View Full Version : How to Quit smoking with ADD


-brian-
11-16-15, 02:12 AM
My Current Roommate is going to be gone on and off for a while and when he gets back i cant be smoking in the apartment (rehab requires he quits). I have avoided quitting thus far but figured now is better than never, its either the cold roof or the cold quits.

Any tips on how to quit without going crazy or maybe how i can avoid lashing at everyone within a 1000 foot perimeter. Im not on anything to help with my ADD (not yet at least) so im trying to find a healthy way to do this. if anyone has any experiences quitting while id love to hear as ive already begun and my i have to go stay with family for a week very soon :eek:

Fuzzy12
11-16-15, 05:12 AM
I quit this summer. I think two things helped me the most:

1. E-cigarette (the vaping kind): I did that for about two weeks before quitting completely. It has the same effect as smoking in terms of nicotine but it's not as enjoyable as smoking a proper cigarette so I wasnt tempted to do it all the time (at least initially so if you want to quit nicotine for good make sure you don't stay on the ecig for too long).

2. Exercise: every time I felt restless I went for a walk. Initially I'd even take my tea cup with me just as if I was going for a smoking break (don't go anywhere though where you are likely to encounter lots of people smoking). More vigorous exercise helped a bit with the mood swings, especially if you do something that's also fun like playing games.

Also, if you can, be kind to yourself and don't expect too much from yourself for a few weeks. Maybe that was just me but my brain went pretty much to mush. It does get better again!! What might also help is to start some sort of new hobby, something that isnt too challenging cognitively but that is fun and keeps you busy.

-brian-
11-16-15, 05:19 AM
I quit this summer. I think two things helped me the most:

1. E-cigarette (the vaping kind): I did that for about two weeks before quitting completely. It has the same effect as smoking in terms of nicotine but it's not as enjoyable as smoking a proper cigarette so I wasnt tempted to do it all the time (at least initially so if you want to quit nicotine for good make sure you don't stay on the ecig for too long).

2. Exercise: every time I felt restless I went for a walk. Initially I'd even take my tea cup with me just as if I was going for a smoking break (don't go anywhere though where you are likely to encounter lots of people smoking). More vigorous exercise helped a bit with the mood swings, especially if you do something that's also fun like playing games.

Also, if you can, be kind to yourself and don't expect too much from yourself for a few weeks. Maybe that was just me but my brain went pretty much to mush. It does get better again!! What might also help is to start some sort of new hobby, something that isnt too challenging cognitively but that is fun and keeps you busy.

My roommate had a bunch of vape liquids couple hundred dollars worth assuming he did not throw it away he might let me use it. good suggestion :)

Fuzzy12
11-16-15, 05:36 AM
If you have questions Salleh is the resident expert on vaping. There are also lots of threads on quitting smoking and nicotine replacement in the addiction section I think.

-brian-
11-16-15, 05:47 AM
If you have questions Salleh is the resident expert on vaping. There are also lots of threads on quitting smoking and nicotine replacement in the addiction section I think.

This forum is like a repository of life knowledge for people like me :D . if i have any questions i won't hesitate to ask. thanks again

Delphine
11-16-15, 09:55 AM
I quit at the end of August. I was pretty much chain smoking at the time and I knew something had to give.... so I gave it a go. I was dreading it.

The attitude of "giving it a go" helped a lot, as I'd tried a few times in the past and was afraid to try again....afraid I was only setting myself up for another failure.

- So, without the success/failure factor.... just 'lets see how this goes'.... I was more able to take it one day at a time.

I used nicotine patches for a few weeks, but needed something more.. so I added vaping to fill the gaps (against pharmacy advice btw)... and this time it worked.

I was able to give it a go for one more day, and one more day and then another.. and it wasn't too bad. (If it had been awful, I would've gone back. I definitely wasn't going to force myself or go through hardship!)

Gave up the patches after a few weeks, am still vaping but less and less. Also, have gone down to a less strong vape.

I agree with Fuzzy that going off for a walk really helps.... but I wasn't great at that tbh. When you go, it's fab and really helps, but sometimes I just got into a loop of thinking about getting out for a walk, without actually moving! (That's just me.)

Best of luck with it. It's sooooo worth it to be free of them. :)

Socaljaxs
11-16-15, 11:59 AM
I quit smoking a few years ago, then I quit being a quitter and started up Again over a year ago.. and now, I smoke again and have found myself a few different occasions on my patio, chain smoking a day away....

