View Full Version : Who here uses Linux?


Ichpuchtli
05-02-05, 04:33 AM
All I want to know is who uses Linux here.

myside
05-02-05, 04:54 AM
I have an Ubuntu, Fedora Core 3 system, and a FreeBSD box. What do you run?

shinobi
05-02-05, 04:57 AM
used linux in the past, great for servers but not so great for graphics people like me, designed on a mac, tested on a win box then hosted on a linux box :)

Maxwell
05-02-05, 04:58 AM
I use Ubuntu on my laptop. Though it's not a large as Fedora, it's a great up and coming distribution. I wish it included XEmacs with it, though!<o:p></o:p>

myside
05-02-05, 05:07 AM
I use Ubuntu on my laptop. Though it's not a large as Fedora, it's a great up and coming distribution. I wish it included XEmacs with it, though!<o ="">:p></o>:p>
Ubuntu was the first Debian based distribution I have tried. I have always been an RPM fan, or an old fashioned .tgz fogy. I have to say though, I am quite impressed with this installation. I like Gnome, and Ubuntu neatly integrates it into the desktop. :D

Ian
05-02-05, 09:36 AM
Debian, Fedora, And now getting my way around Freebsd and Slackware.

bricktop
05-02-05, 10:02 AM
I dual boot with Gentoo and Windows XP SP2. Gentoo is my favorite linux distro, I suggest you all give it a try!

HighFunctioning
10-01-05, 10:07 PM
Both my desktop and my laptop dual boot between Windows XP and Slackware 10.1. The computer next to me (my storage/backup server) is running FreeBSD 4.10.

Ian
10-03-05, 10:34 AM
I live in Linux. Virus, worm and trogan free since January 2001. I'm still trying to get away from rpm based systems.
Cheers! Ian.

"When you use proprietary software, you're a sharecropper on your own brain."

UnleashTheHound
10-03-05, 01:17 PM
I've used Linux since 95. Started on Slackware, and used mostly Red Hat since then. I have Fedora Core 3 on one system, and Red Hat 9 on another.

UnleashTheHound
10-03-05, 01:19 PM
I dual boot with Gentoo and Windows XP SP2. Gentoo is my favorite linux distro, I suggest you all give it a try!
I've encountered some gentoo systems at work. Frankly, I don't understand the appeal. Why would I want to compile everything from source? Who has that much free time?

Ichpuchtli
10-12-05, 04:01 AM
I shoulda mentioned that I use SUSE Linux I think. D'oh!

meldroc
10-12-05, 10:31 PM
I use Ubuntu on my laptop. Though it's not a large as Fedora, it's a great up and coming distribution. I wish it included XEmacs with it, though!<o:p></o:p>

Did you enable the universe and multiverse repositories in your /etc/apt/sources.list? One of those two should have xemacs and zillions of other cool packages - almost all of what's available in Debian Sid.

Me, I run Ubuntu at home and at work - just scored a job in HP's Open Source & Linux Organization. :cool: We do a lot of work on Red Hat and SUSE based servers & clusters.

BCdude
10-26-05, 05:06 PM
For a while I was playing around with Red Hat since it seems like its the easiest to jump into (that, and it was the version that my networking diploma program was teaching), as well as Knoppix. However, since I have been committing myself to studying for my Microsoft certifications, I have had to trade off linux for Windows XP and 2000/2003 server. Once I finish those, I will be back to using linux almost exclusivly

speedo
10-29-05, 03:15 PM
I use Fedora and FreeBSD at home. I use Fedora and Enterprise Linux at work... I mostly build clusters for high performance computing as well as dedicated clustered solutions...but I also happen to be root and do some admin work when I need to.

Me :D

Ian
10-29-05, 10:01 PM
Did you enable the universe and multiverse repositories in your /etc/apt/sources.list? One of those two should have xemacs and zillions of other cool packages - almost all of what's available in Debian Sid.

Me, I run Ubuntu at home and at work - just scored a job in HP's Open Source & Linux Organization. :cool: We do a lot of work on Red Hat and SUSE based servers & clusters.
Nice gig! Good luck with the new job!

speedo
10-29-05, 10:34 PM
Your plan 9 bunny is very cool. Going to make a 9-grid ?

Me :D


Both my desktop and my laptop dual boot between Windows XP and Slackware 10.1. The computer next to me (my storage/backup server) is running FreeBSD 4.10.

HighFunctioning
10-30-05, 10:41 AM
I could only wish. I need to acquire more hardware first.

I guess a "virtualized" 9grid will have to do for now.


Your plan 9 bunny is very cool. Going to make a 9-grid ?

Me :D

speedo
10-30-05, 02:51 PM
I am slowly building up a heterogenous cluster. So far I have 14 FBSD machines on via C3 cpu's and parts for three dual opteron nodes. I only have one dual opteron machine up with Fedora right now and it is acting as a head node for my VIA cluster and a couple more over the inet.

ME :D

I could only wish. I need to acquire more hardware first.

I guess a "virtualized" 9grid will have to do for now.

katatak
02-08-06, 02:58 AM
All I want to know is who uses Linux here.
I have run Macs mostly, MkLinux was my first linux -- currently I have three Debian boxes up 'n running. Just lately converted my token WindBloze box into a DeMuDi (audio specialized version of Debian) workstation. I can't quite give up my iBook to Linux. OS X is just to kewel, but still... virus free here!

All of you who use Red Hat RPM systems, you can install the debina Apt system over top and it works great! You still get all the advantages of hte RPM's packaging as well as the great dependency checks and upgrading facilities of Apt-get.

cheers.
Katatak

Adamant1988
06-01-06, 05:33 PM
I'm using linux... couldn't really say which distro since I'm hopping a lot, but I'm trying to find a home... if anyone thinks they could help let me know :)

susane
06-01-06, 06:55 PM
Wow! There is a lot of Linux people here...great to see. :) My laptop is a dual boot Gentoo and Windows XP. The company I work for specializes in Linux...that is what we develop and sell.

speedo
06-01-06, 07:02 PM
neat! We use linux at work for our software development.


ME :D

Adamant1988
06-01-06, 10:39 PM
Yeah use is a pretty light term for me though, I WANT to use linux but I keep finding myself back on my windows box, downloading more isos to try
So far the only thing I've discovered is that I REALLY like the enlightenment gui.

JimiS
06-02-06, 12:26 AM
Linux can almost do anything and everything that windoze can do..

If you are a Fedora Core user then you can go to www.fedoraforum.org..

susane
06-02-06, 01:16 AM
neat! We use linux at work for our software development.


ME :DThat is great to hear! We are using it to develop software and we have a few server products too. :cool: We used to be a RedHat shop, but the developers thought it was heading down the same road as Windows, so they migrated to Gentoo. They hound me constantly about giving up Windows all together, but I can't...I am used to it. I play around on Linux a lot though...it is great for hyperfocusing.:) I don't develop, I just sell the products and the services that go along with them...

Linux people are great...they are so creative!

Ian
06-02-06, 01:31 AM
I've been winduhs free since January of 2001 and couldn't be happier for making the leap. I'm not much of a gamer and I think that's all I could think of that might suffer on *nix, but on line games should be just the same except without the need to reboot. :P

I've spent most of my time on rpm boxes just because they seem to have worked easiest for me and time seems to always be an issue. I still like the conservative nature of Debian based systems. Another great thing about systems like Gentoo and Debian is that the packages are broken down in such a way that the updates actually migrate you to the next version.

Think about that a minute and I'm sure you'll see the wisdom of that. I installed Debian on my girls box and basically walked away for a month. I had difficulty learning some of the complaint lines apt-get sent me so eventually retreated to Fedora.

Fedora is an rpm based system though and thus gets outdated quickly and in need of a reinstall which I have come to detest.
Great to see so many Linux heads here!

Not one bit of malware, virus, trojan, worm, nadado in five years. Go GNU!

ummagumma
06-02-06, 01:58 AM
I've been doing Linux server administration for 10 years now. It's an amazingly capable server OS, and the open-source applications are by and large very secure, reliable, and versatile. I've also done my share of Windows server administration, and hated it. You need almost twice the computing power to handle the same load, customizations tend to be costly, impossible, or involve trying to make sense of Microsoft's poorly-written and often wildly out-of-date API documentation to write your own stuff. And then there's Microsoft's security record. As far as I'm concerned, Linux is vastly superior in pretty much every way, except possibly for easily getting everything to run out-of-the-box. But if you don't know how to set up Apache or qmail, you don't belong near a server of any importance anyway.

The desktop, however, is a completely different story. I use Windows XP at home and on my desktop computer at work, and wouldn't even consider Linux. My work involves Photoshop, testing how web apps render in Internet Explorer, etc. Sometimes I need to develop something in Visual Studio. And at home, I like to play Battlefield 2 sometimes. I've tried using Linux at home. I know all about the alternative open-source stuff out there, as well as things like Wine and VMWare to run Windows apps, but what's the point? It's like buying a car and then hacking it up to convert it into a pickup truck, when you could just as easily buy the truck.

Adamant1988
06-02-06, 02:57 PM
has anyone here had a go at linspire?

Adamant1988
06-03-06, 10:40 AM
Well I'm installing kubuntu right now :) everyone wish me luck.

speedo
06-03-06, 12:24 PM
We currently use Fedora for our experimental machines. We briefly had a FC5 machine, which was donwgraded back to FC4 because of graphics driver problems.
As far as I can tell it looks like OpenGL is going to remain broken on the open source Fedora istributions and my guess is it only be available for RH payware. I think Fedora Core and RH could go the way of the Do-Do if they don't get their act together.

I am getting an increasing sense that they are selectively adding/breaking features. I know that a lot of what were freeware packages are no longer available on Fedora and you have to buy RH packages to get many of them. Redhat's policy seems to be "If you can't own it, don't offer it". When it comes to software packages.

Bwecause of all this crap I am pushing for a migration to another distribution at work. Probably Debian or Gentoo.

ME :D


That is great to hear! We are using it to develop software and we have a few server products too. :cool: We used to be a RedHat shop, but the developers thought it was heading down the same road as Windows, so they migrated to Gentoo. They hound me constantly about giving up Windows all together, but I can't...I am used to it. I play around on Linux a lot though...it is great for hyperfocusing.:) I don't develop, I just sell the products and the services that go along with them...

Linux people are great...they are so creative!

Adamant1988
06-05-06, 08:25 PM
I have linspire installed on my laptop, I absolutely love it. Having a sound problem for my desktop though... I want to get linspire on it if at all possible...

Adamant1988
06-06-06, 12:47 PM
I'm officially an Ubuntu Dapper user HOLY CRAP it's amazing.

strawberry_fool
06-21-06, 01:16 PM
Had no idea there was a Tech Forum here, cool.

I'm a librarian at a small college and last year I assumed the systems duties and got a quick a dirty intro to Linux. The website runs on a Mandrake box and the library system database on Solaris 9. Initially I was very insecure in this position due to my lack of experience, always worrying that one of my machines would go down before learned all I needed to know. But, whenever there's a problem on campus my servers just reboot and run as if nothing had happened.

