View Full Version : 3 reasons never to share your ADD


anonymouslyadd
11-22-15, 10:00 PM
1. Employees could scapegoat you when problems arose
2. Your boss may doubt your ability to accomplish assignments
3. You may be looked over for advancement opportunities

I cannot stress enough the danger in sharing your ADD with your employer. It is not worth the risk. I found this article here (http://http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/816.html)!

My ADD coach told me never to share that I had ADD unless my job was placed on the line. She had ADD, too. Why would she tell me that if it wasn't important?

intothewind
11-23-15, 12:04 AM
Another thing I found is that if anything is missing or a story arises that someone lost something it tends to get tied to you even if it was not you that time.

intothewind
11-23-15, 12:16 AM
Otoh pretending everything is all right is not ok.

I think sitting down and figuring out systems is important. Maybe dont call it add if you think it would be an issue.

All my bosses figured out I was a scatterbrain quickly. One grabbed a jacket I left behind and brought it to me with a motherly admonishment that I need to work on not leaving things. Embarassing when it takes less than a week :(

sarahsweets
11-23-15, 05:08 AM
I agree with you anon. Even if you do well with something, you dont want your boss to think : "even with adhd he still pulled it off!" Its not always the negative we have to worry about. We want our accomplishments to be admired without the adhd getting in the way.

Roundmouth
11-23-15, 07:13 AM
1. Employees could scapegoat you when problems arose
2. Your boss may doubt your ability to accomplish assignments
3. You may be looked over for advancement opportunities



I totally agree. People believe that laws against discrimination will help, but one can always argue that some qualities are required here and you don't seem qualified - whether you call it ADHD or not. I'm not yet open with my diagnose, officially I'm just Coocoo NOS. The problem is, I already experience those issues. It's like they try to hide me in a corner where I can neither do good or bad.

Nevertheless: I do intend to come out in the future, as soon as I've figured out how to reveil it. It takes too much energy hiding it and I really don't feel I have much to lose. I still hope it can make it easier for some people to understand that I'm not bipolar or borderline-psychothic, that I don't have any personality disorder and that I'm not a wild animal. I'm not saying that the conditions mentioned above would necessarily disqualify me, but it's a problem that people are reading in the wrong things in my behaviors.

jjamieson
11-23-15, 01:47 PM
I totally agree. People believe that laws against discrimination will help, but one can always argue that some qualities are required here and you don't seem qualified - whether you call it ADHD or not. I'm not yet open with my diagnose, officially I'm just Coocoo NOS. The problem is, I already experience those issues. It's like they try to hide me in a corner where I can neither do good or bad.

Nevertheless: I do intend to come out in the future, as soon as I've figured out how to reveil it. It takes too much energy hiding it and I really don't feel I have much to lose. I still hope it can make it easier for some people to understand that I'm not bipolar or borderline-psychothic, that I don't have any personality disorder and that I'm not a wild animal. I'm not saying that the conditions mentioned above would necessarily disqualify me, but it's a problem that people are reading in the wrong things in my behaviors.

These are my words exactly. Let me break this down for you.

I totally agree. People believe that laws against discrimination will help, but one can always argue that some qualities are required here and you don't seem qualified - whether you call it ADHD or not. I'm not yet open with my diagnose, officially I'm just Coocoo NOS.

What seems to be missing here is how people feel this way about you. This is how they feel already...you ARE an animal to them .....they are the ones who are not being honest and coming out and saying so to your face but they are thinking it and feeling it just the same. I see them as cowards and weak for not having the same courage as I do to simply come forth, admit your failings and be open and honest which requires you to take ownership of it and speak directly to others if you can summon the courage to do this with them. There is no way I can see doing this without having to admit that you cannot do some things the same as other people. If you don't want this to happen. Don't be honest and open.

Animals do not deserve to be treated the same as humans and therefore are disqualified period. Not just at work....everywhere you go in all your relationships across the board. ADHD dehumanizes you automatically as a person and nothing you do is going to change how another person feels about this no matter what you do. You are in check mate and don't even realize that you are and the game is over but you keep playing anyway thinking that you have a chance to win when there is no chance or hope of winning ever. If this is the case.....why play the game?

This is my experience exactly. All three things happened as described when I stupidly and ignorantly thought that I had a responsibility to be open and honest and inform my employer that whatever it was he thought he saw was not accurate and then explain to him my limitations in only 1 or 2 areas of concern. The problem was (in my stupid ignorant view)...that the attitude he had towards me was already there and he had already formed his opinion from the first impression that to the things he saw.

