View Full Version : Smoking


SneezeSnout
10-18-15, 12:30 AM
I have smoked cigarettes for the past 15 years or more. For the first 10 years or so, I always had a soft pack of Camels in my pocket. Then after a trip to India I changed to Marlboro Red 72. Throughout the majority of my smoking career, I was a pack a day smoker.

But, back in June 2015 my nephew came to me and said, "SneezeSnout I know you really like to smoke, but I wish you would quit because I like having you around; I want you to see me graduate from school." Needless to say, I cried that night after he left. :( Ultimately, I made the choice to stop smoking before I turned 30.

My success was due to many changes. But the most significant where the adjustments made to my behavior including avoiding situations where I previously smoked. As a result, I haven't had a smoke for over 3 months. :D

With this week marking the success of going past 90 days, I have yet to experience withdrawal or cravings. Does anyone else have similar experiences? Has anybody stopped smoking and didn't experience notable withdrawal or cravings?

TangledWebs
10-18-15, 12:50 AM
Wow, you smoked for 15 years and didn't experience any withdrawal symptoms or cravings when you quit? You're lucky! I smoked for less than a year and I had to use nicotine gum, patches, and the occasional e-cigarette to help me quit. I was moody, depressed, and had cravings out the bumhole.

Congratulations though! 90 days! :yes:

dvdnvwls
10-18-15, 01:21 AM
...cravings out the bumhole....
It's clear that your way of smoking cigarettes was unorthodox in the extreme... this may have contributed to your difficulty in quitting.

:lol:

SneezeSnout
10-18-15, 01:40 AM
Thank you TangledWebs :D

Yes I didn't experience any severe withdrawal symptoms that usually accompany abruptly abstaining from smoking. I did gain weight but I also changed medication at the same time. The worst part so far has been the feeling like I have nothing to do as I used to use smoking as a way to pass the time or meet new people.

What was most effective for you to stay away from smoking? I read that you used a variety of methods in quitting. Is there any advice you would like to give me for staying on the wagon?

Thanks again:)

TangledWebs
10-18-15, 06:02 AM
It's clear that your way of smoking cigarettes was unorthodox in the extreme... this may have contributed to your difficulty in quitting.

:lol:

Haha! Very funny, dvdnvwls! :giggle:

TangledWebs
10-18-15, 06:19 AM
The worst part so far has been the feeling like I have nothing to do as I used to use smoking as a way to pass the time or meet new people.

What was most effective for you to stay away from smoking? I read that you used a variety of methods in quitting. Is there any advice you would like to give me for staying on the wagon?

I used to smoke as a way to pass the time, too. Not being able to take cigarette breaks anymore was really rough.

Once the initial withdrawal symptoms and cravings subsided, I would say staying on the wagon was fairly easy. Avoid being around people who are smoking though. For me, the smell of smoke definitely triggered my cravings. I figured out I needed to keep my distance after I fell off the wagon a few times. :rolleyes:

Fuzzy12
10-18-15, 06:58 AM
Ive just quit too. It's been about two months now. For me it didn't happen that smoothly though. The withdrawal symptoms were rough. I was so restless and tensed all the time, couldn't focus even for 2 min, my mood took a dive, etc. I hated every minute of it. I didnt do any work in august, and most of July and September.

. What I missed the most were the breaks as well. They gave me structure and opportunity to socialise.

Then I started going for walks everytime I felt restless and started doing a lot of other exercise too. Swimming, playing games, etc. That really helped. What helped the most was probably the e cigarette. I vaped for a week or too and though initially I didn't like it at all it did help with the withdrawal symptoms/ beneficial effects of smoking.

Throughout this time I complained ranted and vented on here, non stop. That helped too. ;)

And then i went on a super relaxing super fun holiday for a week and that's when I finally stopped thinking about, craving and missing smoking 24/7. I stopped vaping and gum as well after that.

I still miss it. Just not all the time. The best is that I don't stink anymore all the time.

Congrats @90 days. Well done!!!

Delphine
10-18-15, 04:52 PM
Well done you! 3 months is impressive!! :)

I stopped 6 weeks ago, after a few attempts this Summer that lasted 3 days max!

I'd been off them 20+ year but relapsed 5 years ago after much major trauma, and often chain smoked. (Oddly enough, they got me through.... but now it's time to quit.)

What really helped was the lovely idea of perhaps being free - instead of the dreary feeling of 'quitting=being deprived'!

Because I'd had a few failed attempts, I got nicotine patches and found a vape that suits me. That helps a lot; no physical withdrawal symptoms this time.

Helped that I had 20+ years of memories of being a non-smoker. They genuinely never crossed my mind.

I do get the odd longing for what seems like my comforting old friend, but I know for sure that ciggies are no friend to me!

When I get that longing, I remind myself again of how lovely it is and will be to finally be free of the need to smoke.

Free of over-washing my clothes and hair just to stay fresh.

Free of having to go outside in the cold or rain.

Free of going to the shop for ciggies and coming home with a bag of stuff I probably didn't need.

Free to hug a friend without worrying I might stink.

Free to board a flight of any length without missing them.

