View Full Version : Is pot addictive?


sarahsweets
08-21-15, 04:42 AM
I smoked pot twice in college and it never worked for me. It made me agitated and paranoid, never chill or relaxed. I am just curious about this because I have heard of a lot of people in recovery from substance abuse or alcohol say that pot doesnt count, and that its not addictive and that because its legal in some states that its ok. For me, recovery means no illegal drugs or alcohol, and specifically, nothing taken with the intent to be mood altering. I dont mean that if I had surgery I would never take pain meds, or never treat my adhd, recovery doesnt mean suffering. Its just that for me, smoking pot to get high is not a form of treatment. i am not judging anyone who does, to each their own, but I have met a few people that said they were not addicted and then when they tried to stop they felt horrible. My brother was like this, He is 26 and smoked pot off an on since high school and was one of those people who never gets addicted to anything yet when he had to stop to go to nursing school, he really suffered. Psychologically for him it was very addictive. Not sure if that translates physically. How do you feel about this? And do you think that if someone is in recovery they shouldnt smoke pot?

aeon
08-21-15, 05:32 AM
Pot was my drug of choice.

Now, for those who say pot is not addictive, I’ll just say they never saw me (ab)use it. At my worst, I chose it over and above everything else in my life. That’s the essence of addiction. And I had all the self-deceptions, rationalizations, lies, and manipulations of any addict.

And I can still remember the first time I tried it. I said to myself “Oh my god, I want to feel like this for the rest of my life.”

Addictive potential is only half in the substance/activity, etc. A huge part of it is the individual, and how that plays out across physical, emotional, cognitive, intuitive, and even spiritual (for whom that applies) aspects of experience.

My thoughts on recovery are exactly the same as yours in that anything taken with the intent to be mood-altering outside of that which is prescribed by a doctor is the end of sobriety.

When I quit, I was in a funk of sorts for 6 months before it lifted. And I’m talking the physical and mood effects of the drug itself, not the additional burden of having to be present with feelings I was desperate to avoid, feelings that I had not processed, feelings that I previously escaped through purposeful oblivion.

Some people can smoke it and not have it take over their lives. Some are helped by it. Some people can use it in moderation.

I am not one of those people. I know that if I were to use I would abuse, and everything I enjoy in my current life would be right down the toilet, and I wouldn’t care. It seems like it should be a simple thing, but I know that for me it is not, and never will be. I would destroy myself.

I am an addict in recovery, and I forget that at my own peril.

Pot not a serious drug? Maybe for some. I was pretty ******* serious about it. Pretty ******* serious indeed.


Cheers,
Ian

Pilgrim
08-21-15, 07:18 AM
Is pot addictive? Big time, it was my drug of choice when I didn't have a clue what ADD was.
One of the hardest things of my 'experience ' was my father realising that I was a pothead.
My father was a Policeman for 40 years.
I think Aeon explains it very well.
I realised yesterday I am psychologically dependant on my ADD med, I was the same with pot. I think it is how it slowed me down, calmed my racing mind a port in the storm;but it brings on depression. It's a depressant.
I never heard it but I will follow it from today ( anything that is mind altering not prescribed by the doctor and that's the end)
When I was younger it was like everyone I knew smoked pot, even older people who should have had their **** together, I looked at them and said that's not going to be me.

Unmanagable
08-21-15, 11:36 AM
Anything we rely on to take us out of ourselves as a form of escape, or even as a chance at trying to get through the damn day, has the potential to become very addictive, regardless of whether it is a substance or an activity.

Personally, I feel some folks could greatly benefit from it for various reasons, but not necessarily from smoking it. I have several friends who would likely be dead if it weren't for finally gaining legal access to it.

There again, as with anything that can be medicinal and helpful to some, it is NOT for everyone, and the risk for abuse always remains.

Pilgrim
08-21-15, 12:49 PM
Yeah as a pain relief medicine, they should get the best.

I'm not against it, it's just not for this duck.

Batman55
08-22-15, 01:51 AM
Sarah I'm not sure you mean "during recovery" or you mean "life after recovery." But as your statement stands I might argue your point that using "anything" for it's mood lifting effects is destructive.. witness, for example, the stereotype of ol' Al Anon' meetings with constant smoke breaks and pot after pot of coffee.. now, it's a stereotype.. but I mostly wouldn't judge that behavior even if it's real.

Harm reduction is what I believe in. Everyone has to get their rocks off somehow.. wouldn't judge it unless the behavior is causing serious problems for self and those around them.. a simple desire to temporarily improve mood, ability, well-being? IMHO nothing wrong with this unless/until one returns to the true problem substance.

phazonConduit
08-22-15, 02:28 AM
My basis for distinction of "recovery" lies on the difference between mood-lifting and mind-altering substances. Cigarettes and coffee are mood-lifting; these little suckers just give me a slight boost that fades instantly, but the feel of it lingers. They're a hit or miss, but I don't see myself wanting to do anything for either. I can live a day or thirty without both.