As a net result of this for me....the attitudes and treatment I received only became worse than before. I had just handed my boss and co workers the perfect excuse and justification to treat me like an indentured servant and dehumanize me in their eyes.( I used the "N" word as a metaphor only to express my personal feelings about this as a means to compare the same injustice to myself in my attempt to get them to see their contribution to why I was so angry.

Ultimately...this ended up with me almost beating the s*&t out of one of my co workers after work in the parking lot of our employer when he mouthed off this attitude to me (now...one too many times) outside of the safety of work in our off time without the roles and expectations in place to prevent this. This interchange concluded with two other co workers having to hold both my arms and hold me back because I was going to beat him within an inch of his life if he didn't step down and recant his attitude towards me. I ended up breaking a toe when I got a lucky kick in while my arms were held back and caught this guy in the hip only inches from his gonads which was my intended target. I realize now in retrospect....his words meant nothing and had no effect on my self esteem what so ever. I was offended, furious and angry at his tone, his attitude and the thoughts behind it that I know like the back of my hand. I just never put two and two together before since I don't see myself (my self image or self esteem) being based on my failings and have never had any lack of self confidence that would say...just because I have ADHD....does it preclude me from doing anything or disqualify me from being treated like anyone else.

The problem with laws that protect people from discrimination or being treated differently....is that only force people to go against how they feel and prevent them from acting on those feelings. The feelings are there whether the law is or not. It will not protect you from what other people think about you and how people feel about what they see on a personal level. In a moment of somewhat justifiable anger towards my co worker (his actions were completely out of line and unacceptable using any standard you can think of).....it ignorance on my end was my inability to understand this. No law or beating the crap out of a person is going to change how someone else feels and if they feel you do not qualify for the basic respects as everyone else.....the is literally nothing you can do about it. I was attempting to beat the respect I felt I deserved out of my co worker and force him (the same as the law would do) to give me a respect that I felt I deserved and he did not.

Ultimately....I quit this job only two weeks later after 26 years of employment by walking out one day without notice or without even talking to him directly and only telling one of his family members who had been reasonable with me in the past who I felt would be the only source who might not take this attitude and use it against me in the moment which I knew if that were to happen....I would probably lose it and come unglued at the seems I was so furious and disgusted at the entire situation. I never looked back and I never talked to anyone there since even with numerous phone calls and attempts to contact me and try and get me to talk to them. They needed resolution the same as I did but I felt so self righteous in my own defense that if I was not going to get any resolution to this problem....neither were they. If I have to live it ....so do you.

I totally get what you are saying....being a little coocoo is better than handing them a golden pass to be disrespectful and dehumanize you which all anyone needs to do this. The attitude and how they feel about me are already there by any other name you choose to call it.

I totally agree. People believe that laws against discrimination will help, but one can always argue that some qualities are required here and you don't seem qualified - whether you call it ADHD or not. I'm not yet open with my diagnose, officially I'm just Coocoo NOS. The problem is, I already experience those issues. It's like they try to hide me in a corner where I can neither do good or bad.

Nevertheless: I do intend to come out in the future, as soon as I've figured out how to reveil it.

This is the paradox isn't it?....it's not about how you do it....it's how do you get other people to change how they feel about it no matter what you or call.... or even what you do in all other areas of your life that are not affected by ADHD. They will still see the animal and treat you accordingly.

It takes too much energy hiding it and I really don't feel I have much to lose. Does it really? If you don't have anything to lose....then nothing you do will matter? The effort and energy in trying to be respectful, open and honest and then dealing with the consequences is a lot more work than lying, hiding and pretending. I've been doing that all my life....I can do this in my sleep with no effort what so ever. Isn't that easier than the alternative? If there are consequences for doing the right thing then why do it? Conversely...the consequences of not doing it are much easier and familiar and in my mind based on my experience...are much less damaging to me. It's easier to lie, cheat and steal than to be honest in this metaphor if the results of being honest are worse. It's an easy choice to make don't you think?

I still hope it can make it easier for some people to understand that I'm not bipolar or borderline-psychothic, that I don't have any personality disorder and that I'm not a wild animal. I'm not saying that the conditions mentioned above would necessarily disqualify me, but it's a problem that people are reading in the wrong things in my behaviors.

