View Full Version : What does a fully developed brain feel like?


BellaVita
11-14-15, 11:46 PM
I'm very curious about this topic.

I was thinking about my brain from a few years ago, even a year ago, and I feel like I am "growing" and developing all the time - in fact I hardly feel like the same person I was a year ago.

These past few years I have learned a lot, around late 2012 was when I began a "growth spurt of mental development" that is still happening in 2015, although I think the biggest growth spurt has completed. I began having an easier time with speech and articulating my thoughts, especially in written form. It felt like my brain was (not literal) growing in leaps and bounds, that I was learning better ways to take in information, learning words at a fast pace, developing my personality and learning what it means to express it, and for the first time ever, really having my own original thoughts and ideas that I could *grasp* before they left my brain, and being able to translate those thoughts into words. (I did have my own thoughts and ideas before that, but they always seemed hard to grasp, and I had great trouble in writing and in speech explaining those thoughts, in fact I was often unaware of what those thoughts even were)

It felt very similar (although definitely wasn't to the same extent) of how I imagine it is for a toddler learning to talk.

I still can *feel* my brain growing and developing, and feel maturity setting in in different parts of the brain that I feel wasn't present before.

Sort of like my thoughts becoming "defined."

Anyway, if you read through that (or not), I have some questions to ask, some things I would like to explore.

How do you feel now mentally compared to when you were in your late teens/early 20s?

Do you feel the same, different?

At what age did you feel like your brain was "developed" - or do you still feel like it is changing and growing all the time? Still making connections?

I have a feeling there will be certain factors that influence results, whether there was trauma/abuse in childhood, whether one has autism/developmental delays, there is even the "30 percent rule" I've heard about with ADHD - I know all of these things can affect the whole process, although I'm not sure in which ways exactly, so this makes the whole question even more interesting.

I have heard the brain is fully developed at around age 25, but I do not know how true that is, or what it exactly means, and if this is true for all neurotypes.

So, what better place to explore the topic than here. :)

Pilgrim
11-15-15, 12:03 AM
I would exactly agree the brain develops around 25, wish I'd known about ADD then. Lucky I use to do a lot of aerobic activity. Probably jogged 30 kms a week. Competitive basketball player.
The brain never stops developing although it does slow down. Untreated ADD or depression really puts the breaks on any development.
A supportive environment and friends helps heaps as well. I have 3 dogs and although I was a little bit reluctant at first they give a lot of emotional nourishment.
I do not feel any different but the rate at which I learn has changed just takes more time.

Talking about the 30% rule without meds i would still definitely be that far behind. Meds just make you that more mature. Maybe cause the brain works better in concert together.

Abuse never helps and the problems arising from it continue if treatment is available for it I would continue with it.
Goodluck

Abi
11-15-15, 01:07 AM
20.

With the ADHD 70% rule, we have 20 / 0.7 = 29

With the bipolar (suggested) 50% rule we have 20 / 0.5 = 40

Roundmouth
11-15-15, 02:32 PM
I've always felt like I'm mentally some 2/3 of my physical age. Would explain why I couldn't learn to drive when others did - I was like 12 years old then.

BellaVita
11-15-15, 11:16 PM
20.

With the ADHD 70% rule, we have 20 / 0.7 = 29

With the bipolar (suggested) 50% rule we have 20 / 0.5 = 40

You felt like your brain was fully developed at 20?

Lucky. :p

BellaVita
11-15-15, 11:17 PM
Hmm....it is interesting that not many people have commented, perhaps most on this forum don't feel their brain is fully developed?

Maybe my question was too difficult?

Or perhaps just nerdy and boring.

I'm still very interested to hear about others brain development.

dvdnvwls
11-15-15, 11:37 PM
Maybe Abi is saying he feels permanently 20. I don't know.

BellaVita
11-15-15, 11:46 PM
Maybe Abi is saying he feels permanently 20. I don't know.

Hey now that you're here....