Came across Ubuntu and used it at home exclusively for the past year. Planning to move the library website to an Ubuntu box I'm setting up at work.

The past few months I've been on an install fest at home and having a blast. Wanted to try Fedora because its popular and I'd never tried it. Used it for a short while and then got the itch again and installed Slackware, then tried to install Gentoo which took me nearly 3 weeks and by the time I got it up and running I didn't even want to use it. Now I'm playing around with OpenBSD and think I've found my preferred distro.

While I'm at it, if anyone knows of any good Solaris resources (books, guides, tutorials, sites, etc.) other than Sun docs (huh?) I'd be forever grateful.

Ian
06-21-06, 02:35 PM
Do you know if Ubuntu migrates to the next version through it's updates or do you need to reinstall?

I'd be curious to hear a review of OpenBSD. I've been flirting with the idea of moving to OpenBSD or some other more conservative distro. Fedora is not my cup of tea any longer. Gentoo's system of updating was based on the "ports" ideas and I really like that element of Gentoo.
Cheers! Ian

strawberry_fool
06-22-06, 09:07 AM
Do you know if Ubuntu migrates to the next version through it's updates or do you need to reinstall?

I'd be curious to hear a review of OpenBSD. I've been flirting with the idea of moving to OpenBSD or some other more conservative distro. Fedora is not my cup of tea any longer. Gentoo's system of updating was based on the "ports" ideas and I really like that element of Gentoo.
Cheers! Ian
You can technically get the new version by editing your sources.list/repositories but it didn't work when I tried to migrate up from Hoary to Breezy. Didn't lose any data but found myself still in Hoary and with a few errors to resolve. I found a lot of posts online suggesting that its generally safer to do a reinstall.

Just installed OpenBSD last week and its a very quick process. You can be up and running in around 15 minutes but bear in mind that you start out with the bare minimum in terms of applications. I have installed some desktop applications using both the ports system and the packages system and both work equally well in my opinion.

What I like most I think is that the developers are code perfectionists and you can be pretty sure that packages they offer will work with little to no hacking. It feels more sturdy at the core than the Linux distros, where you often must glue together a lot of different things to get an app to work properly. But to be fair, I never had any serious troubles with Mandrake or Ubuntu so part of my newfound fondness of BSD may be psychological...I just like the idea of a clean foundation to build upon.

I discovered DesktopBSD (http://www.desktopbsd.net/) but haven't tried it. Basically FreeBSD with with a nice desktop set-up to make your life easier to start. The advantage to this is having a browser and can search if you need help, whereas with regular Free or OpenBSD you're pretty much bound to the command-line until you install your own desktop apps.

Onward and Upward! :)

Ian
06-22-06, 09:56 AM
I bet OpenBSD leaves you the lynx browser, but connectivity is another issue I suppose. < g >

Thanks for the mini review, it's appreciated. Maybe this summer I'll take time to clean house here and make some room for some computer time again.

I too am looking for a much more robust setup.
Cheers!

muddz
07-09-06, 05:29 PM
I like openbsd i have it installed on couple machines here on my network....on sparc and a intel 400mhz....I have used it since release 3.2....It was the first bsd i used and learned it pretty smootly plus the packet filtering is nice in it....When i use it for desktop machine i use blackbox as desktop....here is little dmesg output...
$ dmesg
OpenBSD 3.9-stable (Moscow) #0: Thu May 11 10:43:51 CDT 2006
lostbuffer@lostbuffer.homeunix.com:/usr/src/sys/arch/i386/compile/Moscow

Ian
07-09-06, 05:58 PM
Try $ uname -ra

Not sure if it works with BSD variations, but I've become addicted. :D

If you like blackbox, you might find fluxbox right down your alley. I started with blackbox but have been with flux for a few years now and really wouldn't turn back. It's similar, but not as conservative.
Cheers!

speedo
07-09-06, 11:17 PM
I'm running FreeBSD 6.1 with KDE on my new machine and I really like it a Lot.

I had to install KDE and then install KDM, then I had to add a line to rc.local to start KDM, but man it sure works great.

ME :D

muddz
07-10-06, 02:22 PM
Fluxbox is good too, I just been using blackbox for years now and usually just use it ...I never messed with freebsd much but i hear it is nice....I gonna custumize my snort rules today with bleeding edge ruleset and sguil console....I have became addicted to hardstyle music while working on computer stuff seems to keep my mind busy :) Any of you use silc at all?

scatter-g
03-21-07, 12:09 PM
Here's all the Linux geeks!
I have been a Slackware user for four years.
I am currently using 10.2 on an IBM Thinkpad with Fluxbox for a widow manager.
I must say, it rocks!! I love the cofigurability of fluxbox -- it's really easy to customize keyboard shortcuts, for example, just be editing a text file.

-g

Ian
03-22-07, 12:23 AM
Fluxbox is outstanding. It's just like it should be. Lean and functional. :D
M$ free since January 2001.

pedalpounder
03-22-07, 12:39 AM
I work for M$. Ian, I'd be glad to offer you a very large discount on a copy of Vista Ultimate.

Ian
03-22-07, 09:54 AM
I'll pass, but thanks. There are many things I don't miss about running Micro$oft products. First and foremost is that I haven't had to fear any attachments or any other form of malware since making the switch. The change in mindset is remarkable. Have you been able to experience some of that yourself through Linux? The Knoppix live cd's are a good place to begin, if not. That won't require anything to be installed.
cheers!

pedalpounder
03-22-07, 11:36 AM
I use my computer for games, so it has to be Windows for me.

You'd be surprised by the HUGE and I mean HUGE focus we put on security in every product we ship. Every developer and tester has to attend several training sessions every year, is forced to read security books, must do code analysis to find problems. And then there are the security reviews, the hired hackers, the stringent list of checks. It's never enough though. The complexity of software is such that a change in one piece of code somewhere to fix a bug can introduce a bug or security hole somewhere else in the product. Like the butterfly that flaps its wings. Btw, over the course of the development of one cycle of Microsoft Office, there are over half a million bugs reported internally by our testers and fixed by our developers. This is a MASSIVE undertaking.

We're keenly aware that by being the largest provider of Operating Systems and Office software, we are the target of choice by hackers. We are better at security than any of our competitors. Backward compatibility means we are creating a product built from the remnants of software created when security was not a concern in pre-mass-network days. This is a big part of the reason why it took us a long time to get there.

Ian
03-22-07, 12:43 PM
Given that this is a thread about and for Linux users, I'm not comfortable providing a platform for windoz discussions. The mods will likely kick shortly and have their way with us, so this is the last from me on this hijack.

I'm not a gamer at all, but I understand the need for the winduhs platform there.

Do you know how many times I've heard that refrain about security? :D Through many, many versions.

The proof of the pudding will be in the eating as always. The reviews haven't been good enough to even tempt me toward Vista. It's still tremendously resource hungry too. M$ still doesn't get it, none of it, but that's OK with me. There are operating systems and software for all tastes now so we can all find a place where we're comfortable.

Biodiversity fan - Ian

what is essential is invisible to the eye
antoine de saint-exupery

mijahe
06-04-07, 07:59 PM
I've been a Linux user since the early days, (kernel 0.99). I used slackware back then, (nothing else really was as good). Then went to Mandrake, (was good for a while - bleeding edge stuff). Then Debian. Running several AMD64 boxes with Lenny and Etch now, a couple of Suns and HPs, (dual boot into either Debian or SunOS and HPUX), and two iPAQs, (familiar release).

The only reason I use Windows is for the 3D games. Well, I don't really play them much. I'll buy a game for the kids and play it for the first week, and then get bored with it. The kids have started noticing all the games you can play on Linux and now prefer those. So the Windows box just gets used for the occasional 3D shooters.

Gentoo
06-07-07, 01:52 AM
Switched to Linux last year. I use Gentoo but I also like Slackware.

To be honest, I'm starting to think I'd like FreeBSD better than Linux but I have to wait until I get a new ethernet card that supports it.

mijahe
06-07-07, 02:29 AM
Switched to Linux last year. I use Gentoo but I also like Slackware.

To be honest, I'm starting to think I'd like FreeBSD better than Linux but I have to wait until I get a new ethernet card that supports it.FreeBSD has now taken on the title of 'hackers O/S'. These days Linux is run of the mill - well with a few usability issues still. You'll find things consistent in FreeBSD, but a bit harder on the ol' noggin, and, (as you said), there's not much support for newer hardware.

Why don't you try FreeBSD as a virtual using vmware-server? Then you can get familiar with it before switching.

Gentoo
06-07-07, 06:23 AM
Well I know how to install and configure it and I have a basic idea of ports so I think it will be an easy transition for me. Besides, I prefer to just jump in and do things. Running an OS I want to try in VirtualBox is boring!

Onine
06-11-07, 11:00 AM
I have tried FC5. You know that piece-of-gold OS will run even if you have a shorted motherboard.

mijahe
06-11-07, 06:10 PM
I have tried FC5. You know that piece-of-gold OS will run even if you have a shorted motherboard.You can actually get Linux to run, even if you have shorted RAM address lines, or chunks of memory missing. It's part of the kernel args - just google for it.

I had a laptop that had dud onboard memory - would crash the laptop every time it booted Windows. So, I installed Linux, ran memtest86 on it to determine that the base memory was stuffed, and bypassed it as part of the startup args. It ran fine as a firewall for several years.

Ian
06-11-07, 06:30 PM
I never cease to be amazed at the opportunities for fun with open source software.
Thanks

mijahe
06-11-07, 10:39 PM
I never cease to be amazed at the opportunities for fun with open source software.
ThanksOh yeah. OSS is good for ADDers - quick, multiple options, and you can hack it yourself if you want. An ADDer's dream.

Ian
06-12-07, 01:29 PM
Oh yeah. OSS is good for ADDers - quick, multiple options, and you can hack it yourself if you want. An ADDer's dream.It would not surprise me to learn that ADD types have driven much of it's success. I agree completely with you that it's seemingly perfectly suited for my high levels of curiosity.

glen_ap
06-12-07, 04:32 PM
I've been using Debian Etch (now stable) for about a year. Prior to that I had many install/uninstall experiences with Linux/FreeBSD. I had tried RedHat, Slackware, FreeBSD, and Ubuntu. I didn't like RedHat. I was too inexperienced to get Slackware running. And I liked the concept of FreeBSD, but when using Portage to compile some packages it kept failing on me. I blame that on my inexperience at the time. And I should have tried installing binaries, but for some reason I thought compiling was the only way to go. Man have I changed my tune. I finally tried Ubuntu and liked it. But the deeper I dug, the more I realized that Debian proper was more to my taste.

I now have 3 boxes running Debian; 2 on Etch and 1 on Lenny. I have started converting my family over as well.

There are two things I like most about Debian. 1) It is 100% committed to Free software. 2) It's policy allows package management to work better than any other system I have experienced.

Because I program with the .NET framework, I still keep a Windows box around; but it really annoys me! :) I look forward to a time when I can continue programming, but no longer on a Windows platform. It would be economically unwise for me to switch right now.

speedo
06-12-07, 07:44 PM
I'm running FREEBSD 6.1 here at home. I've got 12 computers running a single system image from the controlling node. It's kind of fun to have your own supercomputer. I use it as a testbed for parallel computing projects.