If it's all the same anyway....why bother? If they see an animal...changing the name isn't going to help. They will still treat you the same? This isn't just happening at work...it's been happening to you all of your life and you just didn't realize it. The failure on your part is not being able to see it.

After reading this and coming to the same conclusion.....I became furious and thought to myself....why should I even care if it doesn't matter anyway?

anonymouslyadd
11-23-15, 05:34 PM
I agree with you anon. Even if you do well with something, you dont want your boss to think : "even with adhd he still pulled it off!" Its not always the negative we have to worry about. We want our accomplishments to be admired without the adhd getting in the way.
Exactly, work isn't the place to get support or understanding for ADD, even though that would be nice.

Roundmouth
11-23-15, 06:50 PM
It makes me sad reading you didn't manage to castrate that guy in the parking lot, and I hope he'll give you an other opportunity in the future.

This coming-out thing is obviously not uncomplicated, but there are reasons why I want to do this. I'm not only a freak, I do have some positive reputation and there are people being aware of the things I'm good at. The youngsters like me and respect me, the same with the patients. I've told a few that I trust and they took it more or less like I expected. A patient to whom I had a very close proffessional relation identified my ADHD traits at an early stage and never had problems with that.

However, a handful of people in my own age and up have like united and begun striking against everything that seems to be standing in their way. They're bitter and mercyless and there's no organized resistance against them. My boss is a silly narcissist weakling, so he's naturaly capitulated before this little army of mummies.

When I was employed here, it wasn't because I was so normal, but because of some unusual talents of mine. That's how I'd like to mention this thing, like it's appearant to everybody, like it's something that everybody always have known. My boss would never admit that he hadn't already noticed the ADHD thing when he employed me - and I'm sure he actually would feel he'd need to defend that decission if confronted.

It's not at all about the principle of being honest. It's because I'm proud of this ADHD complex. It's not that I like my difficulties but I personally see them as just the bad side of a larger whole. I've always felt a strong connection between the dysfunctions labeled ADHD and those special talents I believe myself to have. I also believe there's a slight bit of cultural difference between the USA and northern Europe. My idea of CCC (coocoo conditions) isn't extremely radical over here.

But I'm aware I may be fatally wrong and that I may regret this decission in the future.

dvdnvwls
11-23-15, 07:13 PM
It's easy to list the disadvantages. There might be more, but those are a strong list already.

I think the more important part, and easy to miss in a discussion like this, is: it only takes one definite disadvantage to disclosing, in order to settle this case. Because who can think of a real advantage that can reliably be gained from telling an employer? Since there are no credible advantages to be had, why bother?

anonymouslyadd
11-23-15, 07:24 PM
It's easy to list the disadvantages. There might be more, but those are a strong list already.

I think the more important part, and easy to miss in a discussion like this, is: it only takes one definite disadvantage to disclosing, in order to settle this case. Because who can think of a real advantage that can reliably be gained from telling an employer? Since there are no credible advantages to be had, why bother?
You're right. Only one disadvantage makes it not worth it.

I think people want to believe their colleagues will understand.:(

intothewind
11-24-15, 04:19 PM
So being on mess normalizes behavior enough that no one would suspect?

acdc01
11-24-15, 05:38 PM
My ADD coach told me never to share that I had ADD unless my job was placed on the line. She had ADD, too. Why would she tell me that if it wasn't important?

I think that "unless my job was placed on the line" is a very important thing to remember. I take disclosure very seriously and in most cases, would never disclose.

That said, if you see yourself possibly losing your job in the future because you need accommodations and can't get them without disclosure, well then I'd talk to a lawyer about disclosing. Or if you can't be happy without disclosure too, then I'd consider it.

Both me an my coworker disclosed. She almost certainly would have been laid off without disclosure. Couple years after disclosure, she got the performer of the year award in her division. Disclosure was an enormous benefit for her. Disclosure hasn't benefited me as much as my coworker (we have different bosses) and there have been negatives. But overall, I'd still say I was better off for disclosing.

I really think you need to look at your specific case and not just apply a blanket "never disclose" answer to every situation.

TangledWebs
11-24-15, 07:01 PM
I concur!

dvdnvwls
11-24-15, 07:27 PM
I really think you need to look at your specific case and not just apply a blanket "never disclose" answer to every situation.
I understand your point. You have specific detailed knowledge of how cases differ, and you're in a job where disclosure has some potential significant positive effects. I have a feeling that, because of those things, among the people in this discussion you're in a very small minority. Too many people without your knowledge (and without your HR department) disclose ADHD in jobs where it can't possibly bring any benefit, because they believe that ordinary human kindness will benefit them in their situation.