Answer the questions? :p

sarahsweets
11-16-15, 05:26 PM
squishy and moist. ;)

Lunacie
11-16-15, 05:36 PM
squishy and moist. ;)

That fits in with my brother telling me as a child that my head was filled with sawdust. ;)

Abi
11-16-15, 05:51 PM
I meant that I think the NT brain is more or less fully developed at 20.

TangledWebs
11-16-15, 06:49 PM
How do you feel now mentally compared to when you were in your late teens/early 20s? Do you feel the same, or different?

By my late teens/early 20s, I remember feeling as if I had finally caught up with my peers. Ironically, I was in advanced reading and mathematics in elementary school. According to my elementary school teachers, I was an absentminded daydreamer, but I was intelligent, which supposedly made up for my space cadet-ness. In middle school and for the first couple years of high school, I really struggled academically. Ultimately, I "fell through the cracks." I didn't have the mental faculties required to comprehend the increasingly difficult material in middle school and most of high school. I was lost. During my senior year of high school, I was able to turn everything around. I wasn't diagnosed or medicated yet, but I did have an easier time learning new information.

At what age did you feel like your brain was "developed" - still feel like it is changing and growing all the time? Still making connections?

My cognitive development plateaued at around age 25. I'm emotionally immature though. :p

BellaVita
11-16-15, 07:54 PM
By my late teens/early 20s, I remember feeling as if I had finally caught up with my peers. Ironically, I was in advanced reading and mathematics in elementary school. According to my elementary school teachers, I was an absentminded daydreamer, but I was intelligent, which supposedly made up for my space cadet-ness. In middle school and for the first couple years of high school, I really struggled academically. Ultimately, I "fell through the cracks." I didn't have the mental faculties required to comprehend the increasingly difficult material in middle school and most of high school. I was lost. During my senior year of high school, I was able to turn everything around. I wasn't diagnosed or medicated yet, but I did have an easier time learning new information.



My cognitive development plateaued at around age 25. I'm emotionally immature though. :p

This was just what I was looking for!

Thanks for taking the time to respond. :)

Delphine
11-16-15, 09:33 PM
I'm very curious about this topic.
.........
How do you feel now mentally compared to when you were in your late teens/early 20s?

Do you feel the same, different?

At what age did you feel like your brain was "developed" - or do you still feel like it is changing and growing all the time? Still making connections?

......


For me, school and college felt like..... "what information and feedback do you need from me?"... well, okay - here you go. I can meet those requirements in some shape or form.

In one way, back then, having a shape and form - a kind of 'map' or plan imposed by teachers/instructors made life fairly straightforward.
(My difficulties were in meeting those requirements in a timely fashion, but hey... anxiety helped...'fear of disappointing' said teachers/instructors. :)
It all got done... and I was one of those people for whom deadlines/ exams/ final dates helped me focus - (even if with a lot of anxiety.)

Then there came a time of me thinking.. 'hang on a minute.... so, if I keep on achieving/performing..... that means I have to keep on performing?
- I looked around at those under-achievers that seemed so loved, and thought to myself, 'well they have it sweet...'

So I began to look at what life might look like if I didn't keep meeting requirements, and started feeling what life might be like without all this anxiety to meet requirements! (Age late teens/early 20's.)

Still not full 'brain development' according to your original question, but an interesting left-turn for me...... and probably developing different brain areas?

What followed were many years of 'doing it my way'..... much to the dismay of parents who'd hoped for better things from me.

Far less anxiety for me, and much disappointed resignation from them!

Developed more creative areas of the brain over next 20 years, and also much self-awareness and emotional brain development.

Late 30's, I asked my father (40 yrs older than me) "At what age are you supposed to feel "grown up"?? (cos that wasn't happening for me) - his reply was "if you ever find out the answer to that question, please come back and tell me!!" :)

Not until mid 50's did I realise that I had this ADHD factor going on. Which has re-referenced my take on 'brain-development'...maturity... feeling 'grown up'....