The controlling node also acts as the dhcp server for my primary lan. I also have a machine running Fedora 7, and an old one running FC3.

At work we use Fedroa. I'm in the process of migrating our current install packages into FC7. We have machiens as far back as FC3. I've used every version of Fedora except FC2. I personally think thatFC4 has been the best one, but FC7 might just change my opinion.

I've used ROCKS and it is a POS imho. Suse and Umbuntu are good OS's... Dragonfly BSD is a nice dream, but I don't see a lot happening there.
Debian has SO MUCh software.... but I'm disenchanted with debian.. they don't support my hardware very well.

Oh and as far back as I can remember FBSD has been the hackers choice. It is not a new thing at all. I've had good luck getting it to work with newer hardware.

RHEL abd CENTOS are silly. they sell a two year old OS that mostly works with older HP and IBM hardware. They call it "stable" because it is never going to change. People think that means it is better. I'd like to have some of whatever they are smoking......

and Plan 9? Well it has no real development. It was a great idea 10 years ago.

Me :D

HighFunctioning
06-12-07, 08:12 PM
Come on.... RHEL isn't silly. It's right up there with COBOL .NET. :D

HighFunctioning
06-12-07, 08:42 PM
I have two systems only right now sitting in this room... One dual boots between Windows XP and FreeBSD 6.2 and the other is running Debian. The Debian system has given me 450 days of continuous trouble free operation so far (I'm not surprised about the OS, but more about the hardware). It's used mostly as a firewall/file server/print server/X server, etc. (many other services). I do often use it directly, either physically or through XDMCP. But then again, I have not had much trouble with windows XP concerning overall stability either. It's just not a very good headless operating system (it can be improved with other programs, but it is still not UNIX-like).

mijahe
06-13-07, 12:08 AM
I've been using Debian Etch (now stable) for about a year.
Etch was a good release - the first for AMD64.


There are two things I like most about Debian. 1) It is 100% committed to Free software. 2) It's policy allows package management to work better than any other system I have experienced.
I agree with those, but for me also:
3) It runs on anything - my Sun, HP, iPAQ, AMD64, and i386 machines.
4) It has so much software I can't remember the last I had to manually build something. Actually I can, but that was because of point 1) it was dropped out of the dist.



Oh and as far back as I can remember FBSD has been the hackers choice. It is not a new thing at all. I've had good luck getting it to work with newer hardware.
Yep, I meant that Linux has come into the mainstream and shed much of it's 'hacking" past. BSD has always been, (and will probably always be), a hackers O/S.


Debian has SO MUCh software.... but I'm disenchanted with debian.. they don't support my hardware very well.
I had an issue with an HDTV PCI card a year or so ago, (and always issues with ATI cards), but apart from those I haven't had real issues for some time now. (Gosh, I can't remember the last time I had to rebuild the kernel.) I've heard of people having issues with various hardware, but I tend to google for any hardware I'm looking at buying, and avoid it.
Heck, I just remembered I do have an issue with my current gigabyte HDA chipset being unsupported, but I just slotted in a spare PCI audio card I had lying around.

mijahe
06-13-07, 12:24 AM
A couple of months ago my work was ditching around 60 laptops. I was walking past the removelists literally chucking them into a dumpster. Of course, being an ADDer and a geek I couldn't let this pass up and managed to claim all of them and took them home, ("Honey, look what I got!" - I didn't get a good response from my better half.)

Anyway, most of the good ones ended up being motion detection camera boxes, (just attach a USB cam and run 'motion' - apt-get install motion), mp3 players, (mpd player is really good for this), two redundant firewalls/proxy servers, (transparent squid, dansguardian, and iptables), two redundant file servers, (NFS and samba), PVR, ('vdr' is pretty good for this), and a couple of web servers to control my CBus wiring.

As some of them died, I just replaced them - it was a good setup for while. I still have the firewalls, and mp3 players, but I recently beefed up my file servers with two dual core AMD64 servers, (redundant), with 3Tbytes of storage, and started to virtualize all the other services with vmware and vserver, (DNS, LDAP, samba, NFS, squid, dansguardian, vdr, and mp3 streamer).

Ian
06-13-07, 08:33 PM
Ah to live through the Debian learning curve. I've been frustrated in the past with apt messages about not updating one thing or another. I'm such a poser. heh

mijahe
06-13-07, 10:15 PM
Ah to live through the Debian learning curve. I've been frustrated in the past with apt messages about not updating one thing or another. I'm such a poser. hehIt's ok these days, but the one thing that debian still needs to work on is downgrading. It's not as simple as 'apt-get uninstall' nor 'apt-get dist-downgrade'. The only package management system that beats Debian hands down is HP-UX's Software Distributor. Upgrade/downgrade as much as you like, rollback patches, re-apply them. Install via network, tape, CD, disk. Very nice.

Forget Sun's pkgadd - it's a joke. RedHat is OK, especially when they introduced yum.

Ian
06-13-07, 10:53 PM
Probably no worse than chasing files after compiling something that fell short of the mark. I'm bound and determined to live in Debian one day soon, but I've been threatening that for a while now.

mijahe
06-14-07, 02:26 AM
Probably no worse than chasing files after compiling something that fell short of the mark. I'm bound and determined to live in Debian one day soon, but I've been threatening that for a while now.That's why I like UNIX so much - it's all about choice. It's actually a good thing having multiple ways of doing something, and having multiple approaches. The fact that you have a choice whether you want to run Debian or not is fantastic.

I've been down numerous building paths for various platforms, the platform that is the worst is AIX. Everything they do is so different - it's painfull just to build 'make'. Forget neato auto-package building tools, this is getting your hands dirty stuff.

glen_ap
06-14-07, 01:12 PM
It's ok these days, but the one thing that debian still needs to work on is downgrading. It's not as simple as 'apt-get uninstall' nor 'apt-get dist-downgrade'. I am sure *you* know this, but for the benefit of others I will clarify. Debian has "apt-get remove --purge" (I prefer "aptitude purge") which will completely remove a package from your system. But downgrading is to go to an older version of a package (or group of packages) and this is not supported. I am not aware of any other Linux's or BSD's that support this functionality either, but that is not a good argument for not having it.

The only package management system that beats Debian hands down is HP-UX's Software Distributor. Upgrade/downgrade as much as you like, rollback patches, re-apply them.That sounds awesome, and I hope we get it one day! I guess that particular issue has not bothered the developers enough to deal with it. If enough people comment on it, then will probably add it. If not, you could always contribute. ;)

I'm bound and determined to live in Debian one day soon, but I've been threatening that for a while now.From what you have posted on this thread thus far, I think you will be happy if/when you do. The community is very helpful. I have never experienced the "elitist" attitude of the Debian folks; and I read/post on linux.debian.user which is supposedly the worst. I also think Debian is easier than most people think. Etch is a major advancement in many areas. I am not, by any means, an advanced Linux user, and I find that Debian just works for me.

mijahe
06-14-07, 06:56 PM
That sounds awesome, and I hope we get it one day! I guess that particular issue has not bothered the developers enough to deal with it.
It is awesome. But, there have been issues with SDUX, but those have only been related to the way in which a package has been constructed, and not related to the package management system. The biggest one was several years back, when some HP jock released a patch that removed the kernel, and THEN REBOOTED!


If enough people comment on it, then will probably add it. If not, you could always contribute. ;)
Yes, well. :o This has been my issue all along. Several years back, back when I was using HPUX10, I was half way through coding the SDUX concept to Linux. But I'm sure you know what ADD is? :) One of these things that stops you from being effective, and stops you from following through.


From what you have posted on this thread thus far, I think you will be happy if/when you do. The community is very helpful. I have never experienced the "elitist" attitude of the Debian folks; and I read/post on linux.debian.user which is supposedly the worst. I also think Debian is easier than most people think. Etch is a major advancement in many areas. I am not, by any means, an advanced Linux user, and I find that Debian just works for me.I agree with this. Ian, try it out in vmware-server. Debian tends to uphold the "Linux way" more than any other distribution, and there aren't too many "elitist" hackers there. As Glen said, Etch is a major advancement. If we were talking about Woody, then forget it, stick with what you know.

There's nothing so good as doing an upgrade in Debian, (from Etch to Lenny):
% perl -p -i -e 's/etch/lenny/g' /etc/apt/sources.list
% apt-get update
% apt-get dist-upgrade

mijahe
06-14-07, 07:03 PM
I am sure *you* know this, but for the benefit of others I will clarify. Debian has "apt-get remove --purge" (I prefer "aptitude purge") which will completely remove a package from your system. But downgrading is to go to an older version of a package (or group of packages) and this is not supported. I am not aware of any other Linux's or BSD's that support this functionality either, but that is not a good argument for not having it.
Interestingly, the way I setup production systems, (regardless of Sun, HP, Linux), is to have two boot/root disks, (and each boot/root can be mirrored as well). Any major upgrade or patching will be done on the current boot/root. If it doesn't work out, I'll reboot on the alternate. Once the upgrade/patch is complete and works well, I'll rsync/mirror back to the backup boot/root. This can save hours of hair-pulling if things don't work out. It's just me I guess - I always want to have a "Plan B", (or in fact a Plan C, D, E, F as well).

jimmo
08-10-07, 02:10 PM
Been using it as my primary work station since about 1996. First it was Caldera, then SUSE. We have both RedHat and SUSE at work. If you are interested in learning Linux, check out The Linux Tutorial (http://www.linux-tutorial.info/).

arkyle
12-11-07, 01:15 AM
I do, and LOVE it 'till dead. I've used OpenSUSE, fedora, I tried red hat enterprice, knoppix, gentoo, and Ubuntu. OpenSUSE was ridiculously stable, but it doesn't manage RAM as well as others. Right now I have ubuntu installed on my dektop and Vista (no option, school software runs on windows) on my laptop. 7.10 rocks, and it's the most stable Ubuntu release to date IMO. The only problem with Ubuntu is that it makes me lazy. I Love Synaptic.

arkyle
01-23-08, 12:36 AM
I installed Xubuntu and it's great! 250 MB of used RAM with three filled desktops, amarok, azureus, pidgin, firefox, synaptic, thunderbird, Pitivi, and two terminals!? WTH?! xfce manages the resources in a way I have never seen before. It's awesome!!!

Guest1
01-23-08, 01:02 AM
not I

lars
01-23-08, 01:47 AM
My brother installed Ubuntu on my other laptop tonight. I had heard about Linux for years, but this was my first exposure to it tonight.

I amazed at how secure it appears, and by how much faster it is than Windows.

nikkiana
01-23-08, 01:47 AM
I have Ubuntu installed on my desktop. Love it.

Luthien
01-23-08, 03:32 AM
I use linux since about 6 years .. mostly debian / ubuntu
-- and osx leopard as well, since last year.

Would not want to use m$ even if they offered me money.

kilted_scotsman
01-23-08, 09:02 AM
Messed with Redhat a few years ago then just didn't have the time for it. All that messing around trying to find which chipset the videocard used and the dark technical details of the monitor you needed to know to get X windows to run.