Maybe a better way to put it would be this:

If you work in a place where there is no rule forcing your supervisor or boss to help you with ADHD, then you can be almost completely sure that they won't, even if they are good people. I think many ADHDers miss that point.

BellaVita
11-24-15, 09:25 PM
Is this true for all mental health diagnoses?

anonymouslyadd
11-25-15, 12:17 AM
I think the purpose in disclosing ADD is to give you time to find another job. If things are that bad, maybe the job is not for you.

KarmanMonkey
11-25-15, 10:58 AM
I agree with all the risks, and it's a very serous matter to disclose ANY health condition to your employer. In the right circumstances it can be beneficial, but you can never be sure that an employer will be understanding or sympathetic.

My usual advice to folks with a mental health issue is to steer clear of the labels, and instead focus on communicating what's helpful. For example, you might say:

"I don't trust my memory, so I try to write everything down, but it's best if requests are sent by e-mail so I don't have to rely on my memory, and if someone could take minutes in our morning meeting, I'd find it immensely helpful."

Basically focus on what work style fits you best, and learning those of your colleagues as well. The key is to demonstrate a willingness to learn the needs of your colleagues and to communicate yours. There are a lot of "accomodations" that are easy, and don't require a doctor's note.

EuphoricEndings
09-23-16, 11:41 AM
Thanks for posting this!

Looking back...I think I lost a job from telling my manager I had ADHD. I told her and she seemed cool with it. Next day after working two shifts (I worked second and third shift that day) I was exhausted and just wanted to go home. I get called into the office and lost my job. Didn't know how or why because I was taking my medication and was on point with everything. But I'm pretty sure telling her was why she fired me. People with ADHD are some of the coolest and most hardworking people out there and when things like this goes on, it makes me shake my head. It also makes me wonder how people can be so judgemental. What a mad world we live in.

anonymouslyadd
09-23-16, 04:06 PM
Thanks for posting this!

Looking back...I think I lost a job from telling my manager I had ADHD. I told her and she seemed cool with it. Next day after working two shifts (I worked second and third shift that day) I was exhausted and just wanted to go home. I get called into the office and lost my job. Didn't know how or why because I was taking my medication and was on point with everything. But I'm pretty sure telling her was why she fired me. People with ADHD are some of the coolest and most hardworking people out there and when things like this goes on, it makes me shake my head. It also makes me wonder how people can be so judgemental. What a mad world we live in.
I know. However, from her perspective she might believe that she's got a troubled, unproductive worker on her hands, and she's got a boss with expectations that need to be met.

EuphoricEndings
09-23-16, 05:01 PM
got a troubled, unproductive worker.

Haha at first I thought you personally called me a troubled & unproductive. :(
I read what you wrote waaay too fast:o

But thank god that job was just a side job and not my career. I'm a hair stylist, just from experience some of my co-workers have ADD/ADHD and the owner knows that we have it and just laughs at us if the 3 of us forgot to take our meds or if we misplace our shears, brushes or combs or cause of our meds wearing off. They just care about how much clientele you have and how good you are at cutting/coloring hair. Thankfully there are careers and industries that won't judge anything mental health wise. Even if they already knew or if they found out

But I totally understand where you're coming from though and genuinely thank you again for posting that. :)

Sorry that this was a long post or annoying at all. I'm a newbie to this site and just started yesterday and i just like the fact we can all come together and share our experiences and help each other.

mrzyphl
10-10-16, 12:14 PM
I got terminated from my job of 16 years back in January. I'm surprised I
lasted the first 3 months. If I were them I would have fired me at least 5
different times. At the beginning of January they implemented a job
performance review for the first time and I didn't fare to well. I could see it
coming and seriously thought of telling them about my ADHD as a last resort.
I couldn't bring myself to do it and I'm glad I didn't. I got a new job that I'm
much happier with now.

anonymouslyadd
10-11-16, 11:22 PM
I got terminated from my job of 16 years back in January. I'm surprised I
lasted the first 3 months. If I were them I would have fired me at least 5
different times. At the beginning of January they implemented a job
performance review for the first time and I didn't fare to well. I could see it
coming and seriously thought of telling them about my ADHD as a last resort.
I couldn't bring myself to do it and I'm glad I didn't. I got a new job that I'm
much happier with now.
Thanks for sharing!

acdc01
10-13-16, 07:33 PM
Both me and my coworker disclosed.

