View Full Version : Is it true that people have had withdrawal symptoms even 10 years after stopping?


ZayKayWill
11-22-15, 11:36 PM
Not trying to scare anyone, but hearing something like this really concerns me... "Some of the tranquilliser groups can document people who still have symptoms ten years after stopping."

I read this in an article on PsychologyToday. If you don't believe me just enter that quote in Google and I'm prettu sure the first link will come up. If that's true that's really scary and kind of depressing...I've never done Benzos just stimulants like Adderall etc...

ZayKayWill
11-23-15, 12:00 AM
Here's the article for anyone curious: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/side-effects/201011/brain-damage-benzodiazepines-the-troubling-facts-risks-and-history-minor

Also just so we're clear I'm not trying to prove a point here. I'm just looking for some confirmation. I honestly hope to God that I'm wrong...

Stevuke79
11-23-15, 12:13 AM
I can't tell you about 10 years specifically, or about anyone other than myself.

But for me personally, after 4 years of 80 mg/day, I don't feel withdrawal when I take a break.

Stevuke79
11-23-15, 12:14 AM
Oops... wrong medication.. didn't take note of which subforum this was in. I have nothing to add to this discussion, of value or otherwise!

sarahsweets
11-23-15, 05:43 AM
i cant imagine that could even be possible. Once its out of your system its gone.

Fuzzy12
11-23-15, 09:01 AM
i cant imagine that could even be possible. Once its out of your system its gone.

If I understand the article correctly, the continued withdrawal effects aren't because the medication is still lingering in the system but because of possible brain damage that might have been caused by the meds.

I haven't read any of the studies (or anything else on this subject) apart from the linked article so I'm not sure how reliable it is. It seems like it warrants at least further research into the long term effects of benzos.

Little Missy
11-23-15, 10:35 AM
Some benefits outweigh the risks. I'll risk it.

Lunacie
11-23-15, 12:01 PM
Why do you find this so concerning when you say you haven't ever taken benzos?

ZayKayWill
11-23-15, 12:14 PM
Why do you find this so concerning when you say you haven't ever taken benzos?

Because I don't like the fact that doctors would allow people to tske that stuff if that's really true.

Little Missy
11-23-15, 02:04 PM
Because I don't like the fact that doctors would allow people to tske that stuff if that's really true.

Oh, believe me, doctors do a lot worse than prescribe benzodiazepines.

Little Missy
11-23-15, 02:05 PM
Because I don't like the fact that doctors would allow people to tske that stuff if that's really true.

Ha! Doctors do plenty worse than prescribing benzodiazepines.

Fuzzy12
11-23-15, 02:17 PM
Because I don't like the fact that doctors would allow people to tske that stuff if that's really true.

Like Missy said, sometimes the benefits outweigh the risks or the damage caused by the meds.

Also, if I understand correctly, the problem is that 30 years ago, there were negative results from a small study and the researchers asked for more research to confirm the results, which hasn't happened so far. So right now, they still just aren't sure what exactly is the damage, are there any serious long term effects and whom does it affect. At least, that's what I understood but my brain is a bit muddled today so maybe I'm talking rubbish.

dvdnvwls
11-23-15, 04:27 PM
It's very difficult to be sure when something is the effect of a drug and when it's the effect of something else - especially when the drug was administered a long time ago. People can be quite certain "Oh yes, it's the exact same as my withdrawal symptoms 10 years ago" - but people's memories are simply not reliable. They could be right, they could be wrong, nobody can prove any of this.

So... There's a chance it's true. There's a chance it's not true. If it is true, is the drug still worth it? For at least some people, the answer is yes.