Now running a firewall on it....if the firewall continues to run well thats fine...if I have to do anything to it...then it's toast...I can't be hassled researching the net to find out what byzantine commands I have to run to find out and fix whats wrong......and of course if my firewalls down...I've no internet access!

It's come a long way in the last few years, but it still needs to polish up it's act. It's all very well to say that its a great system but trying to do something when you're not using it day in day out is a nightmare.

The biggest issue I find is that you have to know what your looking for to find something...which kinda defeats the purpose. It's as if you had to solve an IT problem and all the commands had to be entered in Polish.....there was an English help manual....but it could only be accessed if you knew the Polish command you were looking for information on....and could spell it perfectly..MAN pages anyone?

Linux still hasn't escaped it's UNIX/University computing roots, and it's fantastic strengths are hidden because everythings so obvious to those who use UNIX/Linux every day, and completely incomprehensible to people who don't.

"It's years since I had to rebuild the kernel".....who apart from someone with too much time on their hands or a serious interest in computing ever wanted to have to rebuild a kernel??

kilt

arkyle
01-24-08, 11:40 AM
Linux still hasn't escaped it's UNIX/University computing roots, and it's fantastic strengths are hidden because everythings so obvious to those who use UNIX/Linux every day, and completely incomprehensible to people who don't.

kilt

Well, that's changing with the everex, even with the Eee; and, for example, Ubuntu is waaay easier to use for the average person than Windows is. It made me too lazy XD, I didn't even have to look for programs anymore. Open synaptic, apply, there you have it.

Luthien
01-24-08, 02:36 PM
It made me too lazy XD, I didn't even have to look for programs anymore. Open synaptic, apply, there you have it.

Yeah, that is such a wonderful thing .. apt-get install *whatever*.

Whenever I have to install something on someone's m$ box it is a frustrating experience to find some good, free utility that does the job ... and 90% of what initially looks like free ends up having crippled functionality, nag screens, works for 5 days only or turns out to be something completely different altogether ---> :mad: <--- not to mention the need to have to surf all those crappy sites with horrible flashing advertisements *shiver*

Wild horses could not drag me back to m$. It's patronising, slow, unfriendly, illogic, crippled, no fun at all, corporate, pointy-haired-boss-like (hey, print the internet out for me, will you? Oh wait, make that two copies!), unsafe and a feast for viruses.
Linux is fun, endlessly varied, lets you choose & be in control, inherently safe, friendly, academic, has an incredibly helpful user population.

HighFunctioning
01-24-08, 11:32 PM
Cygwin makes Windows a bit more tolerable in many cases. But then again, that may have something to do with how one uses Linux to begin with.

apt-get on my Debian system has made me quite lazy as well, though it can cause issues at times when upgrading (especially when a new version of a critical application is listed as a dependency of a new version of a certain package, and performing the upgrade destroys the existing configuration). At least it's fairly stable (It has only been running for a short 676+-day stretch without reboot).

blueroo
01-25-08, 12:35 AM
RHEL abd CENTOS are silly. they sell a two year old OS that mostly works with older HP and IBM hardware. They call it "stable" because it is never going to change. People think that means it is better. I'd like to have some of whatever they are smoking......

Yes, I'm replying to a post from last year. Sue me! :)

When you are managing 500 servers, they're all critical, and they all need to be standardized, you begin to appreciate running a distribution that doesn't make a major release every 6 months and stops issuing security updates after a year or two (I'm looking at you, Fedora Core).

Once my server is in production, I want very few changes; security updates, bug fixes, and sometimes performance improvements. No brand new versions, no changes to how init.d works, no new functionality, no anything else. After it's designed and deployed, my operating system should look exactly the same in 3 or 5 years as it does today, and it should be supported too. Redhat Enterprise and CentOS get that. So do IBM, Sun, HP, and Microsoft (to an extent).

mijahe
01-27-08, 06:35 AM
At least it's fairly stable (It has only been running for a short 676+-day stretch without reboot).
I've seen an uptime of 734 days at work. Longest I've ever seen. On a production server too.

HighFunctioning
01-27-08, 12:53 PM
http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/today/top.avg.html

These numbers need to be taken lightly though:
(http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.root102.co.uk - I was unaware that one could upgrade MS windows without rebooting... ;-) )

arkyle
01-30-08, 09:44 AM
Apache on linux. Nice!

pitzeleh8
02-03-08, 01:48 PM
In the past I've used mostly gentoo (which was phenomenal), Debian, Correll, Mandrake, and a few others. Yellow Dog has been great on my old-*** TiBooks. On my g4 mdd wind tunnel I run FC8. I've run and enjoyed Ubuntu and Linux Mint on my MacBook after getting really frustrated with 10.5.1's uber-bugginess. Honestly, the 9a527 build of 10.5 was more stable than 10.5.1; I don't know why. But, I am impatiently awaiting 10.5.2 with its enormous list of bug fixes.

Oh, and I did try eLive's special "MacBook" version, but I really hated it. If I had the time to set up gentoo again, I'd probably still run that exclusively. For better or worse, though, Ubuntu is just too easy to get up and running in a few minutes. And it's very, very stable--although as much as I hate Dead Rat, Fedora Core 8 is really quite sexy as well. Its out-of-the-boxiness might also match Ubuntu's.

EvilSockMonkey
02-03-08, 02:09 PM
Since "Win-doze" is a necessary evil; I have left it on my laptop for the benefit of my wifes sanity. I have Ubuntu on a 80Gb removable USB drive for the benefit of mine.

ESM

EvilSockMonkey
02-03-08, 05:02 PM
Coming back to this thread because the irony was striking:

Does Linux seem like the operating system of choice for ADHD to anyone else?

Consider that like Linux many ADHD folks are very detailed and compartmentalized to their strengths, but can look a shambles to outsiders.

Whereas Windows seems to be the operating system of the masses; is good at a little of everything, but not good at any one thing (including self-management)

So, would it not make sense that Linux is "Win-doze" on {enter stimulant of choice here} Linux is "Win-doze" in ADHD therapy...?

Just rambling; going back up my tree to hang out now....

EHM

Luthien
02-03-08, 05:27 PM
Apart from all the other reasons, one of the things that I really hate about window$ is the feeling of belittlement that it seems to radiate. Like "we know what's good your you". It almost automatically makes me want to revolt and go against it. It is soo totally against everything that is fun and intelligent and responsible. Ugh. Given that ADD-ers are generally individualists, smart and hate being treated like sheep I'd confirm that Linux is very much the ADD os :)

Ian
02-04-08, 12:14 AM
Amen to that. It's a perfect fit for me.

mijahe
02-04-08, 05:37 AM
http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/today/top.avg.html

Cool. 1812 days. I'm surprised to see a Windows box up there as second. Not surprised to see BSD boxes taking up almost all the top places.



These numbers need to be taken lightly though:
(http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.root102.co.uk - I was unaware that one could upgrade MS windows without rebooting... ;-) )
Yeah, wonder exactly how they obtain these uptimes. I suspect that it's rather fudged. Or rather - Windows has less hackers := less chance of someone hacking the uptime := less chance of seeing Windows in the top ranks.

Mind you Solaris is very trivial to hack uptimes, (especially with dtrace).

mijahe
02-04-08, 05:54 AM
Does Linux seem like the operating system of choice for ADHD to anyone else?

Oh yes indeedy! Combine the flexibility and randomness of GNU software as well into the mix and it's an ADDers dream. Choices, choices, choices. Of course only the geeky ADDers - there's a lot of ADDers here on ADDF who are fairly computer illiterate.


Whereas Windows seems to be the operating system of the masses; is good at a little of everything, but not good at any one thing (including self-management)

It's an interesting perspective. However, I think ADD transcends character types. Therefore we have the uber geeky ADDer, and then the "how do I press ctrl-alt-del" ADDer, and the "I can't stand computers" ADDer..... Each type will go for a different O/S based on how their character, (and their ADD), makes them feel comfortable.

For me - there's nothing like a shell. I've been a UNIX hacker from way back, (read 1980 - OK almost way back :-) ), and I can get instant results from what I want to do. However, there is a point where my ADD kicks in, and I can't stand it.

From the other side - I know several people here on ADDF who very much prefer Windows, because it gives them the same 'instant' response. They are not interested in learning how to use a shell - because it's too much trouble. This is where their ADD kicks in.

So, it's largely a mix between character and ADD. I think we tend to characterize ourselves into 'ADD character type' and 'non-ADD character type'. Whereas we are all individuals with different characters - who just so happen to have ADD.

However.... having said all that..... If you are geeky AND you have ADD - then you are more likely to run Linux that Windows.

arkyle
02-04-08, 06:02 PM
Coming back to this thread because the irony was striking:

Does Linux seem like the operating system of choice for ADHD to anyone else?

Consider that like Linux many ADHD folks are very detailed and compartmentalized to their strengths, but can look a shambles to outsiders.


Well, maybe. I like it because I don't have to keep with the masses, there are SOOOO many choices for distros, desktops, I love that. I'm always changing the distros in my machines because I get easily bored with the same one; my desktop pc won't have the same stuff inside for more than 3 months.

Fuse
02-05-08, 07:21 AM
I installed Ubuntu in the middle of last year. I like it.

It makes coding and such easier. Yay for open source!

And **** Vista.

n0ah
02-19-08, 03:14 AM
check out the signature :)

amnorvend
02-19-08, 01:27 PM
I use a Mac and OS X is a Unix. Does that count?

mijahe
02-19-08, 04:13 PM
Sure does. That's what I say to all the Mac users I meet.... "You're a UNIX nerd." :)

Jibber
02-19-08, 09:43 PM
Our IDS (SNORT) that I now oversee as opposed to running uses OpenBSD. I have VMware on my desktop to run various flavors of Linux with security tools on them (I'm a technical security officer). I used to play with and run linux a lot at home as the place I work is a Windows based shop (except for my little IDS), but I no longer have time to play with it.

You want to talk about hyperfocus, I used to work either on an issue or learning something new with Linux and would look up and its 3 or 4 am and I had to be at work at 7. I miss it . . .

HighFunctioning
02-19-08, 11:47 PM
Like "we know what's good your you". It almost automatically makes me want to revolt and go against it. It is soo totally against everything that is fun and intelligent and responsible. Ugh. Given that ADD-ers are generally individualists, smart and hate being treated like sheep I'd confirm that Linux is very much the ADD os :)

This is quite true. Unfortunately, I feel these same constraints with some distributions of Linux also. Surprisingly, unlike some here, I've been sticking to the same two distributions, as others that I've tried (in more of a "lets see what everyone else has to offer" way) seem rather confining (Fedora seemed this way, for example). Slackware (and more recently, Debian) have fullfilled my wants/needs by far in this respect. Essentially, I think this desire is more satisfied by the non-core components more than anything.

Jibber
02-19-08, 11:54 PM
Yep, I've been a big Debian or Debian based fan.