Had my coworker not disclosed, she would undoubtedly have been laid off as the economy was bad. After disclosure, she got treatment and got the top performer award and has gotten a major promotion.

My results were more mixed but overall I'm still better off for disclosing. One person has discriminated against me. But I'm also getting roles and responsibilities I would not otherwise have had if not for disclosure.

Note, Both of us have always performed acceptably but had one major incident as a result of our adhd prior to disclosure and accommodations.

There is absolutely no blanket answer for whether to disclose or not. It varies with each case. Best thing to do if your job matters to you is to talk to a lawyer or your union if you have one. Lawyer is only about 400 dollars where I live. Sounds like a lot but it's less than 1 month unemployment not to mention the financial loss if your entire career will be hurt by it.

anonymouslyadd
10-13-16, 11:25 PM
Both me and my coworker disclosed.

Had my coworker not disclosed, she would undoubtedly have been laid off as the economy was bad. After disclosure, she got treatment and got the top performer award and has gotten a major promotion.

My results were more mixed but overall I'm still better off for disclosing. One person has discriminated against me. But I'm also getting roles and responsibilities I would not otherwise have had if not for disclosure.

Note, Both of us have always performed acceptably but had one major incident as a result of our adhd prior to disclosure and accommodations.

There is absolutely no blanket answer for whether to disclose or not. It varies with each case. Best thing to do if your job matters to you is to talk to a lawyer or your union if you have one. Lawyer is only about 400 dollars where I live. Sounds like a lot but it's less than 1 month unemployment not to mention the financial loss if your entire career will be hurt by it.
Why would an ADD coach say not to disclose at work?

I'm glad that you've found some good in disclosing. I never said there wasn't. The key is to look at the big picture, and I believe your examples are outliers, rare moments with positive outcomes.

We disagree here. The only times you want to disclose is if you're job is put on the line. I believe in those times that that's just to buy you time before you find another job.

acdc01
10-13-16, 11:49 PM
Why would an ADD coach say not to disclose at work?

Your add coach must be doing a great job in what he was hired to do for you to trust him so much.

That said, he is not a lawyer and actually shouldn't be advising you at all in terms of any legal matters. He is certainly not knowledgeable enough to give you advice on the subject.

I don't disagree that most likely, the majority of people are not better off disclosing. But the percentage that are isn't so small that you shouldn't get a lawyer's advice. Especially if you've been in your career for a long time.

$400. It's nothing compared to a long career. And the lawyer is qualified to give you advice unlike your adhd coach.

anonymouslyadd
10-13-16, 11:56 PM
Your add coach must be doing a great job in what he was hired to do for you to trust him so much.

That said, he is not a lawyer and actually shouldn't be advising you at all in terms of any legal matters. He is certainly not knowledgeable enough to give you advice on the subject.

I don't disagree that most likely, the majority of people are not better off disclosing. But the percentage that are isn't so small that you shouldn't get a lawyer's advice. Especially if you've been in your career for a long time.

$400. It's nothing compared to a long career. And the lawyer is qualified to give you advice unlike your adhd coach.
She was a career/ADD coach. She helped link people with their career. She helped me discover my interests.

I never said not to get a lawyer!!! The point is that there will be consequences in disclosing and they will most likely be negative.

acdc01
10-13-16, 11:58 PM
I just realized I've posted the same thing here before. Sorry for the duplicate posting. Looks like an old post that was resurrected I guess.

Roxx1980
12-23-16, 06:43 PM
:grouphug:thanks so much for sharing your post! I totally agree. People believe that laws against discrimination will help, but one can always argue that some qualities are required here and you don't seem qualified - whether you call it ADHD or not. I'm not yet open with my diagnose, officially I'm just Coocoo NOS. The problem is, I already experience those issues. It's like they try to hide me in a corner where I can neither do good or bad.

Nevertheless: I do intend to come out in the future, as soon as I've figured out how to reveil it. It takes too much energy hiding it and I really don't feel I have much to lose. I still hope it can make it easier for some people to understand that I'm not bipolar or borderline-psychothic, that I don't have any personality disorder and that I'm not a wild animal. I'm not saying that the conditions mentioned above would necessarily disqualify me, but it's a problem that people are reading in the wrong things in my behaviors.

Fraser_0762
12-23-16, 07:21 PM
I don't think it's something you can not share with people. People who know what it is and how it effects people will know about it, whether you tell them about it or not.

jkimbo
12-23-16, 09:03 PM
4. none of their damn business!

sarahsweets
12-24-16, 08:08 AM
If someone noticed something in me and had the balls to ask if it was adhd, I dont think I would share it even then. Its not anyone elses business and the last thing I want to feel is that I need to explain away my behavior. I tell who I choose, if it makes sense.

anonymouslyadd
12-27-16, 12:21 AM
If we have a difficult time sharing ADD with our families, how can we ever expect to share it with our coworkers?

Little Nut
12-27-16, 10:14 AM
If someone noticed something in me and had the balls to ask if it was adhd, I dont think I would share it even then. Its not anyone elses business and the last thing I want to feel is that I need to explain away my behavior. I tell who I choose, if it makes sense.


LOL...not at your post, sarah, but at my likely responses to a nosy coworker that stepped over the line without explicitly saying so. Something along the lines of, "thank you for noticing, but just between us it is a case of chronic jock itch and it really interferes with my focus when talking, writing, reading, listening and concentrating. I'm uncomfortable talking about it, especially at work." Add appropriate body tic.

bryanrc51
12-27-16, 01:11 PM
To me it seems there is never one hard and fast rule for everything and this is no different. Although looking at risk / reward there seems to be little upside and a lot of downside. Seems like a gamble to disclose, that said I have disclosed but it is a family owned business and nothing bad has come out of it, maybe a little more understanding. I am getting tested for ASD sometime next year which I think would get even more understanding but every case is different.

roflwaffle
12-29-16, 06:09 PM
It's easy to list the disadvantages. There might be more, but those are a strong list already.

I think the more important part, and easy to miss in a discussion like this, is: it only takes one definite disadvantage to disclosing, in order to settle this case. Because who can think of a real advantage that can reliably be gained from telling an employer? Since there are no credible advantages to be had, why bother?
I guess that depends on location. In the US, an employer must be notified that someone has a disability prior to starting the interactive process. If I'm fired for poor performance and never told my employer about my disability, they have no legal obligation to not fire me even if my performance was related to my disability. On the other hand, if I mentioned my disability is impairing my performance, they have a legal obligation to participate in the interactive process if they want my performance to improve.

There's kind of a legal grey area when the company says they're OK with your performance even with a disability, but even that's tenuous, because they also have to provide you with the same opportunities for promotions/raises/etc, and if your disability is impairing your performance, then failing to look into accommodations could be considered discriminatory in that context.

ginniebean
12-30-16, 12:40 PM
so far, as far as my research into this has shown, the courts will not protect those with adhd. Our symptoms have been used to show us unfit for the job and the courts have accepted this.

Sadly, we are not protected.

jman05
01-12-17, 11:57 AM
I would only share it if you are screwing up a lot at work.

Jaykay8
08-09-17, 11:36 PM
The last job i had didn't specifically ask about 'mental illness' but the form did say 'Are you on any medication?' Does anyone have any experience with this? Did you tell the truth or lie? What happened?

finallyfound10
08-10-17, 12:14 AM
If I didn't work in a field where I could be drug tested, I would never tell.

In the US nurses are drug tested during the pre-employment process after you've been hires and we can be randomly tested so I have to disclose. I have worked for 2 big hospital systems and had disclose to Employee Health as the meds would show up in my urine test and bloodwork. I loathed doing it but it's a legal thing here.

Find out if you say no then they find out that you are on meds, can you be fired. You can risk it or tell the truth depending on the answer. I might risk it if the chances are very low that they would ever find out.

Cory_S
10-01-17, 04:01 PM
Personally I am fairly close with most of my co workers and I have had no problem telling them about my new diagnosis. If anything they can grasp that some of my shortcomings with remedial aspects of our job is not just laziness. No one is perfect and I do better in high stress aspects of our job that they all shy away from. I also work in a hospital so we are exposed to everything under the sun, so ADHD is relatively a tame subject compared to things we see in the ER.

kkristin17
10-09-17, 11:59 PM
Like most things in life, I think this is a really contextual matter.

In some careers, having ADHD might actually be seen as an asset, like marketing. You might get promoted to lead projects because of your "creative vision" or something along those lines.

Most of the time though, it seems like disclosing your ADHD in a career is just giving people ammunition to use against you.

Or maybe I'm just overly cynical from working in sales.