View Full Version : Fluoride related to causation of ADHD in some cases?


Kunga Dorji
08-11-15, 07:45 PM
http://www.ehjournal.net/content/14/1/17/abstract

It is obvious that correlation does not necessarily equal causation, but fluoride is a known neurotoxin.

Exposure to fluoridated water and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States: an ecological association

Ashley J Malin* and Christine Till

Environmental Health 2015, 14:17 doi:10.1186/s12940-015-0003-1
Published: 27 February 2015

Abstract

Background

Epidemiological and animal-based studies have suggested that prenatal and postnatal fluoride exposure has adverse effects on neurodevelopment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between exposure to fluoridated water and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States.
Methods

Data on ADHD prevalence among 4-17 year olds collected in 2003, 2007 and 2011 as part of the National Survey of Children’s Health, and state water fluoridation prevalence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collected between 1992 and 2008 were utilized.
Results

State prevalence of artificial water fluoridation in 1992 significantly positively predicted state prevalence of ADHD in 2003, 2007 and 2011, even after controlling for socioeconomic status. A multivariate regression analysis showed that after socioeconomic status was controlled each 1% increase in artificial fluoridation prevalence in 1992 was associated with approximately 67,000 to 131,000 additional ADHD diagnoses from 2003 to 2011. Overall state water fluoridation prevalence (not distinguishing between fluoridation types) was also significantly positively correlated with state prevalence of ADHD for all but one year examined.
Conclusions

Parents reported higher rates of medically-diagnosed ADHD in their children in states in which a greater proportion of people receive fluoridated water from public water supplies. The relationship between fluoride exposure and ADHD warrants future study.

SB_UK
08-12-15, 04:44 AM
The review identified only three studies since 1975—of sufficient quality to be included—that addressed the effectiveness of fluoridation on tooth decay in the population at large. These papers determined that fluoridation does not reduce cavities to a statistically significant degree in permanent teeth, says study co-author Anne-Marie Glenny (http://www.dentistry.manchester.ac.uk/staff/Anne-MarieGlenny/), a health science researcher at Manchester University in the United Kingdom. The authors found only seven other studies worthy of inclusion dating prior to 1975.
http://www.newsweek.com/fluoridation-may-not-prevent-cavities-huge-study-shows-348251


It'd be interesting to know what human beings have done to change our environment which in the long term will be shown to have been worthwhile.

Eliminate our shoes, eliminate fluoride, eliminate pretty much all of the foods we eat ... ...


I'm left with ONLY retractable hemp underpants - which to be fair were prototyped by Adam and Eve and which haven't been mass produced by any corporation as yet.

sarahsweets
08-12-15, 05:00 AM
I've always been a little leary of the amount of fluoride in water.

Little Missy
08-12-15, 08:29 AM
I think that if you want to use fluoride then go buy it and apply it.

Unmanagable
08-12-15, 11:14 AM
Remember when dentists used to fairly regularly prescribe fluoride pills to kids? I have a few friends who experienced that.

One of them fears she's experiencing the early stages of Alzheimer's, or is about to have a total break down from the overwhelm of illness, etc., whichever comes first.

None of her doctors wish to discuss anything regarding the build up of potential causes that could include fluoride, toxins, or nutritional aspects, they just keep prescribing antibiotics for mystery illnesses they can't seem to decipher. Grrrrrrrrrrrr

KarmanMonkey
08-12-15, 11:26 AM
I'm kind of hesitant to buy into this research without knowing more about their methods. From the blurb you posted, it looked like they just took state fluoridation rates and compared it to ADHD rates.

The problem with this model is that it's not looking at other factors. Are fluoridation levels connected to other social factors? Is the fluoridation in response to some other environmental factors that could play a part in ADHD?

The only way that might provide good evidence is the creation of a study that tracks a large body of people in the same socioeconomic environment, half drinking fluoridated water, and half not. Even then I'd have my doubts.

I often find the media will run with a study before there is enough evidence to support the conclusions; that's why there is so much misinformation about vaccinations. A study connecting vaccinations to autism has long since been denounced as being a poorly designed and executed experiment, and that it had absolutely untrue conclusions, but it is still a widely held belief that there is a causal relationship.

It's kind of like saying cancer causes cell phones:

https://xkcd.com/925/

It's also like saying that eating pickles raises risk of ADHD because pretty much everyone with ADHD has eaten a pickle.

icarusinflames
08-12-15, 03:21 PM
I had at least 2 flouride treatments when I was very small. Interesting! I don't know if it was the dentist who was pushing it or mom was concerned about my teeth.

But then again, I have no signs of dental pitting, staining, irregularity of the color or any of the signs of Flourosis (when you are actually over exposed to flouride) so I don't think I do have that problem.

SB_UK
08-12-15, 03:57 PM
Can't we just eliminate sugar + starch from the human diet ? rather than start placing mercury and fluoride into our bodies.

It's well known that carbs are NOT required (unlike protein,fat) by us.

Kunga Dorji
08-13-15, 02:17 AM
I'm kind of hesitant to buy into this research without knowing more about their methods. From the blurb you posted, it looked like they just took state fluoridation rates and compared it to ADHD rates.

The problem with this model is that it's not looking at other factors. Are fluoridation levels connected to other social factors? Is the fluoridation in response to some other environmental factors that could play a part in ADHD?

The only way that might provide good evidence is the creation of a study that tracks a large body of people in the same socioeconomic environment, half drinking fluoridated water, and half not. Even then I'd have my doubts.

I often find the media will run with a study before there is enough evidence to support the conclusions; that's why there is so much misinformation about vaccinations. A study connecting vaccinations to autism has long since been denounced as being a poorly designed and executed experiment, and that it had absolutely untrue conclusions, but it is still a widely held belief that there is a causal relationship.

It's kind of like saying cancer causes cell phones:

https://xkcd.com/925/

It's also like saying that eating pickles raises risk of ADHD because pretty much everyone with ADHD has eaten a pickle.

The research quoted did consider and correct for socio-economic factors so that objection is clarified.
However there is really no doubt as to the neurotoxic effects of fluoride, and there has never been a safe level of intake established.

KarmanMonkey
08-13-15, 10:22 AM
The research quoted did consider and correct for socio-economic factors so that objection is clarified.
However there is really no doubt as to the neurotoxic effects of fluoride, and there has never been a safe level of intake established.

My main argument is that it will take time and extensive study to establish this type of relationship, and in the meantime, promoting their conclusion that ADHD is related to Fluoridation as fact would be premature.

I admit I don't know many of the health concerns associated with fluoridation, and I agree with SB_UK that it would be far healthier to make dietary changes that will undo the harm that lead people to fluoridate water in the first place.

Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search, and got this information from the Ontario Dental Association:

I've been hearing about health risks associated with water fluoridation. Is this true?

In 2010, after referring to over 400 published scientific studies, Health Canada released a 104 page document on “Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality- Guideline Document-Fluoride”. In this report, Health Canada explains that: “The weight of evidence from all currently available studies does not support a link between exposure to fluoride in drinking water at 1.5 mg/L and any adverse health effects, including those related to cancer, immunotoxicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity, genotoxicity and/or neurotoxicity. It also does not support a link between fluoride exposure and intelligence quotient deficit, as there are significant concerns regarding the relevant studies, including quality, credibility, and methodological weaknesses.”

It should be noted that Health Canada has determined that the optimal concentration of fluoride in drinking water for dental health be 0.7mg/L for communities that wish to fluoridate. Therefore, even when double this amount is used it is not linked to any adverse health effects.