View Full Version : Future Directions in ADHD Etiology Research


daveddd
10-02-15, 08:50 AM
a good summary of where etiolgogy research currently is and needs to go by joel nigg


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321791/

SB_UK
10-02-15, 10:38 AM
a good summary of where etiolgogy research currently is and needs to go by joel nigg


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321791/


The hope in the field is that new insights into fundamental prevention can emerge.

.....

Amtram
10-26-15, 12:12 PM
Keep in mind that epigenetic effects need an underlying genetic code or predisposition in order to create a change in genetic expression, and that not all factors that are implicated in changed in gene expression are guaranteed to produce that change. As well, methylation in the same gene locus may produce other, possibly unrelated changes.

Knowing that an environmental factor can produce an epigenetic change under controlled conditions does not necessarily mean those changes can be controlled in real human environments. This paper is only a brief overview of a lot of highly detailed research that offers findings with potential research applications, not findings of causation. If you were to read even only a few of the papers cited, you would see the complexity that makes the statements promising but not absolute.

These findings could be compared to the research that found that unrepentant killers shared a unique piece of genetic code, but that only those who were exposed to the trauma of witnessing violence before a certain age seemed to be correlated with later acts of homicide. Others who carried the same code but had not been exposed to violence didn't become killers, nor did those who witnessed violence at a later age. Obviously, there are people who don't carry the gene or don't witness violence who kill other people, but the study found differences in psychological profiles between the gene-carriers and everyone else.

So here is a case that points to an emotional, environmental epigenetic effect, but even there it demonstrates no absolutes that could be predicted or controlled in the real world. It's just something interesting that could be of use, similar to much of what was presented in this article.

Since we still see an extremely high level of heritability with ADHD, information on controlling known aggravating factors might be useful to new parents with a family history of ADHD, but less valuable to everyone in general. Trying to mitigate these factors may or may not be helpful, may or may not be possible, because epigenetics is not deterministic.

daveddd
10-31-15, 07:46 PM
Keep in mind that epigenetic effects need an underlying genetic code or predisposition in order to create a change in genetic expression, and that not all factors that are implicated in changed in gene expression are guaranteed to produce that change. As well, methylation in the same gene locus may produce other, possibly unrelated changes.

Knowing that an environmental factor can produce an epigenetic change under controlled conditions does not necessarily mean those changes can be controlled in real human environments. This paper is only a brief overview of a lot of highly detailed research that offers findings with potential research applications, not findings of causation. If you were to read even only a few of the papers cited, you would see the complexity that makes the statements promising but not absolute.

These findings could be compared to the research that found that unrepentant killers shared a unique piece of genetic code, but that only those who were exposed to the trauma of witnessing violence before a certain age seemed to be correlated with later acts of homicide. Others who carried the same code but had not been exposed to violence didn't become killers, nor did those who witnessed violence at a later age. Obviously, there are people who don't carry the gene or don't witness violence who kill other people, but the study found differences in psychological profiles between the gene-carriers and everyone else.

So here is a case that points to an emotional, environmental epigenetic effect, but even there it demonstrates no absolutes that could be predicted or controlled in the real world. It's just something interesting that could be of use, similar to much of what was presented in this article.

Since we still see an extremely high level of heritability with ADHD, information on controlling known aggravating factors might be useful to new parents with a family history of ADHD, but less valuable to everyone in general. Trying to mitigate these factors may or may not be helpful, may or may not be possible, because epigenetics is not deterministic.

thanks

i like to go by joel niggs researchs personally though

although i respect your opinion

Amtram
11-01-15, 08:28 AM
I'm a big fan of Nigg as well, but he's not dismissing genetics by exploring epigenetics. You can't have epigenetics without genetics!