View Full Version : Epilepsy and Flashing Lights (split from "legislating mediocrity" thread)


BellaVita
09-25-15, 10:57 PM
I just educated my area of the gaming community on ableism. They use the 'r' word there a lot, and I did manage to get someone to delete a very insulting image about autism.

Sorry Dvd, I've got to say your avatar is very unsettling for me. I have epilepsy so uhh if you don't mind changing it. My arm is sort of tingling is all.

Speaking of epilepsy, so many bikers insist on using their flashing bike lights.

They don't care that it can cause a seizure in someone, they just want to be safe. (And don't care about the potential safety of others)

Truth is, they're not really safe if someone crashes into them.

I've heard of people with epilepsy literally jumping into a bush when they see a bike with flashing lights.

Frustrated One
09-25-15, 11:29 PM
Speaking of epilepsy, so many bikers insist on using their flashing bike lights.

They don't care that it can cause a seizure in someone, they just want to be safe. (And don't care about the potential safety of others)

Truth is, they're not really safe if someone crashes into them.

I've heard of people with epilepsy literally jumping into a bush when they see a bike with flashing lights.

What about the safety of the bikers? I am athletic and I use one of those when I run at night and and also recommend bikers use them as well. We cannot alter every activity we do or the words we say because someone MIGHT be offended or hurt. I don't think people who are being safe while exercising are intentionally not caring about others. That is like not allowing peanut butter in school lunches. Yes there is a possibility that some kid will have an alergy to it, but then there are those who have extreme allergies to strawberries and other things. Something is always going to affect someone and some words or phrases are always going to offend someone.

I don't mean to sound insensitive, but we cannot
alter our lives because of it. I also think we should.NOT legislate what people are allowed to say. Yes some people will intentionally be insensitive, but that is on them. We already have too much unnecessary legislation and government involvement in our lives.

If I missed something, please let me know.

dvdnvwls
09-26-15, 12:05 AM
If I missed something, please let me know.

Ummm... lights that are bright but don't flash??

BellaVita
09-26-15, 12:10 AM
What about the safety of the bikers?

They are much more safe with a non-flashing bike light.

This also puts the bikers at risk to have a flashing light, because someone who doesn't know they are prone to seizures might crash into them.

I am athletic and I use one of those when I run at night and and also recommend bikers use them as well. We cannot alter every activity we do or the words we say because someone MIGHT be offended or hurt.

This isn't about people being offended, but about the possibility of someone getting severely injured or killed.

I don't think people who are being safe while exercising are intentionally not caring about others.

No, of course not. Learning about what is truly safe and what is dangerous is important though, instead of letting ignorance persist.

That is like not allowing peanut butter in school lunches. Yes there is a possibility that some kid will have an alergy to it, but then there are those who have extreme allergies to strawberries and other things.

That's a terrible analogy.

People allow peanut butter in school lunches because those allergic can choose to turn away the peanut butter.

Those who have seizures don't get to do that - instead they are unexpectedly subjected to the flashing lights that could cause a seizure.

They don't get a choice like the peanut butter kids do.

A few seconds of staring into the flashing lights before being able to look away can be too late.

Something is always going to affect someone and some words or phrases are always going to offend someone.

Okay, a better analogy would be drinking and driving.

People don't drink and drive and say "it's okay, it's only affecting me and not the other drivers around me."

That would be ridiculous and unsafe, and so is biking or running with a flashing light.

I don't mean to sound insensitive, but we cannot
alter our lives because of it.

So it's okay to potentially alter the life of someone else, to kill them as a result of refusing to not wear a flashing light?

That would be cruel.

Frustrated One
09-26-15, 12:49 AM
Sorry, but I wear a flashing light on my arm when I run. It has 3 settings: steady, slow blinking and fast blinking. I always use the fast blinking one, as it is the most noticeable and safest in my opinion. It is not a strobe though. I want to make sure I am seen and not get hit. I certainly don't want anyone to have a seizure, but I also want to be safe myself. I guess we are talking about strobes? If there is a way to reduce seizures in others without compromising the safety of bikers, runners, etc, I am all for it, but it is not something that should be legislated. What about emergency vehicles? What if the emergency vehicle could not get to the seizure victim in time because the lights were not allowed? Okay, I am being silly here, but what is the option? Non-flashing lights is not it. Again with the peanut butter sandwiches. Harleys make me almost homicidal 'cause the noise is excruciating, but we cannot outlaw them (although it could legitimately be considered noise pollution).

Frustrated One
09-26-15, 01:28 AM
No The reason some schools do not allow them is because some kids can go into anaphylactic shock because there are peanuts or other legumes in the area. Sometimes they cannot turn away in time because they don't know they are there.

It is not safer to run or ride with a non-flashing light. That is why police cruisers have their lights flashing when they have someone pulled over or at the scene of an accident.

Drunk drivers are also attracted to flashing amber lights such as those on a vehicle's hazard lights. Do hazard lights present a danger too?

I never said it was okay to potentially alter someone's life.

The reason I am on this forum is because some of my family members and I have traits similar to many on here and I appreciate the support I have gotten. I take issue with those who make statements saying that those who won't alter their activities because others want them to are cruel. I don't want to insult anyone on here, as I find that is counter-productive to the intention of this forum, but I become annoyed when others try to find a way to force people to behave or not behave in a certain way.