When I quit. I too Switched to vaping, and this was before everyone really did vape... But I never stopped it was supposed to make quitting easier, but I would vape 0 ml and or the lowest amount... But since I was recovery from my surgery and bored with the constant stuck at home recovery....when my vaper(all three died same week), I started up smoking again and preferred cigarettes over vaping and resumed the smoking habit...

For me strange as it is, I find I'm more addicted to the habit of smoking(having something constantly to do, with my hands) than the nicotine need itself..I think my ADHD plays a big part of this with me constantly needing to be doing something....One major reason I believe why vaping was so easy for me, first time around.. I loved vaping, and the few time I did smoke a cigarette it was disgusting...

However, when I tried to go back to vaping as an aid to quit, a few different times this year, it was so difficult for me...it became impossible it felt like, for me to make it work, and I for the life of me can't figure out why.. I used the same juice that I loved and maybe it was the few newer different mods I tried... But all of these mods were crazy in strength, were too harsh for my throat even on lower watts and low level nicotine...

I May need to try again, with provari and the juice I favored, since that idid work before, and not be so into the crazy amount of vape these new models give,and yup all together, I just found trying and unsuccessfully quitting this time around...

I tried chantex and the side effects were not good IMO and I still found me smoking. So that went bye bye pretty fast..I will quit again.. My Muay Thai/MMA coach, said he won't let me fight until I quit... He was a smoker a few years back, And he successfully quit..He wants me to not be a smoker when I get back in the cage.. And I somehow can and always have been extremely active and do smoke Heavely, and for some reason am able to do vigorous workouts as a heavy smoker.

dvdnvwls
11-16-15, 03:26 PM
For some ADHDers at least, cigarettes create the "perfect storm" (or nearly so). First, perhaps unfortunately, nicotine has very definite positive effects on ADHD symptoms. Second, smoking provides a calming ritual. Third, it provides a social "crutch" in giving the ADHDer a focus and an "out" when interaction becomes awkward. Maybe there's more, but that's already a lot.

Socaljaxs
11-16-15, 03:38 PM
For some ADHDers at least, cigarettes create the "perfect storm" (or nearly so). First, perhaps unfortunately, nicotine has very definite positive effects on ADHD symptoms. Second, smoking provides a calming ritual. Third, it provides a social "crutch" in giving the ADHDer a focus and an "out" when interaction becomes awkward. Maybe there's more, but that's already a lot.

:thankyou::goodpost: yup I totally agree. With above... For me at least it is a calming ritual at least with my impulsivity and my excessive fidgeting... For me, it helps combat the need to be doing something with my hands.. Probably, a good reason that lozenges and patches don't work for me.. It keeps me doing something.. Like just holding a lit cigarette and puffing very little of it, satisifys this for me..

Yes, it's my way of removing myself from social interactions and settings, I'm no longer interested in being involved in as well... It also provides a nicer way to give me personal don't bug me time.. But the flip side in some situations, I find that smoking is a socializing activity for Me.... I connect with others that are outside or in the smoking only area, and it grants me more opportunities to socialize with other people..I know most of my neighbors and speak to some daily because I smoke.

-brian-
11-16-15, 03:53 PM
Smoking has affects on ADD!, this explains my coffee and chain smoking routine in the morning XD. got a hold of some vape equipment and am going to try and go from there. but I cant help but think I have been subconsciously de-stressing with the smoking. hopefully vapes will do the trick. just have to make sure i dont use it when im too stressed or ill just be supplementing one for the next. I also got some gum, (although i hate the taste) it helps in place where i cant smoke or vape.

aeon
11-16-15, 04:28 PM
For some ADHDers at least, cigarettes create the "perfect storm" (or nearly so). First, perhaps unfortunately, nicotine has very definite positive effects on ADHD symptoms. Second, smoking provides a calming ritual. Third, it provides a social "crutch" in giving the ADHDer a focus and an "out" when interaction becomes awkward. Maybe there's more, but that's already a lot.

Ding ding ding...we have a winner. :goodpost:

I could not have said it better myself.


Cheers,
Ian

madmax988
11-16-15, 05:12 PM
I used to smoke and wanted to quit for good.so I switched to an occasional cigar which helped me cut down on cigarettes fast and finally quit.
Its just a cigar or 2 in a year for me and no cravings anymore..strange,but it worked

dvdnvwls
11-16-15, 11:58 PM
Smoking has affects on ADD!, this explains my coffee and chain smoking routine in the morning XD. got a hold of some vape equipment and am going to try and go from there. but I cant help but think I have been subconsciously de-stressing with the smoking. hopefully vapes will do the trick. just have to make sure i dont use it when im too stressed or ill just be supplementing one for the next. I also got some gum, (although i hate the taste) it helps in place where i cant smoke or vape.
I can argue with you that the coffee is a desperate but ultimately failing attempt to make a difference in ADHD symptoms. Coffee is like "My car's engine is misfiring... Wait! I know, I'll put a bomb under the hood and wire it to the starter! That'll fix it!" :)

But nicotine really does (at least for some people) have a useful positive effect on ADHD.