Vaping and patches were very necessary for me this time. And apparently nicotine itself isn't any worse than caffeine. I've read that in low doses it's a stimulant and helps with focus, and in higher doses its a sedative (not sure how reliable those google searches are.)

In time I'll decide whether or not to quit nicotine itself. For now it's enough not to be drawing all that tar and other yukky poisons into my lungs! (Obviously, if I had a magic wand I'd wave it and be completely free.)

Booked a sun holiday for next month with the savings too....!

Am well impressed with all of you though. An inspirational team, lighting the path ahead of me! Thanks :)

sarahsweets
10-20-15, 09:34 AM
Good for you. Its like my last demon. I got sober about 3 years ago, but I am just so scared that if I quit Ill drink again. I have zero desire for alcohol and am very active in my 12 step program but smoking is my last dirty nasty loser addiction.

Unmanagable
10-20-15, 04:21 PM
Congrats on kicking it, and so smoothly, too!

I was a beast for at least the first two-ish months when I finally quit cold turkey 8 years ago, after smoking 20+ years, and after many previous failed attempts with patches, gums, etc..

I was so on edge, I even snatched up a former (adult) student by his shirt collar when he rudely blew smoke in my face to taunt me after learning I was trying to quit. That was my only physical contact incident, though.

I used my speed bag at home to release my frustrations the rest of the time. I even bought a combo heavy bag/speed bag for my office at work and incorporated it into programming opportunities with the clients.

Celery sticks, carrot sticks, grapes, berries, straws, stress balls, pens, pencils, water, and more water are all things I liked keeping handy to keep my mouth and hands occupied. Coloring books (got a cool mandala one), connect the dot books (have loved them since I was a kid), and various percussion instruments were helpful, too. Keep the mind happily occupied while replacing that addiction with healthier choices. Sounds easy enough, right? lol

I thought giving up cigs was the hardest thing I'd ever conquered until I recently switched to plant based, mucus free, and mucus lean eating as a result of a gall bladder scare. Trying to eat and maintain the level of healthiness we were created to thrive on, after being raised on and mainly choosing dead "convenient" foods my whole life, has surpassed the cigs by far for being the most difficult.

Wishing you continued success!

Powderbucket
10-22-15, 05:30 AM
Well done on your quitting success! :)

I smoked for 2 years and stopped when I went on Concerta. I kinda feel like it put me off smoking for some reason. I do smoke hookah / hubbly /shisha from time to time, but I rarely crave it. I think that medications that raise your Dopamine will stop you from wanting to smoke because smoking raises Dopamine for you :P

Abcdef
10-24-15, 09:46 PM
Congrats on giving up.

Smoking is a mental addiction, not a physical one...for most anyway.

Like you mentioned, you have avoided situations where you were most likely to smoke. This is not a long-term solution however. You need to put yourself in these situations and create new memories when you are not smoking, this will take a lot of will power.

You need to get rid of the smoking memories and replace them with non-smoking memories.

I am slowly but surely ticking off my smoking memories but not at the end of the road.

Good luck and hopefully this makes sense.

Fuzzy12
10-28-15, 03:13 PM
Abcdef, as far as I know, nicotine is highly physically addictive.

B]Congrats on giving up.

Smoking is a mental addiction, not a physical one...for most anyway.

Like you mentioned, you have avoided situations where you were most likely to smoke. This is not a long-term solution however. You need to put yourself in these situations and create new memories when you are not smoking, this will take a lot of will power.

You need to get rid of the smoking memories and replace them with non-smoking memories.

I am slowly but surely ticking off my smoking memories but not at the end of the road.

Good luck and hopefully this makes sense.

aeon
10-28-15, 06:49 PM
In my late 30s, I was a smoker for 9 months. (stop snickering)

I started because they would wake me up and give me this clarity of mind when I was working 3rd shift.
They took away the fade and fog, and made mind-bending tasks on the computer easier.

I only smoked at work, so I was a 1 pack a week smoker. Camel unfiltereds...hmm. :p

I know, I know...I am a total lightweight! :o

But this all was a clue to my doctor about my at-that-point undiagnosed ADHD.

Eventually the cognitive dissonance of thinking about how I was doing something that was hurting me
was too much, and so I stopped.

Never had a craving or anything. Well, not right away. ;)

Five years later I was at work (new job) and one fall day I saw someone through the window as they lit up
and took a drag.

It was when I saw the red-hot “cherry” at the end of the cigarette, I had the weirdest feeling. All of a sudden,
out of nowhere, I was craving and wanting a cigarette so bad I was thinking of leaving work to buy a pack. :eek:

My concentration was completely destroyed by how all-consuming this feeling was. It was like my brain was
lying in wait to sneak attack when it got the right signal. It was more than just a thought, it was like something
changed in my body, it was that strong a craving.

I gained a new respect for the addictive potential of nicotine that day. And I didn’t go buy a pack, thankfully. :doh:

Fast forward to today...even though I know there is no good reason, and many reasons not to, I think about vaping.
Not so much I have done anything, but I do wonder about it from time to time. :scratch:

And sometimes I do think about how good (at the time) those unfiltered Camels tasted.

Times change, but sometimes once-activated brain circuitry still calls my name. :eyebrow:


Cheers,
Ian

Little Missy
10-28-15, 09:38 PM
:lol: