View Full Version : Creativity and busy minds-- ADHD


Kunga Dorji
11-21-15, 01:38 AM
An interesting new paper:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028393210005002

The origins of originality: The neural bases of creative thinking and originality

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Abstract

Although creativity has been related to prefrontal activity, recent neurological case studies postulate that patients who have left frontal and temporal degeneration involving deterioration of language abilities may actually develop de novo artistic abilities. In this study, we propose a neural and cognitive model according to which a balance between the two hemispheres affects a major aspect of creative cognition, namely, originality. In order to examine the neural basis of originality, that is, the ability to produce statistically infrequent ideas, patients with localized lesions in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and posterior parietal and temporal cortex (PC), were assessed by two tasks involving divergent thinking and originality. Results indicate that lesions in the mPFC involved the most profound impairment in originality. Furthermore, precise anatomical mapping of lesions indicated that while the extent of lesion in the right mPFC was associated with impaired originality, lesions in the left PC were associated with somewhat elevated levels of originality. A positive correlation between creativity scores and left PC lesions indicated that the larger the lesion is in this area the greater the originality. On the other hand, a negative correlation was observed between originality scores and lesions in the right mPFC. It is concluded that the right mPFC is part of a right fronto-parietal network which is responsible for producing original ideas. It is possible that more linear cognitive processing such as language, mediated by left hemisphere structures interferes with creative cognition. Therefore, lesions in the left hemisphere may be associated with elevated levels of originality.

Research highlights

▶ A balance between the two hemispheres is responsible for originality. ▶ Lesions in the mPFC involve impairment in originality. ▶ Left temporoparietal lesions are associated with elevated levels of originality. ▶ The right fronto-parietal network is responsible for originality. ▶ More linear cognitive processing interferes with creative cognition.
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So for a more intellectually accessable discussion:


http://neurosciencenews.com/creativity-neural-networks-3139/



Developing an original and creative idea requires the simultaneous activation of two completely different networks in the brain



So - given the propensity of the ADHD individual to have intrusive thoughts when doing another task, here we see a very clear reason why that would be expected to be a generator of creative new ideas, and a neurological basis for that reason.


It can be relatively easily demonstrated that most ADHD individuals have a pattern of brain activation which is usually right hemisphere dominant.
this right hemispere dominance is usually driven by a lack of stimulation to the left cerebral hemisphere from an underactive right cerebellum-- but that is another story.

TheFactsMachine
11-23-15, 02:39 AM
It's not a hemispherical problem, certain regions responsible for certain things happen to be on one side or the other. ADHD is a problem with the prefrontal cortex, and thus dopamine and noreponephrine. Which I'm sure you know. The prefrontal cortex does not have a "handedness" and therefore no affinity for one hemisphere or the other.

I may be wrong, if so, tell me.

Kunga Dorji
11-25-15, 12:16 AM
It's not a hemispherical problem, certain regions responsible for certain things happen to be on one side or the other. ADHD is a problem with the prefrontal cortex, and thus dopamine and noreponephrine. Which I'm sure you know. The prefrontal cortex does not have a "handedness" and therefore no affinity for one hemisphere or the other.

I may be wrong, if so, tell me.

There are very distinct differences in the function of the left and right PFC.
( See "The Master and His Apprentice, The Divided Brain and the Making of The Western World" Iain McGilchist).

Also it is well worth reviewing the work of the neurologist Richard Davidson, which, among other things clearly correlates depression with a dominance or Right PFC activation over L PFC activation.

For clarification of the subcortical origins of ADHD, I would recommend these 2 books:
There is a useful basis for understanding this in the books
“ADHD as a model of brain/behaviour relationships” Koziol, L. Budding, DE and Chikidel, D.
and "Subcortical Structures and Cognition". Koziol, L. & Budding D.E.

It might also help you to look up "Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome"


Actually most ADHD patients show distinct hemispheric activation asymmetry. It can be demonstrated through SPECT and also very easily via eye examinations - with sufficient training, or by LORETA QEEG.

ADHD is primarily a disorder in which the attention is commandeered by subcortical stimuli, (ventral attention network predominating over dorsal attention network).
In fact there are well defined dysfunctions in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, all of which are responding to dysfunctional afferent stimulation from the brainstem. That dysfunctional afferent stimulation in turn, is largely driven by distorted proprioceptive information from the Gamma stretch receptors in the deep upper cervical musculature.
(However - proving that today will take more time than I have free).