Abcdef
11-18-15, 07:18 PM
Caffeine is horrible drug and should be wiped off the face of the planet......

All it does is increase the flow rate to the wrong parts of my brain and in turn make symptoms worse.

Through meds, good diet and exercise I can re-route things in a steady and controlled manner.

Polymorphed
11-22-15, 08:21 PM
And I somehow can and always have been extremely active and do smoke Heavely, and for some reason am able to do vigorous workouts as a heavy smoker.

Sympathetic dominance will lead to chronic dilation of the bronchioles, consequently improving lung performance.

In my observation, this could provide an explanation for co-morbid ADHD/Asthma patients having a reduction in Asthma symtpoms as over time as their Autonymous Nervous System increases its Sympathetic Tone.

Basically, chronic stress/anxiety/depression etc. will cause an improvement in efficiency of oxygen transportation to the brain. This is not a good thing if it occurs all the time, as it will lead to Adrenal Fatigue and cause burnout.

Polymorphed
11-22-15, 08:28 PM
For some ADHDers at least, cigarettes create the "perfect storm" (or nearly so). First, perhaps unfortunately, nicotine has very definite positive effects on ADHD symptoms. Second, smoking provides a calming ritual. Third, it provides a social "crutch" in giving the ADHDer a focus and an "out" when interaction becomes awkward. Maybe there's more, but that's already a lot.

Due to the obvious negatives of combusting tobacco, nicotine itself has attracted a lot of unwarranted criticism.

Nicotinic receptors are a part of Acetylcholine pathways, which are responsible for a lot of tasks, but most importantly in ADHD - memory performance/concentration/focus/relaxation. Combined subtypes are known to have one or more Acetylcholine polymorphisms, which can explain the gravitation towards smoking.

A lot of people who don't and haven't ever smoked cigarettes who have ADHD or other psychiatric disorders are reporting positives from the use of Vaporising devices with basic nicotine oils. This eliminates all the tobacco derivatives and also removes combustion from the process.

-brian-
11-23-15, 01:01 AM
Due to the obvious negatives of combusting tobacco, nicotine itself has attracted a lot of unwarranted criticism.

Nicotinic receptors are a part of Acetylcholine pathways, which are responsible for a lot of tasks, but most importantly in ADHD - memory performance/concentration/focus/relaxation. Combined subtypes are known to have one or more Acetylcholine polymorphisms, which can explain the gravitation towards smoking.

A lot of people who don't and haven't ever smoked cigarettes who have ADHD or other psychiatric disorders are reporting positives from the use of Vaporising devices with basic nicotine oils. This eliminates all the tobacco derivatives and also removes combustion from the process.


Im only worried of the after affects as I cant vape all day. Does anyone know if using nicotine will become a crutch. I feel like it helps during and a bit after but then you need to continue or symptoms become worse. Has anyone quit and been able to notice a permanent decrease in cognitive function while on or off meds.

Polymorphed
11-23-15, 09:04 PM
Im only worried of the after affects as I cant vape all day. Does anyone know if using nicotine will become a crutch. I feel like it helps during and a bit after but then you need to continue or symptoms become worse. Has anyone quit and been able to notice a permanent decrease in cognitive function while on or off meds.

I'd encourage personal research into vaping nicotine. There are probably forums like this one dedicated to it.

If your GP is open-minded or up-to-pace on the topic, they may be able to provide more guidance. Over here we have a QUIT hotline we can call for advice and information packs etc.

Even if nicotine itself is not addictive when used within certain guidelines, the association between the action of consuming it and feeling a sense of enhanced well being or cognitive performance could certainly lead to a habit.

Whether or not a nicotine vaping habit is a bad thing is a topic of controversy, but certainly if you already smoke it's obviously a superior option.

If you don't smoke, then I think research on other forums and just a personal trial period is the best approach.

Abcdef
11-25-15, 09:15 PM
4,000 chemicals from burning tobacco alone....

Nicotine...yes still harmful and addictive but not on the same scale.