Pot did the latter for me; I wasn't in the real world anymore. And I did everything I could to get my hands on it.

I'm the same as aeon; I chose it over everything else: friends, school, communication--it took over every aspect of my social life and mental health. It was a retreat from everything because it made life much more bearable and emotions the last things I ever wanted to feel. I, too, am a recovering addict. Pot was just the beginning. I delved deeper into this disease and consider myself lucky for having stopped when I did. I was on the brink of destruction. I almost lost my mind. But, for the sake of staying on topic, the rest of my downward spiral wasn't pretty, because a substance can only do so much before you find something "better" -- something easier to cling onto because it hides everything, including judgment.


To me, emotions still feel ****** because of the amount of struggle it caused me to go off-kilter from being unable to identify it. Having something to mask it and change it to something else became a sanctuary. The only harm it did was mental.

I agree: there are people who need it. It proven to be an alternative pain-killer and its use is quite effective when dealing with chronic pain. There just comes a point where the medicinal aspect gives in and grows into a self-destructive dependency. And I am also a recovering addict. I know what substances would truly be the end of me, and which ones I can slowly take a notch down. It's a truly difficult path, but I know this is something of which I truly had to drop all my reservations.

sarahsweets
08-22-15, 05:25 AM
I think the difference is impairment too. Cigarettes and coffee can be mood lifting but not impairing in the same way pot can be. But pot can impair your ability to drive or make decisions whereas coffee and smokes do not. I am not talking about medical pot, to me thats different. Just like pain killers can be a abused, so can pot but that doesnt mean people shouldnt be prescribed it.

Sarah I'm not sure you mean "during recovery" or you mean "life after recovery." But as your statement stands I might argue your point that using "anything" for it's mood lifting effects is destructive.. witness, for example, the stereotype of ol' Al Anon' meetings with constant smoke breaks and pot after pot of coffee.. now, it's a stereotype.. but I mostly wouldn't judge that behavior even if it's real.

Harm reduction is what I believe in. Everyone has to get their rocks off somehow.. wouldn't judge it unless the behavior is causing serious problems for self and those around them.. a simple desire to temporarily improve mood, ability, well-being? IMHO nothing wrong with this unless/until one returns to the true problem substance.

Pilgrim
08-22-15, 07:39 AM
They call pot a soft drug and it's not. That's where it's psychological,I've seen people completely lose it.
We don't have the medicinal pot thing here,but it's coming, it will be strictly controlled though.

stef
08-22-15, 11:12 AM
im very for it for medicinal purposes and occasional use and i dont think anyone should be in jail for it but wow am i grateful i never was around it enough to get addicted!

Unmanagable
08-22-15, 11:28 AM
I think it's also worth noting the synthetically created crap they sell over the counter in convenience stores, etc. that they highlight in the news as being a major cause of psychosis and what not is totally different than what most folks I know use. Stuff like that is what many are left with trying to get because it's been deemed illegal otherwise.

Also notice the strains they are creating for the legal dispensaries, etc., too. When I say I'm in support of it, I'm referring to the old school method of partaking in what used to grow naturally from the ground and was not modified in any form, just picked and dried. I enjoy that particular substance in the same manner I enjoy my food. Untainted by the hands of man.

TelepathBoy
08-25-15, 02:40 AM
Pot "not counting" for people in "recovery" is a real pet peeve of mine. Meh. Maybe it isn't. Whatever. It's their lives to ruin. Pot certainly does count, doubly so if you are an addict.

I'm not at all an anti pot crusader. There do seem to be benefits to pot use for some people, and, certainly, if you're gonna do one drug all day everyday, do pot. No question. But if you're gonna do that, don't kid yourself or try to tell everyone you're not addicted. The mental backflips that potheads do to justify their addiction are really something to behold.

I've never been capable of that level of self-deception. I'm an alky 10 years removed from my last drink, so I know an addict when I see one. I've tried the pot thing in the past "for my migraines". Right. Before I knew it I was smoking all day every day. I certainly tried to buy into all this pro pot propaganda and convince myself it was "medicine" and had all these amazing benefits. Nope. I was just a pothead looking for an excuse to get high. And if pot had 1/10th the health benefits potheads claim we wouldn't have people dying of cancer or suffering from arthritis, etc. As soon as I figured it all out I flushed it down the toilet and didn't look back. I didn't really like the stuff much anyway.

I'll put it this way - is it physically addictive (ie, you will get severe, life-threatening withdrawals if you quit) like opiates, alcohol, or benzos? Nope. But, the severity of most peoples' addictions to those substances don't approach that level in the first place. I didn't get DTs when I stopped drinking. But I most certainly had a destructive drinking problem. Same with potheads. Just because you don't get physical withdrawals when you quit doesn't mean you're not a pothead. Physically addictive? No. Psychologically? You bet.

