View Full Version : Your Brain and Persistent Depression


Unmanagable
07-10-15, 01:29 AM
I hope it's okay to share this link. I found this pretty fascinating:

Depression Damages Parts of the Brain (http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.iflscience.com%2Fhealth-and-medicine%2Fdepression-damages-parts-brain-research-concludes)

Brain damage is caused by persistent depression rather than being a predisposing factor for it, researchers have finally concluded after decades of unconfirmed hypothesising.

A study published in Molecular Psychology today has proved once and for all that recurrent depression shrinks the hippocampus - an area of the brain responsible for forming new memories - leading to a loss of emotional and behavioural function.

Hippocampal shrinkage has long been linked to depression but previous studies haven’t been conclusive. Small sample sizes, varying types of depression and treatment levels, as well as variance in methods for collecting and interpreting results, have together led to inconsistent and often conflicting findings.
This is the study they refer to, just in case the link above can't stay:

http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/mp201569a.html

Hathor
07-10-15, 02:41 AM
have you ever seen mentioned a snowball effect with depression and ADHD? Your post seems to indicate that it may work, and it seems in line with my experience losing motivation and memory worse and worse as the school years dragged on.

atypical depression and ADHD-PI in my case. Perhaps I call it the "Slowball" to synthesize a speedball into a snowball.

Unmanagable
07-10-15, 11:42 AM
I don't recall seeing it specifically mentioned, but that accurately describes how I feel when I go to my depressive ditches. A snowball effect. It's like walking through my days stuck in quicksand that just keeps getting deeper, and I can see it and feel it, but am pretty helpless against it in the moment.

And I never feel as if allowing it to happen is going to possibly make it better, and then it finally fades away, and once I'm out of it, I'm better able to see. But there for a while, it was taking weeks to fade, and then months. It got pretty scary, and I almost checked out a few times. Now I'm down for maybe a day, unless there's additional physical complications accompanying that limit my abilities even more, then it can escalate into a longer time frame.