My problem with Windows is that it allows idiots to administer the servers because its a point and click solution. To administer a linux or *nix based server you had better know what you are doing or there will be disaster in the form of downtime; whereas with Windows things will run, but will have HUGE security holes.

mijahe
02-20-08, 04:59 PM
....... seem rather confining (Fedora seemed this way, for example). Slackware (and more recently, Debian) have fullfilled my wants/needs by far in this respect. Essentially, I think this desire is more satisfied by the non-core components more than anything.
I think Debian is a good choice for ADDers. They have practically every free/open source app. in existance, (read: no limitations) and upgrades are as simple as an 'apt-get update; apt-get dist-upgrade', (read: nothing to get in the way of what you really want to do).


My problem with Windows is that it allows idiots to administer the servers because its a point and click solution. To administer a linux or *nix based server you had better know what you are doing or there will be disaster in the form of downtime; whereas with Windows things will run, but will have HUGE security holes.
Both O/S have their advantages and disadvantages: Linux, (aka UNIX), is a stable O/S with choices, but lacks in GUI control. Windows has immense GUI control but lacks in stability, and choices.

Linux will work from the ground up, but Windows will work from the top down. That is; Linux concentrates on getting things working, whereas Windows concentrates on user experience.

Linux will have poor frontends 'cause the coder has spent their time getting the driver working, Windows will have a fantastic user experience, but lacks on coding quality.

DRP on Linux is far easier as all you need to run is a kernel, (loaded up from http, ftp, tftp, disk, cd), and a shell. Windows! Well, you need the whole damned O/S there. Mind you they've gotten around it by using Ghost.

Consequently, the sysadmins for UNIX are very different from Windows sysadmins. UNIX sysadmins have a very steep learning curve up front, but then it's easy going; Windows sysadmins have it easy up front, but then it gets hard. Linux forces you to know what you are doing, whereas Windows says "Don't worry about it - just assume it's working."

Having said that; There's been huge headway made with GNOME, (since I last checked), with the GUI front end. I was pleasantly surprised when I switched to the GNOME desktop, after running XFce for many years. I didn't have to hack config files to get a printer going! WTF! It found my network printer, setup the correct PPD file, and it was there! WTF! Since when has it been that easy under UNIX!? My grandma could do it!

And I also hear that the next invocation of Windows Server will be purely text driven! IE; It'll startup a text console, you'll be able to startup/shutdown apps., edit the registry from a text console. They're finally removing the reliance of the graphics driver out of the kernel, (again - LOL).

Luthien
02-20-08, 05:07 PM
Linux, (aka UNIX), is a stable O/S with choices, but lacks in GUI control. Windows has immense GUI control but lacks in stability, and choices.
I actually think I had more GUI control on linux .. if only for the choice of windowmanager: from minimalistic like er, wossname .. icewm or what have you .. to KDE. And now the OpenGL wm Beryl is way, way, waaayyyy more fancy than vista :cool:

mijahe
02-20-08, 06:50 PM
I actually think I had more GUI control on linux .. if only for the choice of windowmanager: from minimalistic like er, wossname .. icewm or what have you .. to KDE.

Actually I meant 'GUI control' as in usability. M$ has spent $billions on usability studies, so of course, the user experience should be better, (ha ha). It is to an extent - my grandma would be lost on Linux even with a nice WM like KDE or wossname.... (LMAO - love the Pratchett reference.)


And now the OpenGL wm Beryl is way, way, waaayyyy more fancy than vista :cool:
Mmmm, now that I've finally got a PC with a decent 3D card in it, I might investigate a 3D WM. Beryl is a fork of the old compiz innit? Never tried compiz either, but might give it whirl.

HighFunctioning
02-20-08, 09:27 PM
Actually I meant 'GUI control' as in usability. M$ has spent $billions on usability studies, so of course, the user experience should be better, (ha ha). It is to an extent - my grandma would be lost on Linux even with a nice WM like KDE or wossname.... (LMAO - love the Pratchett reference.)

I would think that Linux would be perfectly usable by most if it were used more like a kiosk (i.e. access a web browser, check your mail, etc). But anything beyond that would be difficult. Buy a printer? The average user could set one up on Windows, but likely not on Linux.

arkyle
02-20-08, 11:15 PM
I would think that Linux would be perfectly usable by most if it were used more like a kiosk (i.e. access a web browser, check your mail, etc). But anything beyond that would be difficult. Buy a printer? The average user could set one up on Windows, but likely not on Linux.

In windows I had to look for the driver for my printer and ended up using the CD. Ubuntu, Xubuntu and OpenSUSE didn't have a problem with the two printers and an all-in-one I've plugged in. Only OpenSUSE opened YaSt in order to install the driver; automatically. It all depends on the distro. Now it is even harder to install that RAM hungry cube in windows than start using the bundled Compiz Fusion in Ubuntu.

n0ah
02-21-08, 01:07 AM
HighFunctioning (http://www.addforums.com/forums/member.php?u=814) omg you have got to be kididng me :)

you have a picture with the plan9 bunny on it. that's really quite insane. i'd reckon alot of these people here talking about linux have no idea what that is :P

plan9++ dude, that r0x0rz

mijahe
02-21-08, 01:53 AM
(http://www.addforums.com/forums/member.php?u=814)
i'd reckon alot of these people here talking about linux have no idea what that is :P

Be careful not to assume.

Luthien
02-21-08, 02:15 AM
Beryl is a fork of the old compiz innit?
:) .. I think that, in good OSS fashion, compiz has forked, merged, reforked, and remerged a couple of times now. I think the current incarnation is indeed Beryl ...

you have a picture with the plan9 bunny on it. that's really quite insaneYes. Quite a hoopy frood, that mod .. he sure knows where his towel is.

plan9++ dude, that r0x0rzMr. Jelly! Mr. Jelly! Error at Address Number 6, Treacle Mine Road.
Melon melon melon
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error. Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

mijahe
02-21-08, 02:32 AM
Mr. Jelly! Mr. Jelly! Error at Address Number 6, Treacle Mine Road.
Melon melon melon
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error. Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

LOL

+++ Out of Cheese Error +++

n0ah
02-24-08, 12:03 AM
heh, yea i mean who ever said not to uninstall the world everytime...

HighFunctioning
02-24-08, 12:25 AM
Actually, I think I need to find a better picture of a trail (a.k.a. rabbit trail). The overall significance of that signature (dare I say 9signature?) image has little to do with the Plan 9 OS, other than that I used Glenda as opposed to other possible creatures. The choice of Glenda vs. others was mainly due to one of my previous avatars being Glenda also, making the signature recognizable to others as probably being mine. No... there's a reason why I'm obsessed with that image, and I'm not exactly sure why.

It's been speculated that Glenda was the childhood imaginary friend of another moderator here. :-)

mijahe
02-24-08, 07:15 AM
It's been speculated that Glenda was the childhood imaginary friend of another moderator here. :-)
Now you have us wondering.

Fuse
02-28-08, 05:53 AM
Do network admins normally enable or disable port 22?

HighFunctioning
02-28-08, 07:10 AM
Do network admins normally enable or disable port 22?

I would think that they would usually enable it, unless there is no reason to do so (i.e. one never wants to remotely log in). I keep the port open so that I can access my system remotely. However, my system requires that one use a one-time password when accessing from outside of my local network. I also have denyhosts set up so that those who try to brute force their way in are blocked after so many failures to log in correctly. Disabling direct root log-ins is generally a good idea, as it forces one to log in as a normal user initially (with a name that is not so easy to predict, whereas "root" is almost always present).

mijahe
02-28-08, 04:56 PM
Do network admins normally enable or disable port 22?
It depends on your requirements. In a corporate setting we disable all outbound and inbound 22 - because it's a security risk. Why outbound? Because all you need is a server on the internet that supports port forwarding, and you can setup your own tunneling, (even setup a VPN).

So your question is too broad. Yes - for anything they don't trust. No - for anything they do trust. Which is the basic rule of thumb for network security. A network becomes 'untrusted' when you have no control over any point of the link. Even if it's a tiny segment hop, or router.

On my local internet connection you won't see anything open - but that's because I obfuscate my inbound connections. I go to the extent of changing my TCP/IP stack so that normal inbound connections won't work. That combined with port knocking, IP restrictions, and time of day access works wonders. HF's method is just as valid - he's just taken a different route to do the same thing.

Remember: The only network secure computer is one that's turned off, and unplugged. A security system is an insurance policy only. That is: You always implement a security system to the level of data you want to protect. Banks have filthy security to the point of isolating areas of control, (only group A has control over routers, group B has control over passwords, group C has control over firewalls). On the other hand a small time company will probably even allow inbound/outbound SSH.

Fuse
02-28-08, 11:27 PM
Hmm. Thanks guys. I'll check on Monday I guess. I'll set-up an SSH server on my comp anyway (cygwin openssh). It seems secure enough for my purposes.

My aim is to bypass the firewall (blocks on IRC, MSN, a restrictive web filter, etc) at college by tunnelling to this computer at home.

mijahe
02-29-08, 07:10 AM
Ah! I see!. Well, if you have an admin worth his salt, he'll have blocked outbound ssh. If you have an uber-geek admin he will also have blocked outbound SSL connections to unknown IPs, (the 'ol CONNECT method via proxy loop-hole).

Just google for ssh https tunnel. It works on the premise that you have ssh listening on your home 'puter at port 443. I'll leave the rest to you....... :)

AnalogDog
02-29-08, 05:54 PM
I ran Linux at home, figuring it out with the help of the web and listservers from 2000 to 2007.

I could not stay away from upgrading my desktop or trying to make my system more automatic. Heck, I would have liked to get it to reply to all my email, and post to the forums. In 2007 I realized that I was an upgrade junky and constantly worked to figure everything out. It became my obsession.

I have hated M$ since Win98 Update #2, when MS integrated IE into the OS. Personally, I would rather not run Windows (its boring, stupid, and useless) but I don't mess with it much at all, and I can leave the computer sometimes running WinSnooze.

I am still a FOSS fanatic, and prefer Open Office, The Gimp, Audacity, Firefox, Thunderbird, Sunbird and a ton of ported software. I am slow to go back to buying software, and am always looking for free software to do the job. It seems that free software and purchased software both can be truly crummy. I have now purchased things that are just terrible, and lost money on it.

After Linux it really feels weird to me running Winders. Its almost like going back to kindergarten. But I do leave this computer so I can get back to real life.

Rob

Fuse
02-29-08, 09:29 PM
I must admit, I do notice significant inferiority in Windows XP when I try to do anything via command line (ls - command not found).

But it's still infinitely better than Vista.

Jibber
03-01-08, 12:02 AM
I must admit, I do notice significant inferiority in Windows XP when I try to do anything via command line (ls - command not found).

But it's still infinitely better than Vista.
Try CygWin:
It gives you a bit of a shell . . .

And for Windows server 2003 there is something called Power Shell that is supposed to give more freedom to the command line. but, I've never tried this.

CygWin is pretty cool though, and ls works! :cool:

Luthien
03-01-08, 05:12 AM
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/sandwich.png

arkyle
03-01-08, 05:50 PM
ROFLMAO!
That pic owns! :D

blueroo
03-28-08, 06:13 PM
Hmm. Thanks guys. I'll check on Monday I guess. I'll set-up an SSH server on my comp anyway (cygwin openssh). It seems secure enough for my purposes.

My aim is to bypass the firewall (blocks on IRC, MSN, a restrictive web filter, etc) at college by tunnelling to this computer at home.

Not that I would ever condone bypassing network security, but OpenVPN allows you to use an HTTP/SSL proxy to connect to outbound servers. ;)

Ian
03-29-08, 04:08 AM
Ah the sweet freedom of choice. Yum.

Katja
04-05-08, 08:40 AM
I've used Ubuntu for about a year. I have a dualboot (with Windows) set up, but I make use of it maybe once every month or two, for five minutes.

ADB1
04-05-08, 09:06 PM
I've used Ubuntu for about a year. I have a dualboot (with Windows) set up, but I make use of it maybe once every month or two, for five minutes.

Interesting. I have never really warmed to dual boot - if I want ot do something on the other system I want to do it NOW (say that louder __NOW__) not wait 5 mins and interrupt waht I am doing.

My son runs Ubuntu on top of XP usung VMWare. I have tried (I think) Mandrake on top of MS virtual machine and it didn't work - can't recall details.

I'd quite like to run OpenSolaris on a VM to get more experienec but suffer from a "round tuit shortage".:(

mijahe
04-05-08, 10:48 PM
I'd quite like to run OpenSolaris on a VM to get more experienec but suffer from a "round tuit shortage".:(

I have lots of spare "round tuits", trouble is I use them for things that I shouldn't be doing. :D

Have a look at the prebuilt VMWare images (http://vmware.com/appliances/) from vmware - saves a LOT of hassle up front. Just download and run.

ADB1
04-06-08, 03:07 AM
I have lots of spare "round tuits", trouble is I use them for things that I shouldn't be doing. :D
Can you send one my way - I only need one :o
Have a look at the prebuilt VMWare images (http://vmware.com/appliances/) from vmware - saves a LOT of hassle up front. Just download and run.
I am confused by the freeness or otherwise of VMWARE. The VMSWARE server product appears to be free, but workstation ones has to to be paid for. We would be talking here about commercial use - training within my job so I am wary of getting into trouble. But I would be unlikely to get sign off to pay from VMWARE.

mijahe
04-06-08, 07:48 AM
I am confused by the freeness or otherwise of VMWARE. The VMSWARE server product appears to be free, but workstation ones has to to be paid for. We would be talking here about commercial use - training within my job so I am wary of getting into trouble. But I would be unlikely to get sign off to pay from VMWARE.
Have a look at VMWare player (http://vmware.com/products/player/). You can use it in a corporate setting.

If you use VMWare server (http://vmware.com/products/server/), make sure you use the version 1.0.x series, (1.0.5 is the latest), and not 2.0 beta. That version is very much classed as bloatware, and there have been many complaints about it.

I use both extensively at work.

d2k1
08-12-08, 12:24 AM
I'm been using fedora for personal use for five years now. During my first two linux years I don't think I even touched a windows machine. Now I use both with a nifty kvm setup. I occasionally use my windows box for web browsing but mostly for graphics work.

kimfar
08-29-08, 04:21 PM
Dual boot Suze and Vista (hate Vista). All my finances are done on Linux. Open Source = Freedom.

nomADD
09-13-08, 10:46 PM
I generally run something based on Debian or Slackware. Currently using SimplyMepis.

gnbeg
01-30-09, 04:47 PM
Umm... I can open a terminal window running bash using my Macbook (Mac OS X v10.5), does that count? :)

Ian
01-30-09, 05:18 PM
Umm... I can open a terminal window running bash using my Macbook (Mac OS X v10.5), does that count? :)

Do you like penguins? ;):eyebrow::eyebrow:

Luthien
01-30-09, 08:51 PM
Umm... I can open a terminal window running bash using my Macbook (Mac OS X v10.5), does that count? :)

I've got one too, and for me it does :)
Maybe there is a list somewhere where it says something to the effect that you do not only need to open the terminal, but also enter some commands in it ... like

doriath:~ luthien$ whoami
luthien
doriath:~ luthien $

or

doriath:~ luthien $ vim hello
{...}
doriath:~ luthien $ chmod +x hello
doriath:~ luthien $ ./hello
Good day my dear user! I do hope that your day has been wonderful until now and continues in the same spirit! What can this humble macbook do for you?
doriath:~ luthien $

Who said that the command line is no fun? :cool:

Contrast
03-20-09, 10:32 AM
I switch between FreeBSD and Backtrack, I prefer backtrack because I like to boot up with usb.

psychun
03-28-09, 09:10 PM
I have used Fedora 2,3,4. Then I discovered SuSE/KDE and stuck to it for about 4 years. However KDE 4 has spoilt my user experience( seems too slow on my 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo, 4GB RAM, 128MB Graphics memory machine). Now I use Ubuntu and some times LinuxMint and am happy as never before.

hermitpermit
03-28-09, 09:59 PM
I use Linux Mint. Its pretty nice, except it comes with this glitch where youtube sometimes doesn't work.

tthordarson
08-26-09, 05:04 PM
I used to do that on and off, until the latest release of Ubuntu was a flop and the Windows 7 Beta came and for the first time in my life I see Microsoft make a operating system that can be used(I can even say it's good)!!! But now I'm hoping for Google OS to be a success, and then I'm back into the world of Linux :D

fraa
09-07-09, 09:08 AM
I've been using Linux for a few years now, I'm currently on Arch.

NekoGirl
09-11-09, 11:38 PM
I'm afraid of commitment; I've only done Knoppix really.

Makes a great rescue disk, too. I once created a password for my account in Windows and promptly forgot it, and used Knoppix to hack back into my own damn computer. Doh!

innaminute
09-16-09, 08:24 PM
Yay Linux!

I've been using it for about 10 years now. I'll switch distros at the drop of a hat. Sometimes I get bored and I'll go over to distrowatch.com to see if there's anything new. Then I'll end up installing a new distro at 9:30pm when I wanted to be in bed by 10:30. I guess there's some impulsiveness, eh?

I've used...
Red Hat (before it was Fedora)
Mandrake (before it was Mandriva)
Gentoo (that really taught me the most)
Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu/etc., etc., etc.
Sidux (debian based on the sid repo)
Fedora (running 11 on my desktop and work PC)
Slackware
Zenwalk (slackware based)
Vector
Mint (running that dual boot on my laptop as we speak)

Another one that looks interesting is Sabayon, which is Gentoo based.

Gosh, I just realized I have no life.

Uh, I guess I'll go back to watching TV/Surfing the Internet/Coding.

unthought
09-16-09, 08:47 PM
Not a fan of Linux on the desktop at all. User interface is worse, sluggish, full of crap, non standardized. . very little quality applications, no support from commercial/professional software developers. That said I've ran Redhat, and Gentoo a few times. Gentoo was my favorite for getting real exposure to Linux. I compiled it all from scratch and did all my own installation for drivers, tweaked the kernel, etc. Ran like junk after all that, better off with prebuilt distros. I have shell accounts on servers that run FreeBSD and similar, which have been great for hosting IRC and things like that. My newest VPS will run Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise, and if I need to run *nix I'll install the Services for Unix subsystem included with all highend versions of Windows. Then if that doesn't work, I'll run CentOS or FreeBSD in virtualization in Windows. OS of choice on my desktop right now is Windows 7 Enterprise RTM and Windows Server 2008 R2.

derpderp
09-30-09, 02:18 PM
Got FreeBSD on my laptop, but not on my PC, I don't want to be spending hours dicking around so I can play video games so I just stick with windows on my desktop.

I love running BSD on my laptop though, I've tried OpenSuse and Ubuntu on my other computers in the past but I didn't really liked either, but as soon as I started running BSD I fell in love, it's very stable and the port system is great but it would be nice if it had more hardware support.

romeosidvicious
10-09-09, 10:55 AM
OK I haven't read the whole thread yet but I will right after I post this. I was really excited to see this thread! I am a Linux nerd for a living. My title is HPC Engineer and I sit on the standards board for a major oil and gas company. That should mean I focus of High Performance Computing Clusters but in reality I develop solutions for everything from hosted desktops to full site, bare metal to production, deployment solutions, some web development (I learned PHP over the last six months), desktop builds to licensing server, and every once in a while I get to play with cluster stuff. The company I am with is stuck on Rocks 4.3 so I rarely get to play with anything cool and shiny in that realm. I do get to go to SC09 this year, trip already booked, and I am stoked about that.

I have been doing Linux in the corporate space since 1999 and playing with it at home for longer than that. I run Ubuntu for desktops at home and work, UNR Karmic Koala on my netbook, and am intimately familiar with RHEL and SLE* for servers and desktops. I could go on forever but I really should go read the whole thread now. I just want to say how awesome it is to find this thread on this forum...

really
10-09-09, 11:54 AM
Gentoo trounces Ubuntu. And Ubuntu rocks as it is.

romeosidvicious
10-09-09, 12:11 PM
Gentoo trounces Ubuntu. And Ubuntu rocks as it is.
I used to use Gentoo and have even completely rolled my own distro but these things don't excite me anymore so I stopped. I use Ubuntu because it works out of the box on 90% of the hardware I drop it on and that way all of my work environments are the same. :)

ZiggyFry
12-13-09, 10:54 PM
I like to play a lot with different distributions. My main computer dual boots windows xp (for games) and linux mint which is what I'm almost always using. I've got opensuse on the computer I experiment on. I also have ubuntu on my netbook.

Although I've been a fan of ubuntu, I tried opensuse's new release and I like it a lot, so I'm considering switching over to that.

I'm building a new computer, and I'm planning on putting windows 7 (games, of course) and probably opensuse.

I was happy to see a linux thread :D

Sin.Ziggy.

formax
12-14-09, 02:11 PM
I have a love-hate relationship with Linux. I install it on my workstation, work on it for 4 months, become frustrated by constantly having to alter configuration files in a texteditor. Then I trow it of and install Windows as my main desktop environment. Until a couple of months later I am frustrated by the many hick-ups etc...

That cycle has more or less taken me trough all sorts of linux flavors from Red Hat Linux 7 OpenSuse, Ubuntu, Mint to Fedora and back.

Since several years I have dual, triple or quadruple boots on laptops so I switch between OS'es depending on my mood. Or I just use vmware or virtualbox to emulate environments when performance isn't an issue.the

But as stated before, as much as I like the idea of open source software ā la Inkscape or Gimp I can't seem to get used to working with them. The interfaces are off, shortcuts and menu's are often configured in non-logical manners, which in the end only brings down productivity. And as is often the problem with os software, the funds are lacking to work out those (be it small) bumps. The foundation is usually there but or the interface sucks or the usability sucks or the configuration sucks. I'll stop my rant now.

Winston_Smith
05-11-10, 05:14 PM
I've used Linux as my main OS for the past 2 years or so. I'd fooled around with Linux before, Red Hat and Suse. Then I found Ubuntu and installed that, I used Ubuntu for about 3-4 months then tried a few others. Ended up running Gentoo for about 6 months, then switched the Mint and that's what I'm running as I type this.

Werl
05-19-10, 11:05 PM
I have linux on my parallelsŪ.