But, hey, if that works for you, go for it. Seriously.

sarahsweets
08-27-15, 04:39 AM
I'll put it this way - is it physically addictive (ie, you will get severe, life-threatening withdrawals if you quit) like opiates, alcohol, or benzos? Nope. But, the severity of most peoples' addictions to those substances don't approach that level in the first place. I didn't get DTs when I stopped drinking. But I most certainly had a destructive drinking problem. Same with potheads. Just because you don't get physical withdrawals when you quit doesn't mean you're not a pothead. Physically addictive? No. Psychologically? You bet.

I agree with you on this point! I am one of those people who had severe withdrawls from alcohol and probably should have had a medical detox. Being on lamictal for bipolar is what I believe saved me from having seizures. Psychological addiction imo is what can be the hardest to overcome. And like you said, there are medical uses for pot that I totally get, just like there are medical uses for pain pills- no one deserves to suffer. Only the person using the pot will know if they are kidding themselves or not. I have PTSD and I'm sure if I worked hard enough at it, I could learn to make pot work for me to help treat it, but I cant do that as an alcoholic.

Batman55
08-28-15, 12:27 AM
I just tried pot for the first time ever in the last 2 weeks... to keep this post un-controversial, I'll say I neither condone nor condemn it.. and also I do not recommend anyone use pot unless it is legal in their area, or medically allowed.

That said, I have to say I don't get what's supposed to be so good about this. I can't even fathom how this stuff could be addictive, re: the OP's question.

Now it might be the fact that I only tried edibles the 2 times I used--edibles are supposed to be very strong and are not recommended for newbies--but then consider that I tried a *tiny* amount both times and mostly what I ended up with was anxiety (not surprising, given that I'm dx'ed with that), the short-term memory of a goldfish, drowsiness and uncomfortable "dissociative" effects like I was a witness outside of myself, at times. The only good effects I noticed were a kind of sedative/numbing effect I imagine might be good for pain relief and as a sleep aid, also some occasional trippy effects like time distortion, enhanced sensory stimulation, etc, but nothing special.

And yet I'm aware some people use this every day and become addicted to it for non-medical reasons.. and why? Something that makes it so that you can't do anything, can't remember anything, can't hold a single train of thought, you feel "unreal" and it's scary, dysphoria.. what's so good about that? Just curious, anyway.

For anyone who likes weed or depends on it for medical reasons, consider I'm not condemning this plant or anyone who uses it, I'm just surprised this is so popular when I had such a poor experience with it.

aeon
08-28-15, 12:03 PM
That said, I have to say I don't get what's supposed to be so good about this. I can't even fathom how this stuff could be addictive, re: the OP's question.

Now it might be the fact that I only tried edibles the 2 times I used--edibles are supposed to be very strong and are not recommended for newbies--but then consider that I tried a *tiny* amount both times and mostly what I ended up with was anxiety (not surprising, given that I'm dx'ed with that), the short-term memory of a goldfish, drowsiness and uncomfortable "dissociative" effects like I was a witness outside of myself, at times. The only good effects I noticed were a kind of sedative/numbing effect I imagine might be good for pain relief and as a sleep aid, also some occasional trippy effects like time distortion, enhanced sensory stimulation, etc, but nothing special.

And yet I'm aware some people use this every day and become addicted to it for non-medical reasons.. and why? Something that makes it so that you can't do anything, can't remember anything, can't hold a single train of thought, you feel "unreal" and it's scary, dysphoria.. what's so good about that? Just curious, anyway.

For anyone who likes weed or depends on it for medical reasons, consider I'm not condemning this plant or anyone who uses it, I'm just surprised this is so popular when I had such a poor experience with it.

Keep in mind, thatís the effect of eaten cannabis on Batman55, not the effects of cannabis in general.

Back when I smoked it, my experience was very different than what you report...and that doesnít make you wrong, or me right...itís just to show that for cannabis, and really, most all psychoactive intoxicants, part is the drug, part is the person, part is the expectations, part is the environment, and so on.

Iíve witnessed someone become totally unglued from smoking just a bit of cannabis...not in a dangerous way, but by any standard clinical appraisal, they would have been described as psychotic.

There isnít any one way that cannabis affects people, even if there are some common elements.


cheers,
Ian

mildadhd
09-14-15, 08:40 PM
What is the difference between pot and medical pot?


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mildadhd
09-14-15, 08:49 PM
Is cannabis medication addictive?

Is ADHD medication addictive?



P

Greyhound1
09-14-15, 10:37 PM
What is the difference between pot and medical pot?


P

Quality control

Greyhound1
09-14-15, 10:38 PM
Is cannabis medication addictive?

Is ADHD medication addictive?



P

For some, absolutely

daveddd
09-14-15, 10:44 PM
What is the difference between pot and medical pot?


