View Full Version : Do I belong here?


rbui5000
10-23-15, 10:20 PM
Hello, recently I talked to my doctor about problems I've been having with my attention span towards school and people, insomnia, anxiety, and constant daydreaming. Before this, I came out to be inconclusive on an ADHD test I took when I was 10, however my doctor has told me she believes I have inattentive ADD. I'm 16 now and my doctor has prescribed me on Ritalin. When I came home with the bottle, my mom was mad at me because she has a very large negative view on drugs in general.

I feel really indecisive now, I want to know if I truly have inattentive ADD or not, I looked up the symptoms and I match most of them (besides being disorganized to a degree), but I don't want to think I'm abusing this drug or faking a disease. A large part of me tells me that I really do have it, since I match and relate to a lot of symptoms I read online, but I don't know for sure, and I want to see if I can relate to the people on this board. What are the average lives for all of you with inattentive ADD? What struggles do you normally face?

Socaljaxs
10-24-15, 12:59 AM
I'm confused, so a doctor perscribed you medication a stimulant medication.... your mom wasn't present or there for any of this or spoken to in regards to test for a formal diagnosis? What do you mean the test was inconclusive? Did you get a formal diagnosis from the prescribing doctor? Also, maybe I'm wrong here but being a minor in the US how were you able to obtain not only the prescription but the medication or even a diagnosis without a parent? I thought a parent for minors needs to be aware and approve schedule 2 medications for minors.

sarahsweets
10-24-15, 05:58 AM
Socal just asked all the questions I was thinking.

Nala94
10-26-15, 09:40 AM
I was in a very similar position to you. I was tested at 10 as well and the testing was inconclusive. I am now 21 and in my senior year of college. I just got tested about a month ago and was diagnosed with inattentive ADD. So despite multiple people being unsure whether it was worth it for me to get tested again, I decided to go ahead with it just for the piece of mind. I was tiered of wondering, and it worked out for me.

This is just me, everyone is different, but if you are wondering than you are probably struggling with something even if it is not ADD. Testing can be expensive though too so it really depends on your situation. Some insurance will cover at least part of it.

As far as the doctor prescribing stimulants without a diagnosis, some will. I had a psychiatrist prescribe stratterra and then said if that didn't work I could try stimulants. It seemed sketchy to me though so I went to someone else. It does seem weird that you were able to get it as a minor though without parental consent.

sarahsweets
10-26-15, 12:48 PM
This is just me, everyone is different, but if you are wondering than you are probably struggling with something even if it is not ADD. Testing can be expensive though too so it really depends on your situation. Some insurance will cover at least part of it.

What kind of testing are you talking about that was so expensive? There are NO tests for adhd-it sounds like you got duped.

vampares
10-31-15, 06:49 PM
Ah man that's awful. I have had to face a lot of negativity regarding medication. It seems like people don't want to believe something is wrong with you. It may help to describe what your problems are and how the medication helps. This helps prevent others from blaming your ADD symptoms on your medication! I know it sounds outrageous but they will think the medication is causing the ADD. This includes some "Doctors" and psychologists.

You should be confident in what you are taking. Feel good about it. Otherwise this guilt or secrecy will have a negative effect on your life.

vampares
10-31-15, 06:58 PM
What kind of testing are you talking about that was so expensive? There are NO tests for adhd-it sounds like you got duped.

It's like the never-rarely-sometimes-often-always test for depression. Only it doesn't cover the past 2 weeks, 6 months and today. It mostly about the last ten minutes. If you fall out of your chair you have ADD.

TheChemicals
10-31-15, 07:43 PM
Stay a while and if this place grows on you then you definately have add

Delphine
10-31-15, 08:00 PM
rbui5000, perhaps your mom was scared? If she has a negative view of meds, maybe she needs time to adjust. Parents are not perfect people, as I'm sure you've already realised, at 16.

You sound a little scared too... you're worrying about lifespan. People with ADD live long and happy lives with the correct care, structure and support in place.
(ie.... once they don't go :) extreme-thrill-seeking- bungee-jumping-without-a-rope kind of thing... or self-medicating on heavy street drugs :()

I'm 'inattentive ADD' - 56 and counting - healthy and well - but easily procrastinate, can be disorganised, often 10 mins late, scattered, day-dreamy, somewhat forgetful...etc.

But I've loved life so far. The only thorn in my side has been being really hard on myself for being like this (I didn't even know about my ADD until recently.)

In time, I hope your mum will relax and talk to you about this and meet your feelings and worries.

Maybe for a little while, allow her a little time and space to deal with her own feelings?

In the meantime, stay in touch with your doc and give feedback on how you are doing on your meds?

This a is great forum. I'm glad you found it :) Keep posting.

burger
10-31-15, 10:21 PM
Indecisiveness/procrastination seems to be part of ADD I think. At least I do it. I wouldn't worry about what your Mother thinks. It's your life at stake not hers. You can probably try the drugs and see what effect you get. There's a chance it won't be the right drug for you. If you go off to College, etc... and have ADD then you will probably have to take meds. Meds may have negative effects which vary from person to person and as I said you may have to try a different drug if ritalin doesn't work. I think my parents screwed me over when I was younger by not telling me things and not putting me on medication suggested by a psychiatrist. ADD will effect your entire life quite often in negative ways ranging from relationships, work, school, friends, finances, etc.... However some people really hate or have bad experiences with medication.

