View Full Version : Off label medications to treat autism/Aspergers


ToInfinity
10-01-15, 08:22 AM
Hi guys,

Would you guys try or would you be interested in trying off label medications to treat social deficits of autism/Aspergers.

I'd like to know how you go with them and what part of the spectrum you are on if you've have.

I'm interested in asking my psychiatrist to see if I can give ago. Some drugs work for different subtypes in the spectrum. I've read about clonazepam, Arbaclofen, Baclofen as treatment, how people have reported improvements in sociability and how the meds have gone through phase 2/3 in clinical trials with positive results. It is still in trials and I thought that since it'll be decades away for ASD treatment, it wouldn't hurt to try off labels as I have my psychiatrist supervision.

I found this blog of a medical researcher who has been doing a lot of research in drug alternatives based on science.

http://epiphanyasd.blogspot.com.au/?m=1

I hope there'd be treatment for social deficits. I hope to be socially intuitive. It's not just because of the thought of really wanting to make friends, interpersonal, maintaining friendships and the such. But also relationships and family. I feel sad for the child that the father doesn't know how to play with his son, that the father doesn't know imaginative pretend play, that the father can't read a picture book to his son expressively when he tucks his child in bed, I feel sad for the child growing up not having a great father figure, I feel sad of the wife because the father can't small talk, his interests are so limited that it just bores the wife talking practically the same topic. I wouldn't want to hurt people's lives. The future looks bleak. I feel like needing to stay away from creating troubles and this makes life depressing. This is why I'm trying to do some research on what universities are currently testing.

Oxytocin research is looking promising.

ASD is very heterogenous. There are some in the spectrum who are really high functioning like you guys and are fine with life, there are some who still struggle with eg social skills even if they learn, then there are the classic autism who really need the treatment.

fracturedstory
10-17-15, 09:09 PM
Nope nope nope.
Isn't clonazepam an anti-psychotic?
Still nope.

The way I learn social skills is by observing others then reflecting and then finally by using such social skills and hoping I'm getting it right.

I'm not taking any more meds beside my anti-anxiety meds. The only side effects I get on them is that I get a bit more hungry and that's fine. Ritalin helped with my autistic symptoms and made me really sociable but the side effects were just so severe they've scared me off taking any more medications.

It's not a very good idea to treat autism when you are desperate to overcome it. Some parents have gone to cruel and illegal lengths to cure their children of it.

BellaVita
10-17-15, 09:17 PM
Clonazepam helped me with anxiety and sleep, but didn't help with social skills. (It's a benzodiazepine)

I'm an undiagnosed autistic btw.

For me, I spent hours upon hours for years reading books and internet articles on human behavior, and would also pay attention to people in real life especially learning tone of voice. I also spend lots of time memorizing scripts, certain things to say in different scenarios. This is the main thing I rely on nowadays. Having to learn this stuff by memorization alone can be brutal, but it really is the only way as far as I can tell.

I can "act neurotypical" for short periods of time, but honestly it's just exhausting. It's a performance.

I am not sure they will be able to create a medication that somehow improves social skills, that would be interesting to see.

daveddd
10-18-15, 09:42 AM
ive seen the oxytocin thing and it seems to have been replicated a few times

it also seems to be tried on social anxiety and emotion avoidance (which is my issues , im not autistic)

id snort some if i could and it helped (snorting is the method they are using, due to blood brain barrieir issues or something)

Polymorphed
12-10-15, 09:58 PM
ive seen the oxytocin thing and it seems to have been replicated a few times

it also seems to be tried on social anxiety and emotion avoidance (which is my issues , im not autistic)

id snort some if i could and it helped (snorting is the method they are using, due to blood brain barrieir issues or something)

As crazy as this sounds, it has foundation in science. Oxytocin is a peptide based neurohypophysial hormone (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurohypophysial_hormone). It will be destroyed by the digestion process and never make it into the blood stream, let alone the brain.

Snorting it would facilitate absorption without these issues. I have not researched the potential side effects of doing so though, but I daresay it would not be for everyone (especially if sensory processing is a problem) and I can't expect any professional support in administering it this way.

Suppository or intra-venous injection would be more likely to be supported.

Please bare in mind that this is the drug injected in order to suppress premature labour in expectant women and should not be obtained without medical guidance OR a significant level of understanding of what to expect.

wonderboy
01-21-16, 08:43 PM
As crazy as this sounds, it has foundation in science. Oxytocin is a peptide based neurohypophysial hormone (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurohypophysial_hormone). It will be destroyed by the digestion process and never make it into the blood stream, let alone the brain..


I have initiated some research concerning oxytocin.

Question: Can it only be injected, or does it come in pill form?

Cyllya
01-29-16, 01:47 AM
I don't have the social issues described by most aspies (I have the traits to some degree, but they're not impairing), but I do have a lot of problems with executive function, hypersensitivity, social anxiety, and to a lesser extent, some kind of communication problem where people tend to only get the gist of what I say. The EF and hypersensitivity in particular are pretty crappy and life-ruining, so any discussion of autism cures gets my attention, and I'd be pretty quick to jump on any drug that might help with those.

I don't care if it's off-label, but that can make it harder to get. There was that one dopamine-boosting anti-viral whose name escapes me that supposedly helps with EF problems, and I wanted to give it a shot, but my doctor refused to prescribe it. :(

Oxytocin is a hormone your body normally produces when doing things like sex, hugging, giving birth, or other physical contact. Those of us who have an unusually low amount of physical contact with other people probably have a lower than normal oxytocin level, and I wouldn't be surprised if we're having all sorts of problems just because of that.

wonderboy
02-19-16, 07:05 PM
Abilify has shown some efficacy. It is FDA approved for irritation associated with autism...

Lunacie
02-19-16, 07:26 PM
We did a trial of Abilify for my autistic granddaughter. Side effects were bad and it didn't help. Might help others.

As far as meds that don't work in pill form to cross the blood brain barriar, I see they are developing more meds in the form of nasal sprays.

My daughter recently linked me to one that is used for Migraine Disorder which is also a neurological disorder.