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the state you live in

daveddd
09-14-15, 10:58 PM
dravet syndrome

salleh
09-15-15, 06:45 PM
...in my wild and crazy youth ....I tried and used everything except downers and heroin .( no interest in something that puts me to sleep) ....they were fun but I didn't get addicted to anything .....could have been the times ....( I was 18 in 1968) and everyone I knew was taking all kinds of stuff ....it always surprises me when people my age tell me they didn't play with drugs the way everyone I knew did ...but I lived at the beach in Southern Cal ....even so, it was only a few years that I smoked it several times a week, I only bought about 10 bags in my life ...

....I don't know that any of us were addicted .....

...haven't smoked pot for about 30 years other that maybe 4 or 5 times, the stuff grown nowdays is so strong all it does it put me to sleep ....


......any drug I like to take puts me more able to take care of business, causes me to focus and get things done ...makes me more, not less a part of my life ....

...in conclusion ....I think it all depends on the person as to whether or not it's addictive ....

...BUt U absolutely believe there are medicinal uses for pot that are only helped by pot .....and that it MUST be available for those who need it ...chemo patients for example ....and that's just one of the uses ....

...on the other hand ....pot is just fine for recreational use the same way alcohol is ....and people do often need a way to wind down, and as long as they aren't driving a car , or engaged in activities that could harm themselves or others ....that's just fine with me ....it certainly causes less damages to the body than alcohol does ....

Gilthranon
09-15-15, 06:50 PM
Perso it makes me sick. And it's unhealthy so I don't. Like the smell.

Frustrated One
09-15-15, 09:29 PM
I was browsing through a book at the bookstore last week about this very subject. The author (an M.D.) was supportive of MMJ, but did say that the notion that it is not addictive is not true. He did say that it depends on the person.

I don't drink or do drugs, but I did chew tobacco for 20 years. When I was 33, my wife said "if you orphan these kids, I will never forgive you." (or something like that). I quit that day and never had any withdrawals. The entire time I did it, I never felt I could do without it, but I know others that go into withdrawals when quitting. So when it comes to pot or anything else, it really depends on the person and how his/her body reacts to it.

I used to be against it in any form, but now I am a proponent of MMJ and even recreational. If people (adults that is) want to put something in their bodies that is their business as long as they do not harm or endanger anyone else. If it wouldn't have an impact on my job and future jobs, I would consider getting a card, as I have constant pain throughout my body and nothing really seems to help.

I have also read that studies have been done that show it can be helpful with ADHD and Autism. Not sure if that is true or not and I am not smart enough to understand the science behind it, but I know it has some amazing medicinal effects.

Pilgrim
09-15-15, 09:36 PM
dravet syndrome

What's that?

Luvmybully
09-15-15, 10:11 PM
I did not read this thread! Just the title....

I smoked pot for over 20 years. HEAVILY, as in mutiple times a day, for several of those years.

I quit one day, cold turkey. It was making my blood sugar drop and making me get shaky, or pass out.

I never had any withdrawl symptoms. Just stopped and that was it.

I smoked cigarettes for several years also. I thougt I was going to DIE quitting. It was AWFUL! I was only able to quit the last time because I was pregnant and it made me vomit. (EVERYTHING made me vomit). But I still had terrible withdrawl from cigarettes.

mildadhd
09-15-15, 10:41 PM
Edit Opp sorry posted in wrong thread.


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daveddd
09-16-15, 10:55 AM
What's that?

Sorry the post that went with ir was deleted

Its an extremely severe and deadly form of childhood epilepsy that is unresponsive to all epilepy drugs

Its been shown that marijuana gives almost 100 remission

The children using it use it in an oil form. They dont smoke it


The states that dont allow it and the parents are scared or otherwise to break the law. The parents are forced to watch their children die knowing there is a extremely safe drug with no bad side effects that can help

Hathor
09-16-15, 02:56 PM
What is the difference between pot and medical pot?


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pot is bought from an illicit drug dealer who may know skunk from northern lights, but likely has no idea of Indica vs Sativia, THC to CBD ratios ect.

Medical pot varies more than illegal pot, for example I do not know how similar Oregon is to BC , but in general you know what you are getting, and the people behind the counter can give feedback on what strains ect may work for your needs.

daveddd
09-17-15, 04:00 PM
pot is bought from an illicit drug dealer who may know skunk from northern lights, but likely has no idea of Indica vs Sativia, THC to CBD ratios ect.

Medical pot varies more than illegal pot, for example I do not know how similar Oregon is to BC , but in general you know what you are getting, and the people behind the counter can give feedback on what strains ect may work for your needs.

I dont know if this is really an issue

At least nothing like bath tub meth vs adderal

dvdnvwls
09-17-15, 07:57 PM
I think the posts on this thread that directly refer to addiction show that there is no solid agreement on exactly what the word means. And I think that's why the discussion was necessary in the first place - if "addiction" doesn't even have a black-and-white, universally-agreed-upon definition, then it's going to remain tricky to tell whether a person is or isn't addicted.