I am not going to go back and forth on this one.

BellaVita
09-26-15, 01:51 AM
Sorry, but I wear a flashing light on my arm when I run. It has 3 settings: steady, slow blinking and fast blinking. I always use the fast blinking one, as it is the most noticeable and safest in my opinion.

Actually, the faster the blinking the less safe it is and the more likely it will induce a seizure in someone.

Flashing bicycle lights or other LED lights

That is listed as a possible trigger for seizures.

You can read more here:
www dot epilepsysociety.org.uk/photosensitive-epilepsy#.VgYv8MRHaK0

It is not a strobe though. I want to make sure I am seen and not get hit.

It doesn't have to be a strobe, flashing lights (bike lights, running lights) can certainly induce seizures no problem.

Please listen to the advice about wearing a non-flashing light.

I certainly don't want anyone to have a seizure, but I also want to be safe myself. I guess we are talking about strobes? If there is a way to reduce seizures in others without compromising the safety of bikers, runners, etc, I am all for it, but it is not something that should be legislated. What about emergency vehicles? What if the emergency vehicle could not get to the seizure victim in time because the lights were not allowed? Okay, I am being silly here, but what is the option? Non-flashing lights is not it. Again with the peanut butter sandwiches. Harleys make me almost homicidal 'cause the noise is excruciating, but we cannot outlaw them (although it could legitimately be considered noise pollution).

No, we are talking about LED flashing bike lights.

You are mistaken, it is compromising the safety of bikers and runners because they might get hit by someone having a seizure!

Peanut butter sandwiches are different as I said, those allergic can choose to not eat the peanut butter sandwich while those who have seizures cannot choose to not be exploded to an already-flashing bike light.

Read this quote:
Flashing lights trigger seizures. This means the strobes people put on bikes, the flashing hazard lights used for almost anything, well, hazardous, the flashing lights on emergency vehicles (which is pretty counterproductive), and the flashing lights that go along with some smoke alarms (also counterproductive). People having seizures matters.

And:
Besides the obvious danger during the actual seizure (hitting your head if itís a tonic-clonic, crashing if youíre operating a car or bike, falling, etc.) thereís the danger that comes from not knowing whatís going on, where you are, and where your home is, and how to get there for hours after your seizure.

(Quotes taken from http:// speakingupanyway.wordpress.com/2012/01/07/flashing-lights-trigger-seizures-so-dont-use-them/)

Please recognize how much you are putting others in danger.

BellaVita
09-26-15, 02:32 AM
Typo in last post - can't edit - I meant "those who have seizures cannot choose to not be exposed to an already-flashing bike light."

sarahsweets
09-26-15, 07:52 AM
I just jumped into this discussion so I am unsure of the context but speaking about peanut butter allergies...I used to think like you guys at least think that those with PB allergies have it easier because they can choose to not eat PB. I used to think the kid with this allergy in my kids' class had no right to request that my daughter not bring in certain treats because of their PB allergy. PFFT! My kid should be able to have what she wants and if your kid cant then too bad. I felt this way until a child with a PB allergy tried another child's snack treat and went into shock and had their throat almost close up. Thank God the nurse was near and had an epi-pen. So, at least in this regard, other people can make this accomodation to ensure the safety of those with PB allergies. Very similar to what you are talking about Bella.

BellaVita
09-26-15, 08:10 AM
I just jumped into this discussion so I am unsure of the context but speaking about peanut butter allergies...I used to think like you guys at least think that those with PB allergies have it easier because they can choose to not eat PB. I used to think the kid with this allergy in my kids' class had no right to request that my daughter not bring in certain treats because of their PB allergy. PFFT! My kid should be able to have what she wants and if your kid cant then too bad. I felt this way until a child with a PB allergy tried another child's snack treat and went into shock and had their throat almost close up. Thank God the nurse was near and had an epi-pen. So, at least in this regard, other people can make this accomodation to ensure the safety of those with PB allergies. Very similar to what you are talking about Bella.

You're right, I didn't know that until someone explained to me later that even someone who is allergic to peanut butter can have a reaction just standing near them. (Or something like that)

Flashing lights and peanut butter should be banned! Lol

Unmanagable
09-26-15, 09:27 AM
What about flashing street lights, turn signals, advertisements, etc.? I don't know about epilepsy well enough to know how severely each affects it, but there's a whole lot of flashing going on out there. I can't imagine trying to navigate it all while driving or walking through some of the bigger cities, especially.

Lunacie
09-26-15, 01:36 PM
I don't drive a lot at night. In the past I've seen bikes with non-flashing lights.
No problem there. But last week I was out late and came across a couple of
bikes with flashing lights. I don't have epilepsy, but the lights can cause a
migraine headache for me. I do my best not to drive when I have a migraine
as it's unsafe for several reasons.

Lights on cars also bother me a lot, whether it's sunlight flashing off chrome or
glass by day, or headlights and turn signals at night. It may not be very safe
but I drive with one hand while blocking my view of the light with my other
hand.

Both of my sisters have experienced epilepsy, and have had attacks that were
triggered by the flashing red/blue bar on top of cop cars.