Still figuring that part out.... so maybe I'll come back sometime and let you know too, Bellavita :)

BellaVita
11-16-15, 11:00 PM
For me, school and college felt like..... "what information and feedback do you need from me?"... well, okay - here you go. I can meet those requirements in some shape or form.

In one way, back then, having a shape and form - a kind of 'map' or plan imposed by teachers/instructors made life fairly straightforward.
(My difficulties were in meeting those requirements in a timely fashion, but hey... anxiety helped...'fear of disappointing' said teachers/instructors. :)
It all got done... and I was one of those people for whom deadlines/ exams/ final dates helped me focus - (even if with a lot of anxiety.)

Then there came a time of me thinking.. 'hang on a minute.... so, if I keep on achieving/performing..... that means I have to keep on performing?
- I looked around at those under-achievers that seemed so loved, and thought to myself, 'well they have it sweet...'

So I began to look at what life might look like if I didn't keep meeting requirements, and started feeling what life might be like without all this anxiety to meet requirements! (Age late teens/early 20's.)

Still not full 'brain development' according to your original question, but an interesting left-turn for me...... and probably developing different brain areas?

What followed were many years of 'doing it my way'..... much to the dismay of parents who'd hoped for better things from me.

Far less anxiety for me, and much disappointed resignation from them!

Developed more creative areas of the brain over next 20 years, and also much self-awareness and emotional brain development.

Late 30's, I asked my father (40 yrs older than me) "At what age are you supposed to feel "grown up"?? (cos that wasn't happening for me) - his reply was "if you ever find out the answer to that question, please come back and tell me!!" :)

Not until mid 50's did I realise that I had this ADHD factor going on. Which has re-referenced my take on 'brain-development'...maturity... feeling 'grown up'....

Still figuring that part out.... so maybe I'll come back sometime and let you know too, Bellavita :)

Thank you for such a thorough answer!

I am glad that you learned to "do things your way" - it really does lessen anxiety doesn't it?

Haha, that is funny about asking your father about feeling "grown up." :)

sarek
11-17-15, 03:24 AM
I think the human brain, and even more so a brain with ADD, never ceases developing. In fact, if it stops changing, then I would start to be worried.

Roundmouth
11-17-15, 09:31 AM
In my thirties I made a decission to try and close my mind a bit after taking in everything that came in my way. The ambition was to make something useful of some of the things I'd picked up so far. Not sure if it was the right thing to do.

Little Missy
11-17-15, 10:15 AM
I think the human brain, and even more so a brain with ADD, never ceases developing. In fact, if it stops changing, then I would start to be worried.

Oh for sure! The knowledge that lies before us is infinite!

Lunacie
11-17-15, 10:58 AM
I think the human brain, and even more so a brain with ADD, never ceases developing. In fact, if it stops changing, then I would start to be worried.

From what I've read, even though the brain may be fully developed by 25 (or later), the brain can still change.

Input like our experiences and the environment can cause changes through neuroplasticity.

stef
11-17-15, 12:49 PM
I never thought about it much objectively or from a distance but im sure my brain developed " differently", from overcomprnsating my short term memory problems and possible dyslexia. Plus the synesthstesia....

Actually i cant use my own unorthodox thought processes to imagine a more " normal" brain, in the first place!

Stevuke79
11-17-15, 02:04 PM
I definitely at age 26, felt more "caught up" than I did at age 16.

I read something from barkley (I may be misttating it) where it said that the brain is developing until about age 25.. and if you have ADHD, and "lack of development" is probably permanent.

That being said, at age 36, I can still see ways in which I feel more "caught up" than I did at 26,.. or even 30.

It feels like it has to do with "brain development" .. but what do I know, this isn't my subject. Maybe we do develop after age 25.. similar to how people learn to crawl or talk around age 1 or so.. but people who have a brain injury at age 40, for example, can still relearn to walk or talk, it's just much harder. (If that were bad logic, I wouldn't even know.)