But maybe the problem is that "addiction" is just too big of a concept to be useful every time. Maybe the components of addiction that sometimes get discussed - physiological effects, psychological effects, impairment on tasks, interference in one's life - are better discussed separately, and maybe the mess of trying to find an answer to "is someone addicted or not" just gets in the way.

(The term "sobriety" has certainly also become a word loaded with so much meaning that it's creaking under the strain. When sobriety meant "not currently drunk", no more and no less, then everyone knew what each other meant. Now, it's another minefield of "To me, it's..." - which is not necessarily a great way for a word to be, when we want to be able to communicate effectively with each other.)

KentUnknown
09-17-15, 09:51 PM
As a guy who has pretty much smoked it everyday for over 3 years... It is not addictive, in the same way other drugs are, such as sugar, cocaine, meth, yknow. Pot isn't addictive itself in my opinion, but you can get addicted to the MEMORY of how it was when you first started. I will probably never be able to get as stoned as I did back in high school, too much of a tolerance.
That being said, there is a reason I smoked everyday, and there has been several occasions )3-4) where I have taken break for over a month, the last one still running for the most part at 5 weeks, I have smoked a couple times. The reasons for smoking were due to anxiety that was unbareable and I needed to sleep.

Anywaaaays in conclusion imo it is not addictive, you could call it a relapse after stopping for a month, but the majority of people I know who have quit for months never said they were quitting for good, always called it a break. I don't know many people who can take a break from cigarettes without weaning, or a lot of hard discipline. Pot, it's like, when I am out of it, I am out of it, and I won't buy more. That's how easy it is, albeit my life is much more difficult when I don't smoke, due to so much stress I pile onto myself. Nothing hugs me and makes me feel as okay as pot does.

Hathor
09-17-15, 11:44 PM
I dont know if this is really an issue

At least nothing like bath tub meth vs adderal

It is a bigger issue than it may appear, at least to me.

I can smoke sativa and function very well, but indica makes me dopey, which does not go with ADHD-PI very well ;^)

OTO Hand, not many would take bath tub meth or bath salts for ADHD!

daveddd
09-19-15, 10:38 AM
I think the posts on this thread that directly refer to addiction show that there is no solid agreement on exactly what the word means. And I think that's why the discussion was necessary in the first place - if "addiction" doesn't even have a black-and-white, universally-agreed-upon definition, then it's going to remain tricky to tell whether a person is or isn't addicted.

But maybe the problem is that "addiction" is just too big of a concept to be useful every time. Maybe the components of addiction that sometimes get discussed - physiological effects, psychological effects, impairment on tasks, interference in one's life - are better discussed separately, and maybe the mess of trying to find an answer to "is someone addicted or not" just gets in the way.

(The term "sobriety" has certainly also become a word loaded with so much meaning that it's creaking under the strain. When sobriety meant "not currently drunk", no more and no less, then everyone knew what each other meant. Now, it's another minefield of "To me, it's..." - which is not necessarily a great way for a word to be, when we want to be able to communicate effectively with each other.)


I think we try to overcomplicate addiction sometimes. With brain chemical talk or physical or not physical addiction

To me its quite simple. Continuing to use, eat or do something despite negative consequences.

Greyhound1
09-19-15, 12:24 PM
I think we try to overcomplicate addiction sometimes. With brain chemical talk or physical or not physical addiction.

To me its quite simple. Continuing to use, eat or do something despite negative consequences.
I think many of us do things which have negative consequences that aren't addiction too. To me this difference is whether you can control it or it controls you.

daveddd
09-19-15, 12:43 PM
I think many of us do things which have negative consequences that aren't addiction too. To me this difference is whether you can control it or it controls you.

Can i ask why someone would continue to do something that had negative consequences if they could control it?

Unmanagable
09-19-15, 01:19 PM
Can i ask why someone would continue to do something that had negative consequences if they could control it?

Speaking from my personal experiences with food, I continued to eat what I knew wasn't healthy because it hadn't yet caused a negative enough consequence to make me wish to enact change, and it's a hell of a lot easier than having to think and plan.

I convinced myself through my preferred self-talk that "it can't be a s bad as (insert random perceived worst addiction here)", or, "If it really were that bad, I'd be dead already", etc. Once the consequences became uncomfortable or unbearable, I was forced to make a change, or remain miserable.

Edited to add: And that's the part that makes it so damn hard for me when I see others suffering needlessly. I know they've convinced themselves, just as I did. It rips my heart out seeing someone I love choose to keep destroying themselves, knowing their inner misery. All we can do is love them and hope they aren't suffering as badly as we remember feeling. It's the absolute hardest thing I've dealt with thus far.