Abcdef
10-31-15, 11:22 PM
As burger mentioned don't worry too much about what your mother said, she would never really understand unless you switched places!

When I first read the adhd symptoms online it was like reading my life story in bullet points! However, if you find you match most of these typical symptoms and feel that they are holding you back in life don't be scared to try meds.

You are still young and have time to approach things on a trial and error basis without it affecting life later on-where it really matters.

Use this to your advantage.

Shelsi
11-01-15, 09:04 AM
What kind of testing are you talking about that was so expensive? There are NO tests for adhd-it sounds like you got duped.

My college requires testing for ADHD before they'll allow accomodations or take over prescribing meds. 2 years ago I was diagnosed by a psychologist but since it didn't involve all the testing they wouldn't accept it. So I had to go to a neuropsychiatrist - they did IQ tests and a bunch of other stuff. My insurance covered it so it was just a copay for me but I noticed they charged my insurance $1600.

Not saying these are good tests for ADHD just saying what a Big 10 university in the US requires.

pixie cut
11-01-15, 08:59 PM
Hi. Welcome to the forum. Good for you reaching out and asking questions.
I'm old enough to be your gramma, and I just found out a couple years ago I have ADD. I am taking Concerta and seeing a psychiatrist, and life is good.
I'd just like to say a couple things to encourage you.
At 10, ADD was a maybe in your life. Was your Mom aware of that? And now here it is again. And she's angry. Maybe angry at herself a bit.This time your doc has decided that ADD isn't inconclusive anymore, it's time for treatment. You can talk with your doctor about how she made that decision.
I guess all I want to say, is that I wish your mom was giving you support. At 16 it would be great to have. If she's not, I hope you have someone you trust who can support you. School counselor maybe?You have made a brave decision informing your Mom that you have medication, when you know that she is generally not too positive about meds. You could have kept it a big secret, but you didn't. You sound like a very open hearted person. Maybe you could suggest that the two of you go in to the doc together, or that the doc provide some literature for your mom to read. Explain to your doc the situation if you haven't already. Your mom needs facts to calm her fears. Be strong. I wish you all the best. Public libraries have lots of good books about ADD.

Toss4n
11-03-15, 05:58 AM
What kind of testing are you talking about that was so expensive? There are NO tests for adhd-it sounds like you got duped.

There are neuropsychological tests for ADHD that are required in some countries in order to get a diagnosis (these can easily be faked though source (http://healthland.time.com/2011/04/28/faking-it-why-nearly-1-in-4-adults-who-seek-treatment-dont-have-adhd/)). Functional MRI scans could also be considered tests that can help diagnose ADHD source (http://healthland.time.com/2013/07/16/reading-the-brain-fda-approves-first-scan-for-diagnosing-adhd/).

sarahsweets
11-03-15, 04:35 PM
nearly a quarter of adults who seek treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may be exaggerating or faking their symptoms.
I would like to see the sources behind this study. I would like to see how peer reviewed their results were and what their clinical control groups were like
The author Meredith Melchik is nothing more than a blogger/op/ed/health writer for Time magazine with no medical credentials associated what she is talking about.
The authors of the study, published in The Clinical Neuropsychologist,
This publication is relatively narrow if this was actually some groundbreaking earth shattering study. Something along the lines of The Lancet, Journal of Medicine or heck, even psychiatry today would make me take note.

An adhd diagnosis should involve a thorough patient history with as much info and records as possible from childhood to establish a time line. That would be school records, teacher reports etc. Also another person close to the potential adhd'r should take one of the surveys like the Conners scale to report how they see this person and their level of functioning so either a partner,parent,sibling or BFF.
All of the other tests are helpful for diagnosing other conditions or ruling other stuff out but they should not be used as a diagnostic tool for adhd.

Toss4n
11-05-15, 06:52 AM
I would like to see the sources behind this study. I would like to see how peer reviewed their results were and what their clinical control groups were like
The author Meredith Melchik is nothing more than a blogger/op/ed/health writer for Time magazine with no medical credentials associated what she is talking about.

This publication is relatively narrow if this was actually some groundbreaking earth shattering study. Something along the lines of The Lancet, Journal of Medicine or heck, even psychiatry today would make me take note.

An adhd diagnosis should involve a thorough patient history with as much info and records as possible from childhood to establish a time line. That would be school records, teacher reports etc. Also another person close to the potential adhd'r should take one of the surveys like the Conners scale to report how they see this person and their level of functioning so either a partner,parent,sibling or BFF.
All of the other tests are helpful for diagnosing other conditions or ruling other stuff out but they should not be used as a diagnostic tool for adhd.

I'm guessing it's just an estimate based on pure speculation (how would they actually measure it?). In that study they just basically sent in people with ADHD and without, and basically just tracked how many of the fakers were give a diagnosis. I think this (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0887617707000960) is the actual study. I definitely don't disagree with you, but without any fool-proof ways of diagnosing it, there are bound to be a lot of fakers trying to get the diagnosis just to score some meds. :eyebrow:

Nala94
11-08-15, 10:23 PM
What kind of testing are you talking about that was so expensive? There are NO tests for adhd-it sounds like you got duped.

At the college level (or at least where I am) they require a neuro-psych eval to prescribe stimulants or for accommodations. I guess I just kind of assumed that was the way it was everywhere.