that's been really hard, but i do it at least 3 x a week.

I just don't feel like myself. For a while I was still ordering 5mgs but hadn't taken them, so I have a supply and I was thinking of just taking a 5 or 2.5 mg in the morning and seeing how that goes, but I really wanted to stay off :(

I keep wondering how much of it is just in my mind overthinking it/ especially since i have a lot of free time and a lot of alone time because I work from home, I'm single with room mates.

Has anyone gone off and then restarted a similar amount of dexedrine? Does anyone else work from home and struggle to manage it?

Of course like many people, I liked the idea of not having to be dependent on a med, but at what cost? I'm so much less productive, less optimistic, and feel so lazy, tired, and heavy (yes, feel like i'm gaining weight too).

The other issue is I've always had a great situation with getting my meds. My father is a physician and I had health insurance through his workplace until recently. Of course he's not my doctor but he knew my doctor. It was really easy for me to get 3 months of meds for my long term travel. Now my dad is retiring and I have to find a doctor in New York and get new insurance out of pocket because I own my business (until next open enrollment period, i don't have health insurance but i accidentally thought i was auto paying it when I was traveling, but I wasn't and they booted me).

I just thought, life would be less complicated if I could just nix the little 10mg dosage, it seemed like so little compared to what most people take, but sitting here on my couch, after another day of feeling no motivation to work or be social or do anything... I guess it's not so easy.

Anyone have similar experience trying to go off?

willow129
06-11-15, 07:14 PM
Well, I don't have experience going off meds, but the problems you described are pretty much me in a nutshell when I'm unmedicated. It's like, that's ADHD for ya, I can't find a complete solution for it myself, except to lower my expectations of myself a bit.

karmicdream
06-11-15, 07:18 PM
Sigh, that's what I'm afraid of...

willow129
06-11-15, 07:27 PM
Ooh I'm sorry :( I think there are lots of people here who could give you some tips that might work for you. Everyone's different. There are organizational strategies/tricks. Set small manageable goals for yourself in what you want to achieve. Getting enough sleep is huge. Exercise does help as well, but I agree it can be hard to get motivated.

Pilgrim
06-12-15, 05:45 AM
What I find interesting is that you have taken it for so long, because I could take it for that long.
Managing it from home can be a struggle; I think if you feel better on it than off why not take it.
You have shown remarkable discipline to take extended breaks and stay at such a low dose.

chivalrouspal
06-13-15, 01:45 PM
Dude be rational... you have been already though this for 20 yrs... just get over it the drug does nothing... except giving you a life with 50%+ less symptoms... its a blessing.
The medication can`t do the same for normal people and will probably make them worse so yes its an advantage for you when compared to others!! but those others are fellow adhd who aren`t getting diagnosis/medication!
you did a great job stopping all this time (many weeks) after your body built a super dependency on it

IMO as my psychiatrist said..... always stop the medication when you are just "chilling" you can do that many days a month i won't say drop the dose though cause i noticed lower doses doesn't feel right with me...

just imagine all those screams of joy of thousands newly diagnosed at older ages.... see how god blessed you by a very early diagnosis and "my own boss" kind of career and professional life!
be happy i'm outspoken about dexamphetamine that i tell people around me with no "shyness" of the typical stupid human judgment....
and regarding the insurance... i would say... try out generics start with whatever cheapest and give it a try for a month..... Good luck mate!

sarahsweets
06-16-15, 04:47 AM
Try not to beat yourself up for needing meds, possibly for life. I have been on stimulants for over 10 years now and never needed to increase my dose once I reached the target amount. When I have had a lapse in meds because I am really bad about planning to get the refill on time, my symptoms are horrible and I dont for one second feel bad about needing them. I am a hazard driving unmedicated and the severity of my adhd really f**ks up my life and is just barely controlled enough to function when medicated. If you needed glasses to read would you not wear them because you thought you could power through it on your own?

Hyperman87
06-28-15, 09:53 PM
I been on Vyvanse practically everyday for 4 years. I don't think I could get much done at all,if i wasn't on it(I'm being serious):lol::o

I've just accepted ADHD & it's treatment as a fact of life!

ADDofftheWall
06-29-15, 09:46 AM
From what I know, Dexedrine has been superseded by the more traditional stimulant medications such as Ritalin, Adderall, and Vyvanse. I asked my doctor about potentially switching to Dexedrine but he told me that it's rarely prescribed and that he has never written a prescription for it in all his years of practicing medicine. He also told me that there is a stigma attached to it because people used to abuse the drug upon it's inception during the late 70s/early 80s. Apparently, it was released in order to replace an amphetamine based drug called "Biphetamine" (e.g. Black Beauties) and while it was very effective at controlling the symptoms of ADHD, people started to use it as a "party drug" and a weight loss supplement. So Adderall was created to phase out Dexedrine and after Shire lost it's patent, it created Vyvanse, which is watered down Dexedrine.

So I am not sure if you will be able to obtain a prescription for Dexedrine as easily as before. Your GP/psychiatrist might encourage you to try Vyvanse or Adderall and maybe even lead you towards the nonstimulant medications such as Straterra and Wellbutrin (which are both awful in my opinion).

dag nab it
06-29-15, 11:00 PM
After you find a doctor - If you need to pay out of pocket, the cheapest ADHD medication would be short-acting generic Adderall (amphetamine mixed salts) or dextroamphetamine (Destrostat). To get a general idea of the current pricing, look at GoodRx.

Wellbutrin is generally prescribed for depression, although it can help with ADHD symptoms and motivation. Since it's not a controlled substance, it should be easier to get a script for it. Also, the generic (SR form) is cheaper than Adderall or dextroamphetamine. I found it very useful short term (when combined with dextroamphetamine) - but it stopped working within a few months, despite an increase in dosage, and it had side effects.

sarahsweets
07-10-15, 02:36 AM
I am not sure this is the case as there are many people that are prescribed dexedrine including in the UK.


From what I know, Dexedrine has been superseded by the more traditional stimulant medications such as Ritalin, Adderall, and Vyvanse. I asked my doctor about potentially switching to Dexedrine but he told me that it's rarely prescribed and that he has never written a prescription for it in all his years of practicing medicine. He also told me that there is a stigma attached to it because people used to abuse the drug upon it's inception during the late 70s/early 80s. Apparently, it was released in order to replace an amphetamine based drug called "Biphetamine" (e.g. Black Beauties) and while it was very effective at controlling the symptoms of ADHD, people started to use it as a "party drug" and a weight loss supplement. So Adderall was created to phase out Dexedrine and after Shire lost it's patent, it created Vyvanse, which is watered down Dexedrine.

So I am not sure if you will be able to obtain a prescription for Dexedrine as easily as before. Your GP/psychiatrist might encourage you to try Vyvanse or Adderall and maybe even lead you towards the nonstimulant medications such as Straterra and Wellbutrin (which are both awful in my opinion).