View Full Version : Boring Group Work and Meetings


addude94
11-14-15, 12:09 AM
I'm working on a big project at university, in a group of 6. The other 5 in my group love meeting up to work, during the day, well in advance of deadlines :confused::confused:

I've been trying my best to fit in with their way of doing things, but they've still been complaining that I'm late to meetings and don't get anything done (which I actually do, just not in their presence). I'm working at least three times harder this year than the last and it's still not good enough, apparently.

I prefer working on my own parts of the project at home and during my own time. I don't know how my group manages to get stuff done with everyone talking so much and distracting each other.

Anyway, they've been getting really annoying. At one point, I couldn't hold it in anymore and yelled really loudly at one of my group members about his nagging, which immediately silenced the entire room - I'm usually the quiet one :lol:. I stepped back a little and skipped a couple of meetings (I still did the work from home). A few days later and I rejoined their petty meetings to find they've all started it again.

Only one person in the group knows about my ADD and he complains the most (the one I shouted at) :umm1:. This is really frustrating. I hate coursework as it is - I'm much more of an exams person. Has anyone got any advice?

addude94
11-14-15, 12:10 AM
I should really be sleeping - it's 04:10 lol

dvdnvwls
11-14-15, 02:32 AM
My main advice: Group projects are evil. :)

My secondary advice: Do what you can to "fit in". This project won't last forever - in fact it will be over soon. Save your efforts toward being respected and valued for a situation where those efforts will count long-term.

Fuzzy12
11-14-15, 07:05 AM
The only way to.silence them is by proving to them that you are pulling your weight.

Keep notes and record all the things you do at home and show them at your meetings. If you can show them finished pieces of work even better.

Do attend the meetings and be punctual even if you don't get anything done on them. In my experience not attending the meetings or being late goes down very badly and the academic, your prof or lecturer, might also see that as something very negative.

Have you told them that you find them talking distracting?

Do try and be diplomatic and don't **** them.off. I'm not sure which year you are in but you don't want to get a reputation for being difficult to work with. I used to prefer exams to group work as well but it seems like these days almost every module is at least partially assessed on group work.

Best of luck!!

addude94
11-14-15, 07:47 AM
The only way to.silence them is by proving to them that you are pulling your weight.

Keep notes and record all the things you do at home and show them at your meetings. If you can show them finished pieces of work even better.

Do attend the meetings and be punctual even if you don't get anything done on them. In my experience not attending the meetings or being late goes down very badly and the academic, your prof or lecturer, might also see that as something very negative.

Have you told them that you find them talking distracting?

Do try and be diplomatic and don't **** them.off. I'm not sure which year you are in but you don't want to get a reputation for being difficult to work with. I used to prefer exams to group work as well but it seems like these days almost every module is at least partially assessed on group work.

Best of luck!!


Thanks for the tips!

I do keep a record of everything I do and they have 24/7 access to my work since I work from within a shared Dropbox folder. It seems that they want me to be working while they are, which I try my best to do but really struggle with. What's most annoying is that I've actually contributed the most work - I contributed to 28% of the marks so far, which should ideally be 17%.

I attend most meetings, even though they are such a waste of time, just to keep my group somewhat satisfied. Naturally, I'm just not very punctual - I don't think there's anyone in my course who doesn't know it. My group still seems to take it personally, though.

I have told my group that I find it distracting to work amongst others and that I work best on my own, but they insist that I need to be there working with them (which I don't get since we split the work up into our individual parts).

I only yelled at him by accident; other than that, I've been holding it all in and have been trying to be nice to them all - there's a peer-review involved, so I kind of have to. If anything, it's just my way of working that annoys them, not really the way I work with them. I can't help but think that my group is the problem - they should be more understanding.

Some of them have stooped as low as talking about me to my own close friends behind my back. I was really shocked to hear about it. I can't believe they're even worse than they've come across to be. I'm in my third year of a 4-year integrated master's course, but I can switch to the 3-year bachelor's course if I want. I don't think there is much more group work, but I can't wait for this all to be over.

I guess I'm just stuck in a deep pit with my group until this all ends :(

addude94
11-14-15, 07:48 AM
My main advice: Group projects are evil. :)

My secondary advice: Do what you can to "fit in". This project won't last forever - in fact it will be over soon. Save your efforts toward being respected and valued for a situation where those efforts will count long-term.

Really really evil

Fuzzy12
11-14-15, 10:52 AM
Sounds like you found a sucky group. :(

It's great that they can see your finished work in Dropbox but do say it explicitly. Maybe at yhe beginning or ehd if each meeting you should discuss your progress, tra k how nuch each person has done and how much the project as a whole has progressed. Have you out in writing your project goals and what exactly each member's job is and little deadlines for sub jobs?. If not, I'd highly recommend that. It's the best way to show what you've done and how much is left to do (and to prove to them that you are doing your bit). I'd also recommend taking minutes at every meeting so everything is down in writing.

Consider talking to the module convenor. Even if they don't interfere it will be good to have presented your side of the story first..

The peer review mark counts for just a small fraction of the total mark isn't it or does it decide how the total mark gets distributed? I forgot..

Either way: little tip..when you are writing your peer review write it completely objectively and professional even if the temptation to rant about your project mates is strong. You can criticise and explain but do it extremely professionally or it will backfire.

addude94
11-14-15, 11:17 AM
Sounds like you found a sucky group. :(

It's great that they can see your finished work in Dropbox but do say it explicitly. Maybe at yhe beginning or ehd if each meeting you should discuss your progress, tra k how nuch each person has done and how much the project as a whole has progressed. Have you out in writing your project goals and what exactly each member's job is and little deadlines for sub jobs?. If not, I'd highly recommend that. It's the best way to show what you've done and how much is left to do (and to prove to them that you are doing your bit). I'd also recommend taking minutes at every meeting so everything is down in writing.

Consider talking to the module convenor. Even if they don't interfere it will be good to have presented your side of the story first..

The peer review mark counts for just a small fraction of the total mark isn't it or does it decide how the total mark gets distributed? I forgot..

Either way: little tip..when you are writing your peer review write it completely objectively and professional even if the temptation to rant about your project mates is strong. You can criticise and explain but do it extremely professionally or it will backfire.

Thanks for the tips - yeah, I definitely should start doing that.
I'll speak to the module convenor too - I hadn't thought of that.
The peer review accounts for a small percentage; I will try to avoid the temptation to rant :)
Thanks again :thankyou: