View Full Version : Aromotherapy/Essential oils & Anxiety?


demfabbones
08-27-15, 04:36 PM
I recently reached out to my fb friends with advice on how to combat anxiety. (I'm already medicated for it.) A ton of people recommended supplementing with essential oils. Most had different ideas about which ones work best, though bergamot, geranium, orange, lemon and lavender were all popular favorites. Someone suggested I just go to the store and smell them myself to see what made me feel less anxious. They're too expensive to truly experiment with. Anyone tried this or have any suggestions?

I went to the natural food store to check it out and ended up buying "rescue remedy" but after 5 minutes of googling I'm pretty convinced any effects are just placebo :rolleyes:

Unmanagable
08-27-15, 05:07 PM
My massage therapist swears by bergamot for her anxiety. I feel soothed by the blend she uses, as well as peppermint, grapefruit, lavender, and eucalyptus. Depending on the situation, the environment, and what my senses are craving that particular day.

Be mindful of the quality of the oils you're buying. We have a grocery here that sells organic versions. They are a bit pricey, so the advice of going to smell them first is really good. I'd return the rescue remedy if it's unopened.

Another thing that helps me relax are hot baths with epsom salt, along with a few (3-4) drops of whichever essential oil I'm feeling that day. It's incredibly refreshing and soothing to my physical and mental being.

I also make my own body oil with a blend of unrefined, cold pressed, organic coconut oil mixed with peppermint, mainly, but also really dig the grapefruit essence. My next experiment will be lavender. However, be mindful of sun exposure when using the citrus based oils. I save those for cooler weather and it helps transport me back to warmth, a little.

Enjoy experimenting, if you decide to.

vanessahammond
12-28-15, 09:37 PM
It has been proven that essential oils have a lot of uses but before you decide to use one, make sure that you look it up online first and check out customer product reviews. This is to make sure that you get the results that you want without compromising your health and safety. If I have to recommend one brand, you should opt for Healing Solutions. They have a vast array of products to choose from and I've been using them for a very long time because of their effectiveness and reliability.

burger
12-29-15, 01:12 AM
Lavender seems to have some science behind it. Two up arrows out of three for anxiety on examine.com. If you google lavender pubmed there's some science stuff you can read.

https://examine.com/supplements/lavender/

Unmanagable
12-29-15, 07:57 AM
I have a lavender spray made with essential oil and distilled water that I like to spritz on my pillow at night and often use as a body spray during the day. Very soothing to my senses.

There used to be a lady at the farmers' market I was vending at who would come out during her lunch break to smell the lavender plants and products to ease her stress.

If you're not familiar with essential oils, please DO NOT INGEST THEM!! I've read many articles where people are suggesting you add them to smoothies and other recipes, or adding them to water to take medicinally, but that's a big red flag in my book, and my innards.

Little Missy
12-29-15, 07:59 AM
Just reading the heading is giving me anxiety thinking about smells.

Lunacie
12-29-15, 03:44 PM
Just reading the heading is giving me anxiety thinking about smells.

Ditto here.

Before Christmas, someone on facebook was suggesting spraying perfume on greeting cards/envelopes before mailing.

OMG! I explained why that's a really bad idea. Even if your cards are not coming to my house, where I could have a very bad reaction to the scent, your card may have spent some time in contact with mail that actually was coming to me, and even that shared scent can cause a bad reaction.

What I find most calming, especially when I'm having a reaction to some scent or perfume, is to sniff coffee. It helps to clear out the unwelcome scents.

Oddly, I don't drink coffee. I just keep some ground coffee handy for sniffing.

Unmanagable
12-29-15, 05:58 PM
Ditto here.

Before Christmas, someone on facebook was suggesting spraying perfume on greeting cards/envelopes before mailing.

OMG! I explained why that's a really bad idea. Even if your cards are not coming to my house, where I could have a very bad reaction to the scent, your card may have spent some time in contact with mail that actually was coming to me, and even that shared scent can cause a bad reaction.

What I find most calming, especially when I'm having a reaction to some scent or perfume, is to sniff coffee. It helps to clear out the unwelcome scents.

Oddly, I don't drink coffee. I just keep some ground coffee handy for sniffing.

What a great idea for the coffee I don't use anymore!! I "smudge that s***" with the sage stick when I'm at home and somebody pops a new smell on me.

But having coffee on me for out in public might bring much relief. Now watch me get pulled aside for suspected huffing. lol

Lunacie
12-29-15, 06:47 PM
What a great idea for the coffee I don't use anymore!! I "smudge that s***" with the sage stick when I'm at home and somebody pops a new smell on me.

But having coffee on me for out in public might bring much relief. Now watch me get pulled aside for suspected huffing. lol


:giggle:

KarmanMonkey
01-08-16, 11:24 AM
There's a term used in autism circles called a "sensory diet". Basically it boils down to a simple concept:

Everyone has different needs in terms of their senses, and identifying and satisfying those needs can greatly improve our quality of life. Examples:

Touch: Some people find soft feathery touch therapeutic, some prefer bear hug type pressure.

Sight: Lighting, colours, motion, shapes; all of these will have an impact on your mood.

Hearing: Pitch, rhythm, volume, variety (for example, I need a certain level of white noise to concentrate, or familiar music. I also need a certain amount of variety in the sounds I hear in a day, and there are certain tones that will even trigger migraines)

Smell: Everyone has their own scents that will trigger emotions. Vanilla has a primal affect on me, as does the smell of mirepoix cooking. Lavender I find therapeutic in small doses. That being said, I simply can't go within a dozen yards of a place that sells bath oils and the like, and I need to hold my breath if I'm in the purfume corner of the department store.

Essential oils are basically a quick and dirty way of satisfying your olfactory sensory needs. I feel that the people who benefit the most from them tend to be the people who are experiencing a lack of positive sensory experiences in their lives.

Kunga Dorji
01-08-16, 11:31 AM
I recently reached out to my fb friends with advice on how to combat anxiety. (I'm already medicated for it.) A ton of people recommended supplementing with essential oils. Most had different ideas about which ones work best, though bergamot, geranium, orange, lemon and lavender were all popular favorites. Someone suggested I just go to the store and smell them myself to see what made me feel less anxious. They're too expensive to truly experiment with. Anyone tried this or have any suggestions?

I went to the natural food store to check it out and ended up buying "rescue remedy" but after 5 minutes of googling I'm pretty convinced any effects are just placebo :rolleyes:

So- you googled but you did not test for yourself?
I find that for myself these things work well when more extreme problems like hunger, dehydration and toxicity from bad diet have been taken care of:
http://anp.sagepub.com/content/49/12/1221.extract

However- they work best if you have been taught how by an experienced practitioner. It is also a mater of where they are applied- and there are particular key acupuncture points where each oil works best. I am still road testing this one- so I cant make any definitive comments yet.However- what I am doing is working well so far.