Greyhound1
09-19-15, 01:53 PM
Can i ask why someone would continue to do something that had negative consequences if they could control it?

Because many times the negative consequences seem small or are only a possibility in the future. Sometimes the reward is or seems greater than the potential consequences at the time. Addiction has a lot more to do with control than just negative consequences.

I continue to eat at Taco Bell even though I usually experience negative consequences. Lol.

daveddd
09-19-15, 02:01 PM
Speaking from my personal experiences with food, I continued to eat what I knew wasn't healthy because it hadn't yet caused a negative enough consequence to make me wish to enact change, and it's a hell of a lot easier than having to think and plan.

I convinced myself through my preferred self-talk that "it can't be a s bad as (insert random perceived worst addiction here)", or, "If it really were that bad, I'd be dead already", etc. Once the consequences became uncomfortable or unbearable, I was forced to make a change, or remain miserable.

Edited to add: And that's the part that makes it so damn hard for me when I see others suffering needlessly. I know they've convinced themselves, just as I did. It rips my heart out seeing someone I love choose to keep destroying themselves, knowing their inner misery. All we can do is love them and hope they aren't suffering as badly as we remember feeling. It's the absolute hardest thing I've dealt with thus far.

I can relate Ive said that at the beginning of addictions

I do the same with cigs. Talk myself into believing they arent as bad as so and so

The talk ive learned is me not accepting that i cant just quit

daveddd
09-19-15, 02:10 PM
I think better phrasing for me would have been. Not being able to stop despite continued negative consequences

Greyhound1
09-19-15, 02:30 PM
I think better phrasing for me would have been. Not being able to stop despite continued negative consequences

I think not being able to stop for any reason may be more inclusive of addiction.
Like smoking for example. You may be addicted and want to quit for your health before any negative consequences occur.

daveddd
09-19-15, 02:40 PM
I think not being able to stop for any reason may be more inclusive of addiction.
Like smoking for example. You may be addicted and want to quit for your health before any negative consequences occur.

Well i think quitting for your health is preventing negative consequences

If they were healthy i wouldnt care if i quit or not

I dont know it makes sense to me. More then the brain chemical stuff and debates on wether addiction means physicsl or psychological do to me

So i go with it

sarahsweets
09-19-15, 02:53 PM
They often say in the recovery fellowships that insanity is doing the same thing expecting different results. Maybe the difference between what you guys are talking about could be something like that? I felt like I could not live without alcohol. 3 bottles a day starting at 4am all day everyday. I dont think I was ever sober at one point near the end. I had a devastating bottom(for me) and asked for help. What worked for me was AA. I took what mattered to me and ignored what didnt. I had some negative consequences but nothing that forced me to stop drinking. It was the emotional despair and the fact that my heart felt like it was breaking in two each morning as my hands shook while I reached for that bottle that helped me stop. I dont know if any of this makes sense in the context of what is being discussed.

daveddd
09-19-15, 04:06 PM
They often say in the recovery fellowships that insanity is doing the same thing expecting different results. Maybe the difference between what you guys are talking about could be something like that? I felt like I could not live without alcohol. 3 bottles a day starting at 4am all day everyday. I dont think I was ever sober at one point near the end. I had a devastating bottom(for me) and asked for help. What worked for me was AA. I took what mattered to me and ignored what didnt. I had some negative consequences but nothing that forced me to stop drinking. It was the emotional despair and the fact that my heart felt like it was breaking in two each morning as my hands shook while I reached for that bottle that helped me stop. I dont know if any of this makes sense in the context of what is being discussed.

It does and i know the emotional despair. To me that was a extremelt negative consequence. I also caused psin to my family seeing me like that

daveddd
09-19-15, 04:09 PM
If i was hooked on running and had to do it every morning i wouldnt consider it addiction

dvdnvwls
09-19-15, 06:41 PM
I think we try to overcomplicate addiction sometimes. With brain chemical talk or physical or not physical addiction

To me its quite simple. Continuing to use, eat or do something despite negative consequences.

Yes... except that just about everything has at least some negative consequences. And perhaps it's sort of taboo-ish to say so, but the things people get addicted to really do have significant positive consequences as well. The problem is not so much the existence of negative consequences, as the fact that the person who's addicted is vastly overestimating the positives and vastly underestimating the negatives.

dvdnvwls
09-19-15, 06:49 PM
I had some negative consequences but nothing that forced me to stop drinking.

Absolutely, that (and the whole of what you said) makes sense to me.

Again I think it's how you look at it - because you seem to be saying that, looking back on the way things used to be, the negative consequences were far worse for you (and for everybody) than you were thinking they were at the time.

And it seems to me that the first time of really seeing and really knowing "The negative consequences are far worse than I thought, and the positive consequences are far less than I thought" might have been a big realization.