Lets gradually work away from this industry....yes the tobacco industry have seen potential in this. replace liquids, coils...it's just another money game for them...

Lets say no...for our health's sake and financial situation :)

However addicted we may be, there is always a reverse gear.

dvdnvwls
11-25-15, 09:30 PM
Think carefully about the word "crutch". If a person has broken his leg, do you tell him to throw away the sticks he's using to support himself? A crutch is usually a good thing, and it's also something people wouldn't choose to use unless it was helpful. Twelve-step programs have co-opted the word "crutch" and made it sound dirty or immoral, but that doesn't relate to the facts.

Polymorphed
11-25-15, 09:55 PM
4,000 chemicals from burning tobacco alone....

Nicotine...yes still harmful and addictive but not on the same scale.

Lets gradually work away from this industry....yes the tobacco industry have seen potential in this. replace liquids, coils...it's just another money game for them...

Lets say no...for our health's sake and financial situation :)

However addicted we may be, there is always a reverse gear.

There is a lot of research being conducted presently investigating a few hypotheses about the use of nicotine as a holistic approach to treating combined ADHD subtypes, due to the prevalence of Acetylcholine (including nicotinic receptors, obviously) polymorphisms.

Basically, the positives could potentially outweigh the negatives in these (and other) individuals. This weighing up of pros and cons is a standard process for any therapeutic drug. There are always both to some extent. I think the negative stigma and association of nicotine (due to the tobacco industry) is allowing prejudice to interfere with this understanding within the general public.

I don't disagree with your anti-consumerist mentally though! :)

sarahsweets
11-26-15, 07:24 AM
Lets gradually work away from this industry....yes the tobacco industry have seen potential in this. replace liquids, coils...it's just another money game for them...

As far as I know the tobacco industry is threatened by the vaping revolution. At least the ones I use are not associated with Big tobacco.


However addicted we may be, there is always a reverse gear.
What do you mean by this?

ceuinfo
12-02-15, 03:14 PM
Hypnosis works great also Emotional Freedom Techniques is wonderful. I stopped a 4.5 pack a day habit in 1979 and wrote out how i did it. Is use this along with other methods to help people stop and stay stopped. I offer SKYPE and Live sessions.

Neurofeedback, meditation, EFT, TFT, (Brain Gym and One Brain contact Terry Wade 713-952-9717) also work with ADHD. I offer homestudy training's on EFT and TFT(meridian tapping) call me on SKYPE for a free EFT/TFT session.

Michael Yeager B.A., LCDC, C.ht, CAS, SAP
The Council on Holistic Healing and Recovery
www.holisticouncil.org
therapy@ceuinfo.com
713-461-3279

420_easter
02-07-16, 02:15 PM
I'm a unique person when it came to quitting cigarette's as i just decided to stop buying them.

I understand not many people are able to do this for whatever reason so best thing to do is write down the consequences where you can read them whenever you feel like going and buying them again also write the positives of quitting smoking to remind you why you quit.

huskerdrew88
04-08-16, 09:58 PM
I'm on my 4th day of Cold Turkey quitting heavy smoking AND/OR Vaping for 13 years. i ripped the Filter out of my Camel Wides and could vape 15ml (a normal sized $10-15 bottle) in a day. I'd planned to go through my Health Insurance and get the Patch, but that would take a few months, so I just took the leap and had my last few Cigarettes and leftover E-Liquid on Monday night because I knew that if I had ANYTHING I would smoke it. I can't express how difficult it has been, but I'm using my DBT Coping Skills and keeping myself occupied and stimulated. I haven't so much as snapped or gotten upset with anyone, which is massively surprising. Also, I was just ready to end that chapter in my personal history. Please let me know if you have questions or I can be of any assistance.

Best Regards,
Drew

i41agree
04-09-16, 10:32 AM
Huskerdrew88: Are you doing anything to aggressively address your ADHD at the moment? As soon as I did that, I gave up 3 compulsive/addictive substances/behaviors without a lot of effort. So far, at least.

Jiberish
04-25-16, 01:13 PM
I am over a month clean of chewing tobacco. I didnt know but I guess it had more nicotine in it. Anyways, it took about 3 months to get 1 day for me. Granted, im also injured, so I cannot workout or anything, so sitting at home.......thinking about a chew......horrible. I ended up going camping without chew for 3 days. It gave me what I needed to get 36 hours. After that, it seemed to be more mental than anything. Everyone finds a way if they try hard enough, and remember, it takes the average person 6 tries to eventually stop. Took me 7 ;)