String
05-20-10, 12:54 PM
Linux tinkering engages my ADHD brain. I also love the speed, the freedom, and the political/economic model of open source. I've used many distros during the last half dozen years. Currently running Kubuntu.

silverraindog
01-02-11, 02:50 PM
i know this thread is old but i run at home

ubuntu for desktop, freebsd 9 (mistake of upgrading) for servers and an install of gentoo :) and for work, i have ubuntu on my desktop and redhat enterprise linux for servers and centos

Ian
01-02-11, 03:14 PM
I've migrated to Debian (lenny). I'm so happy to be free! :*)

nomannomad
01-02-11, 05:09 PM
Haha, another Linux user here.

I use Ubuntu with a minimal installation. I just picked components and added as I have needed them. Mostly I work in Fluxbox, not Gnome.

I think there is an ADHD component to this. It is like my Ubuntu customization is like perfecting what I started working with 15 years ago. It is just second nature and so is less distracting.

Ian
01-02-11, 05:18 PM
Haha, another Linux user here.

I use Ubuntu with a minimal installation. I just picked components and added as I have needed them. Mostly I work in Fluxbox, not Gnome.

I think there is an ADHD component to this. It is like my Ubuntu customization is like perfecting what I started working with 15 years ago. It is just second nature and so is less distracting.

I've run *nix exclusively as a desktop since January 2001. In the beginning it was a huge distraction. Now, not so much and even less so that Debian is so low maintenance. Fluxbox is my standard GUI environment.

I-Ubuntu
01-02-11, 05:23 PM
See the username.

I use Windows XP SP3 for work stuff on my laptop. Once work is done I reboot to Ubuntu. Been using it for 3 years and have been very happy with it. It does have a pleasant "fiddle factor" to it. Also, if you want to do a re-install it's a HECk of a lot easier than a Windows upgrade.

All the Best!

Ian
01-02-11, 05:30 PM
See the username.

I use Windows XP SP3 for work stuff on my laptop. Once work is done I reboot to Ubuntu. Been using it for 3 years and have been very happy with it. It does have a pleasant "fiddle factor" to it. Also, if you want to do a re-install it's a HECk of a lot easier than a Windows upgrade.

All the Best!

Reinstall? Save me. ;) That's what motivated me to move from winduhs in the first place. Now that I run Debian it simply migrates to the next version of Lenny through the updates. I'm in heaven.

The kids have an XP box, but it's never online and has run flawlessly.

tipoo
01-02-11, 05:56 PM
Running Ubuntu 10.10, dual booting with Win7. I love it. I like how you can customize literally everything if you know what you are doing. It feels faster on equivalent hardware than Windows or even OSX, and you don't have to worry about malware. Startup time is less than 14 seconds on my average-specced laptop, which is insane.

qinkin
01-02-11, 06:28 PM
Dual booting sounds fun..

How do you determine which freeware OS goes best w/which hardware?

My OS is XP profressional currently. What is the freeware equivalent?

My computer is a Dell Optiplex GX520

Linux and such: I mean they aren't impervious, they just aren't as popular therefore most viruses are not designed for them, which is what I've heard.

tipoo
01-02-11, 06:46 PM
Dual booting sounds fun..

How do you determine which freeware OS goes best w/which hardware?

My OS is XP profressional currently. What is the freeware equivalent?

My computer is a Dell Optiplex GX520

Linux and such: I mean they aren't impervious, they just aren't as popular therefore most viruses are not designed for them, which is what I've heard.


Ubuntu will work fine on that system. You can download the installer, mount it with PowerISO or burn it to a CD, and it will take care of the dual booting with the Windows installation. When you open the installer it will give you an option for how much space the Ubuntu part of your hard drive can take.

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download

You may also want to try out Jolicloud, its built for netbooks but it also works well on older/slower systems like that.



Just out of curiousity, what are the full hardware specifications? They update the components over time so just saying the system name doesn't tell us everything. For example my Studio 15 came with a Core 2 Duo, but you can get it with an i7 now.

qinkin
01-02-11, 07:59 PM
I dunno, I'm considering upgrading to the max amount of memory the motherboard can use- 4Gb. (2GB on each of the 2 slots). . I realize Xp-32 bit doesn't recognize that much, right? But will it still be affecting performance invisibly? What about that freeware OS?..

I have:

1Gb DDR2 SDRAM
IntelŪ PentiumŪ 4 Processor
Mini tower form factor

Everything else is pretty much not that significant, for what you need to know, right?

http://www.dell.com/downloads/global/products/optix/en/spec_optix_gx520-gx620_en.pdf

tipoo
01-02-11, 08:02 PM
XP 32 bit will be able to use ~3.7GB of that RAM, sometimes a bit more sometimes a bit less. I highly recommended getting 3GB, having only 1 is a pain in this day and age.

Changing OS's won't let you use more RAM since your hardware only supports 32 bit, but I think 3GB is plenty for you and most people.

qinkin
01-02-11, 08:14 PM
I hear ya.

--but my computer uses dual channeled memory so apparently it's recommended that I use identical RAM in each slot.

They don't make a 1.5 GB slot card right?

tipoo
01-02-11, 09:27 PM
So get 4GB, you will still be able to use most of it.

huntley
01-02-11, 09:51 PM
I use a mac[book pro] for almost all of my work, but I have a Debian distro with a KDE GUI running my apache web server. I used to be pretty Linux/BSD obsessed ten years ago though.

I don't use Windows anywhere (except virtually using parallels when I need to) and unix everywhere (:

bof00
01-03-11, 12:56 PM
I work mainly with 3D graphics so Windows is a must for mostly all applications there (Windows 7 64-bit with an i7 975 extreme and 12GB tripple channel RAM in a laptop :D).
I run Ubuntu 10 and BackTrack 4 though, and OSX also, at home.
I've also run Red Hat, Debian, Mandrake, and CentOS Linux distros in the past, and FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Irix, and Solaris.

tipoo
01-03-11, 12:57 PM
I work mainly with 3D graphics so Windows is a must for mostly all applications there (Windows 7 64-bit with an i7 975 extreme and 12GB tripple channel RAM in a laptop :D).
I run Ubuntu 10 and BackTrack 4 though, and OSX also, at home.


Damn, what laptop is that? Must be a workstation?

bof00
01-03-11, 01:12 PM
Damn, what laptop is that? Must be a workstation?

A Sager (Clevo based) desktop replacement workstation here:
http://www.sagernotebook.com/index.php?page=product_customed&model_name=NP7280
Now has the 980X - people don't usually believe some laptop have desktop processors.

nomannomad
01-04-11, 08:36 AM
A Sager (Clevo based) desktop replacement workstation here:
http://www.sagernotebook.com/index.php?page=product_customed&model_name=NP7280
Now has the 980X - people don't usually believe some laptop have desktop processors.

How long have you had your Sager/Clevo? I had one a few years ago and I think because it was sold with desktop specs. (fast RAM, fast processor, fast HDD) it died an early death.

For me, part of the appeal of Linux is that I can use old hardware, where others have done the 'testing' work of putting in millions of hours so I know what lasts and what doesn't. And because it is old, I also will be sure all the drivers exist. My current laptop is a Panasonic Toughbook CF-73, slower than my old Sager, but I don't worry about its coming apart.

bof00
01-04-11, 10:50 AM
How long have you had your Sager/Clevo? I had one a few years ago and I think because it was sold with desktop specs. (fast RAM, fast processor, fast HDD) it died an early death.

For me, part of the appeal of Linux is that I can use old hardware, where others have done the 'testing' work of putting in millions of hours so I know what lasts and what doesn't. And because it is old, I also will be sure all the drivers exist. My current laptop is a Panasonic Toughbook CF-73, slower than my old Sager, but I don't worry about its coming apart.

Not long - almost a year. I had it shutting off after about 12 straight hours of rendering, due to a safety mechanism from the processor temperature going to high - it was monitored. Now it has diamond compound for the thermal paste and a laptop cooler it sits on with a 10" fan drawing all the hot air out - doesn't get higher than 77 C now (was going between 90-100 C before). Other people have problems with high temps too - that could certainly have caused yours to die.

I don't run Linux on the Sager, I run it on an Asus gaming laptop, and iMac as a virtual machine. I only have an issue with one driver and that is the wireless capability on the network card on the iMac with BackTrack 4 - it's a known incapability.

What do you need a toughbook for? Work in construction? On safari? Ever drop it? :)

nomannomad
01-04-11, 01:43 PM
Not long - almost a year. I had it shutting off after about 12 straight hours of rendering, due to a safety mechanism from the processor temperature going to high - it was monitored. Now it has diamond compound for the thermal paste and a laptop cooler it sits on with a 10" fan drawing all the hot air out - doesn't get higher than 77 C now (was going between 90-100 C before). Other people have problems with high temps too - that could certainly have caused yours to die.

I don't run Linux on the Sager, I run it on an Asus gaming laptop, and iMac as a virtual machine. I only have an issue with one driver and that is the wireless capability on the network card on the iMac with BackTrack 4 - it's a known incapability.

What do you need a toughbook for? Work in construction? On safari? Ever drop it? :)

Ok. It was just experience that as good as the Sager was while running, it seemed to peter out because of heat. It used to cook the thermal paste...

After a few bad laptop experiences, I settled on the Toughbook (not the toughest of their line) as something that would reduce the big danger of mobile computing, sudden catastrophic failure. My Sager stopped working at Laguardia once when I had a deadline...My Toughbook just makes me feel more at ease with working wherever I want to be, though I still avoid very dusty situations and work with a cooling pad.

itsanADHDthing
01-06-11, 09:41 PM
I am not familiar at all with linux.

itsanADHDthing
01-06-11, 09:51 PM
interesting fact.. more iphones than linux


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/Operating_system_usage_share.svg

tipoo
01-06-11, 09:53 PM
interesting fact.. more iphones than linux


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/Operating_system_usage_share.svg

iOS also includes iPod Touch's, but yeah Linux is still pretty obscure for home users. Its a different story for servers and supercomputers though, over 91% of supercomputers use Linux

http://www.top500.org/stats/list/35/osfam

zoomman
08-26-12, 12:40 PM
Back in when I was rattling around these forums in '08, I remember a linux thread. Maybe it was this one. Anyway, I tossed Windows with the advent of Vista and I've never looked back. I'm no techie guy, no linux guru. just a guy that loves the power, versatility, and liberty of linux. ]

I run Linux Mint 10 (Julia) on my Dell Inspiron 2200 laptop, and Linux Mint Debian Edition XFCE on both my IBM ThinkCentre and ThinkPad.

I'm now a member of EFF, FSF, and donate to half-a-dozen FOSS projects. The tipping point for linux will be in its documentation, I think. The more accessible and immediately usable that Linux flavors become, the more readily it will be adopted by others.