KentUnknown
09-19-15, 07:57 PM
Maybe we also view the word addiction in a negative light too, sometimes.. haven't read all the posts here but yes, you can get too much of a good thing, and that can cause negative consequences.. I don't think then we should call it an addiction necessarily. NHL hockey players got addicted to hockey at a young age, and left school, make millions of dollars. Addiction at its finest, then theres people who haven't been pushed as hard by their environment and family, friends etc, and they turn to other mind distracting things, some become obsessive and addicted to those things, and thus are addicted, negatively.
I view it all as we can get addicted to ANYTHING, jogging, playing sports, video games, pop, sugar, weed, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, your phone, hobbies of all kinds, ANYTHING. It's up to us to be aware of ourselves and to stop ourselves when we notice our balance outside of those things becomes hindered directly, or even indirectly by that "addiction". So yes, you can ruin your life smoking weed I bet, you can ruin your life drinking too much, eating too much, ruin your life working too much, its about balance. Maybe that's when we should call it an addiction, if we are using it negatively.. When the balance is thrown off by doing those things too much. I guess that means I got addicted to working too much, to the paycheques, and now find myself without balance, which has led to other issues. At least I am aware of it, I guess.

I guess sometimes we just think of things in the context of if its legal or illegal, greasy or clean. Sugar lights up the same part of your brain as cocaine, don't you know.. and lots of people have a big coffee first thing in the morning, probably like some coke addicts have a line when they wake up, ones legal, one isn't. I look at everything as a potential to become addicted to. Can ALWAYS have too much of a good thing.

dvdnvwls
09-19-15, 08:17 PM
It's up to us to be aware of ourselves and to stop ourselves when we notice our balance outside of those things becomes hindered directly, or even indirectly by that "addiction".

This (especially the part in bold) is IMO almost exactly the problem, in cases of (for lack of suitable terminology) "real, serious addiction". The person loses the ability to stop themselves, for any reason - at least for a time.

I said "almost" because I wonder about the awareness part. I really don't know to what extent people actually lose awareness - how much of it is that they are sort of "burying" or "submerging" or hiding that awareness from themselves, and how much of it is that they really truly don't know anymore.

KentUnknown
09-19-15, 08:54 PM
This (especially the part in bold) is IMO almost exactly the problem, in cases of (for lack of suitable terminology) "real, serious addiction". The person loses the ability to stop themselves, for any reason - at least for a time.

I said "almost" because I wonder about the awareness part. I really don't know to what extent people actually lose awareness - how much of it is that they are sort of "burying" or "submerging" or hiding that awareness from themselves, and how much of it is that they really truly don't know anymore.

Somewhere along the way they lost the balance perhaps without noticing and it spiraled out of control due to other factors. I come to think of the science experiment, where they had rats in a cage and gave them one regular water bottle, another with heroin(maybe cocaine) laced water.
They drank from both but all the rats became addicted to the heroin laced water. THen they tried something new, they gave them a PALACE, a disneyland of rat castles, and did the same experiment.. They all drank from both again, and more then once at first, but most if not all the rats dropped the heroin laced water for regular water.. Makes you wonder, is it our society, our environment, our system that creates so many addiction problems? It's something to think about, for sure.
My point being I am sure that addiction is very debilitating and very very gripping, and I know it is. My point is just that, what if, a big IF of course and will take a long time to happen, but what if our environments were changed to be positive, would we drop the addictions? I like to think so.

daveddd
09-20-15, 07:37 AM
Well its just something i picked up in one of the many court ordered rehabs i was in years ago

It still makes sense to me

Polymorphed
10-30-15, 10:10 PM
Cannabinoids have amazing health benefits on multiple fronts, but particularly their neuroprotective functions (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21420365). There are a number of studies underway presently exploring the role cannabinoids can have in the repair and growth of brain cells in stroke survivors.

Cannabis also plays a role in providing pain relief to chronic pain sufferers. The effective use of cannibis as a nueroprotective agent and the methods of its production are certainly in the earily stages of development. I really do expect to see cannabis become a part of prescription medicine in the not too distant future. Hopefully within the lifetimes of our children! I expect it has the potential to make a big difference.

As for recreational pot, well I don't know anything for sure, but I think that smoking it could produce toxic metabolites and oxides as a part of the chemical reaction to the heat source. I have no means to evaluate the risks objectively though, but there are other ways to take cannabis that are certainly more healthy. There are transdermal and sublingual oil tinctures prepared in labs already being used by many in various legalised states. These laboratories have developed processes that allow them to manipulate how physically or mentally sedating or stimulating the oil is etc.

Sounds like a much better solution to me. Oils can also be developed for vaporisation, which can help reduce the stress of physical habit associations being dropped cold-turkey.

The amount of THC and CBD and their relative ratios are completely uncontrolled and this is certainly not an approach endorsed by modern medicine. Calculated doses and patient conformity are necessary fundamentals to allow response predictability ensuring long term health is not compromised.

The problem with sourcing weed illegaly (aside from the obious legal risks!) and smoking it is that there is no measured and consistent dosage regime, so it will ultimately lead to increased tolerance over time. One can come to rely on cannabis at this point, whether for relaxing, sleeping or just getting by. Going above the optimal therapeutic doseage range of any drug of this nature will lead to addiction. I don't have any idea of the potential ramifications of an addiction to cannabis. Bare in mind that many illicit drugs have severe ramifications on physical and mental health.

Perhaps if it were globally legalised there would be more incentive for funding scientific research and, as such, we could one day look at smoking the raw weed as a silly thing we used to do. Instead, we'll pull out a tiny vaporiser and take our prescribed dose and benefit from the addiction free health and social rewards. Just my take :)

Husky42
01-22-16, 01:30 PM
Yes, yes and yes. And before anybody jumps down my throat.

I've used cannabis for 16 years, I stopped smoking just yesterday.. I work for a medical dispensary and sell Medical Cannabis daily. I was smoking several grams of oil a week ($50 a gram)

I do believe if you have a pre-existing mental health condition you should not use cannabis.

When I was a child I was ruled ADHD but my parents never put me on meds and i managed OK until my teens, then I found pot and i used it to stay calm and self medicate allowed me to "zone in" on games and activities. Even woke me up, people would smoke and get tired, i'd smoke and get awake but still "calm"

I now suffer from severe mood swings an inability to regulate my mood. Delusions of grandeur, manipulation, depression (although triggered by certain thoughts usually) Mania, no precision in my thoughts. Lack of fucus, no goals or direction in life and no understanding of me as a person. Impulsive behavior and identity issues.

The mental health problems only got stronger as I aged and the more I smoked.

I love cannabis and i firmly believe if a person does not have mental health problem they should be allowed to smoke/use it however they see fit.

I do also believe Cannabis has pushed me closer to psychosis then i ever would have been without it. My grandmother is Bipolar and in her 70's I'm 32, mother is 40 something and also suffers but she self medicates (not safe) Now I'm the only male in our entire family to suffer from mental health problems as well.

I see my mental state decreasing far faster than theirs and its terrifying.

Cannabis while not solely to blame (genetics play a role also i'm told) did IMO play a part in my accelerated decay. Its may not impact a person with mental health at all but honestly now that im suffering from that gamble i can only ask others to reconsider their use.

Some of you will read that and say I'm fine, what a joke this guy is. Yea that is how I thought as well. Weed was my life.. I sold it, grew it, smoked it. I've now thrown my hands up and walked away from it with a smile on my face knowing i'm on a path to recovery and bettering myself.

420_easter
02-07-16, 02:22 PM
the fallowing is purely my opinion based behind some fact..

the question at hand.. is pot addictive? absolutely psychologically addictive what they mean is it's not physically addictive like the substances that most likely ruined their life amphetimates/opiate's/cocaine/opiate's which when abused cause a physical addiction as your body needs these to actually function properly

the main difference in my opinion is when something is psychologically addictive it's more of a "i want this really bad feeling"

when something is physically addictive you need this in your body or else you get really sick and you're unable to function normally without it.

I've seen both of these kinds of addictions in my life and watched them destroy opportunities and all around people's lifes

JonDukes312
02-12-16, 09:54 PM
I would say it was extremely addictive for me, after a situation were i got in trouble with the law and was depressed and was still trying to go to school and live a normal life. Weed was all i thought about, because it made me forget all my troubles; i even would try function but i was messy and would end doing something stupid like sending my professors emails at 1am in the morning asking them questions about essay that was due like in 24 hours i would say it ruined me my life at the time but i was doing so much more things too like drinking and all sorts of drugs.

daveddd
02-13-16, 10:17 AM
the fallowing is purely my opinion based behind some fact..

the question at hand.. is pot addictive? absolutely psychologically addictive what they mean is it's not physically addictive like the substances that most likely ruined their life amphetimates/opiate's/cocaine/opiate's which when abused cause a physical addiction as your body needs these to actually function properly

the main difference in my opinion is when something is psychologically addictive it's more of a "i want this really bad feeling"

when something is physically addictive you need this in your body or else you get really sick and you're unable to function normally without it.

I've seen both of these kinds of addictions in my life and watched them destroy opportunities and all around people's lifes

amphetamines and cocaine are psychologically addictive

opiates , benzos , alcohol and probably a few others are your physical addiction

but really id say those are both , it takes a day to a week to physically withdrawal from those substances

yet 99 out of 100 would still want that substance after the physical part is over

double whammy i guess

Pixelatedmind
02-13-16, 04:34 PM
What made me decide to stop it completely was the fact that it intensifies my hypersensitivity (to touch) to very annoying degrees, it made me sleepy, it exaggerates my inattentive symptoms of ADHD and anxiety.