Ian
08-26-12, 09:43 PM
Ah... the dark side. :*) :goodpost:

Electra2
08-26-12, 09:47 PM
I use Fedora.I love it.I can`t remeber ever letting me down since I installed it. <3

Slo-mo a-go-go
08-26-12, 11:04 PM
have and will continue to be a linux user and lover- i am very into its ability to run quickly on older out-of-date machines, my laptop from 1999 runs flawlessly with only 128mb ram, but i broke the power cord again, as i fell asleep while using gimping my comic panel---slipped off the back of the bed-- but it's a rock.

zoomman
08-28-12, 06:01 PM
have and will continue to be a linux user and lover- i am very into its ability to run quickly on older out-of-date machines, my laptop from 1999 runs flawlessly with only 128mb ram, but i broke the power cord again, as i fell asleep while using gimping my comic panel---slipped off the back of the bed-- but it's a rock.
My think pad (named Harper) has a mongrel power jack. The original one fell apart and the new one was cobbled together from a box of such pieces accumulated over years of careful jack & power supply hoarding. :D

Slo-mo, waddya running on that 128mb machine? I used to run a flux-box flavor of PCLOS on a 128 Dell desktop from 1998, or some such.

zoomman
08-28-12, 06:02 PM
I use Fedora.I love it.I can`t remeber ever letting me down since I installed it. <3

I've looked at a number of Fedora releases, (I think the last one was 11?) but never installed it, don't know why, come to think of it. Maybe it was always a bit much for my old boxes. What do you run it on Electra?

dragokatzov
08-28-12, 11:25 PM
I use to on a daily basis. Now not so much, though I do have Xubuntu installed on my computer to play around with from time to time

zoomman
08-30-12, 05:51 PM
I ran Xubuntu 9.04 (?) for a long time, and only recently replaced it with Linux Mint 10 xfce, but then gutted that box for parts on Alice (another box running LXDE).

Electra2
08-30-12, 07:10 PM
I've looked at a number of Fedora releases, (I think the last one was 11?) but never installed it, don't know why, come to think of it. Maybe it was always a bit much for my old boxes. What do you run it on Electra?

Hm, Its a Toshiba laptop, But I consider to installert it on my old wkn xp too :) I used too Have Ubuntu too, But I could it bryter go use gnome then the newer unity, so I use fedora. I allso had Debian in the past, a it was good an stable,but I find fedora exellent for soo many reasons! :)

zoomman
08-31-12, 07:56 PM
Hm, Its a Toshiba laptop, But I consider to installert it on my old wkn xp too :) I used too Have Ubuntu too, But I could it bryter go use gnome then the newer unity, so I use fedora. I allso had Debian in the past, a it was good an stable,but I find fedora exellent for soo many reasons! :)
Thanks for responding Electra! Which Fedora are you currently using? (I have a chance to get an IBM T60 Thinkpad for $250, and I'm intrigued about a Fedora install)

Electra2
09-01-12, 10:23 PM
lets see...
kernel Linux 2.6.35.14-106 fc14i686
Gnome 2.32.0

:)

Electra2
09-01-12, 10:29 PM
lets see...
kernel Linux 2.6.35.14-106 fc14i686
Gnome 2.32.0
Fedora 16...I think,I forgot.
I have changed back and foward between distros so many times.
:)

rickymooston
09-01-12, 11:43 PM
All I want to know is who uses Linux here.

I did at work

zoomman
09-05-12, 07:55 PM
I have changed back and foward between distros so many times.
:)

:cool:

Me too! I've finally settled on partitioning all my disks with an OS partition and a separate Data partition (and of course Swap). I save all my work on the Data partition (kinda like /home, but without all the other hidden files) and just do a clean install of whatever distro I'm gonna use.

Ubuntu 8.8.04 was my first install on that old Dell laptop, and I"ve since had several Ubuntus, Simply Mepis, PCLOS KDE and Fluxbox, two OpenSuses, and two Linux Mints.

I downloaded Fedora 17 with Gnome 3xx on it. Pretty, if a bit awkward.

Slo-mo a-go-go
09-05-12, 11:04 PM
My think pad (named Harper) has a mongrel power jack. The original one fell apart and the new one was cobbled together from a box of such pieces accumulated over years of careful jack & power supply hoarding. :Dlove to hear that!! i have my own supply of carefully harvested power supply parts myself too! unfortunately this pwr adptr was already a patchwork of such parts.


-mo, waddya running on that 128mb machine? I used to run a flux-box flavor of PCLOS on a 128 Dell desktop from 1998, or some such. i usually can ramble on my distos but w/out my daily time w/ little laptop, it's just poofs out of my head. i can tell you i started out with puppy linux but when i tried xubuntu i knew i had the perfect match for that machine.

have to now google flux-box and PCLOS to refresh my linux-ish, but real glad to hear you're using a flintstone laptop too!

zoomman
09-08-12, 10:43 AM
love to hear that!! i have my own supply of carefully harvested power supply parts myself too! unfortunately this pwr adptr was already a patchwork of such parts.


i usually can ramble on my distos but w/out my daily time w/ little laptop, it's just poofs out of my head. i can tell you i started out with puppy linux but when i tried xubuntu i knew i had the perfect match for that machine.

have to now google flux-box and PCLOS to refresh my linux-ish, but real glad to hear you're using a flintstone laptop too!

I'm a huge XFCE fan. I used to like Gnome, but Gnome 3, like KDE 4, is less convenient than its earlier incarnations. What I called, PCLOS is misleading, sorry. That was my shorthand for PCLinuxOS (http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=pclinuxos), which longer name I'd entirely forgotten.

Here's a pic I took of that desktop.
http://www.addforums.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=52&pictureid=10289

I've never put that much effort into customizing a desktop before or since, but I was proud enough to take a picture of it. And to be fair, the wallpaper was created by another person, I found it online and used gimp to replace a nifty Maori graphic in the central circle with the Fluxbox bird-thing emblem.

Electra2
10-09-12, 02:28 PM
I know Have installed Linux Mint - Maya-on my thinkpad :)
Everything works like a charm except the wi-fi.

SweetCode
10-09-12, 03:13 PM
I know Have installed Linux Mint - Maya-on my thinkpad :)
Everything works like a charm except the wi-fi.

What is the wifi card? have you tried ndiswrapper?

Electra2
10-11-12, 11:43 AM
What is the wifi card? have you tried ndiswrapper?

http://tsrtesttest.appspot.com/wiki/Lenovo%20T60%20Wireless%20on%20Linux%20Mint%20Debi an%20Edition
Thank you :grouphug:
I used this page and that solved the whole problem!
No it works like a charm period :cool::yes:

zoomman
11-11-12, 09:03 PM
http://tsrtesttest.appspot.com/wiki/Lenovo%20T60%20Wireless%20on%20Linux%20Mint%20Debi an%20Edition
Thank you :grouphug:
I used this page and that solved the whole problem!
No it works like a charm period :cool::yes:
Yay Electra2!!

Which desktop didja choose, if ya don't mind my asking? Cinnamon or Mate (or xfce or other?)

Btw, I ditched LMDE and installed straight Maya XFCE edition. Happy mousy!

Electra2
11-13-12, 07:54 AM
Yay Electra2!!

Which desktop didja choose, if ya don't mind my asking? Cinnamon or Mate (or xfce or other?)

Btw, I ditched LMDE and installed straight Maya XFCE edition. Happy mousy!

Cool :cool:
I use Mate :)
I very happy with it exept it hangs up so if I play a youtube video and a dude in there says "and I was making a loop" the computer sometimes makes it "and I was making a loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop loop " :rolleyes: :giggle:

Subtract81
11-13-12, 10:51 AM
Mint is mint!

Electra2
11-13-12, 05:20 PM
Mint is mint!

lol :p
My mint is perfect for what I use it for. :)

zoomman
11-26-12, 08:35 PM
My software engineer brother-in-law showed me how to set up a virtual machine in Linux mint. "Type in KVM," he told me. I typed "KVM" into in Synaptic ... already installed! Yay Mint! So then I just installed a GUI front end for it, "AQEMU." Well, I set it up, installed Ubuntu 12.04 to look at the Unity desktop. It's nice, I suppose, but I had forgotten how much was needed to make Ubuntu as user friendly as Mint.

Anyway, tomorrow's being hailed as Charity Tuesday, or some-such, here in the US. Every year I donate $$ to my favorite charities, most- of which are open-source and Internet privacy centered. I'll be giving to Linux Mint again this year, It's soo good.

Rob A.
11-26-12, 08:42 PM
I used to dual boot Windows 7 and Unbuntu but I have since changed PCs I will have to do it again but try another Distro.

zoomman
11-26-12, 09:03 PM
My nice new Acer came with Win7 and, though it still is on there in case I need it for warranty purposes, has never been used since I partitioned the drive and put linux on the other partition.

What I like about this virtual machine business is that I can set up a few of them and install distros into them and I don't need to mess with the hard drive.:)

zoomman
01-17-13, 07:44 PM
Last summer, I think it was, I installed Puppy Linux (lucid) on an old USB drive, just to see if I could. I plug it in and tinker with it from time to (rare) time. Anyway, it was in my computer bag when my boss's Toshiba laptop refused to boot Win 7. I plugged in my USB, Puppy loaded into RAM; I set up CUPS for the printer, and voila! My boss was able to create the schedule was made and payroll was taken care of!

Puppy saves the day!

Electra2
01-18-13, 12:22 AM
I used to dual boot Windows 7 and Unbuntu but I have since changed PCs I will have to do it again but try another Distro.

Which one will you choose? :)
I now use Mint on both of my computers.

zoomman
01-18-13, 07:05 PM
Which one will you choose? :)
I now use Mint on both of my computers.

Yeah, xfce mint is brilliant!

BatBowey
10-07-13, 03:12 AM
Been thinking lately of which distro i should take.
Have a reasonable amount of experience with Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and CentOS 5(My minecraft servers OS).

So when i have the time, i'll put Fedora on my Lenovo Y500! Wee :D

someothertime
10-07-13, 04:44 AM
Distro choice is a balance between;

a) What runs on your hardware
b) What runs the main apps your gonna be using
c) Look and Feel
d) Ethics / Security / Bloat-Efficiency / Ongoing updates and support

( Intermediate / Advanced users are less concerned with look / feel and what runs the apps )

Most peeps are on Ub. these days cause it can do almost anything ( well they all can, but the support and codebase for Ub. is slicketty slick ). If your new, i'd recommend Ub on a productivity machine then if you got another box layin around to do a minimal install on you can learn some more stuff.

I've lean't towards Mint for the last few years but have used most of them.


What are the key apps / uses for the machine?

BatBowey
10-07-13, 05:25 AM
Mostly web browsing, school work and minor gaming. (expecting better Linux support for games on steam, when SteamOS has been out for a while)

someothertime
10-07-13, 05:32 AM
OK sweet. Wouldn't hurt to dual boot just in case ( Win for games {some}).

dvdnvwls
10-07-13, 05:45 AM
It seems to me that in 2013 ( in contrast with a number of years ago) all of the major well-known Linux distros are worth using and will work fine. If you're already used to one of them, then you get advantages from staying with what's familiar. If you want something a bit different, you can simply pick one, and you basically know it will be OK. Several "not for newbies" distros are now actually quite workable for most people, and several "newbies-only" distros are set up well enough that an experienced user can basically do whatever he likes.

darkknight89
10-07-13, 06:52 PM
Depends on what you mean by "use". If you count using Kali Linux simply for experimenting then yes. Otherwise I do everything else in Windows.