View Full Version : Anyone else a forager?


intothewind
11-23-15, 05:32 PM
I've found foraging for food very enjoyable. It might help ADD people eat better in the following ways.

-It is interesting to prep something new and unusual(so long as the labor isn't too much...I harvested a bunch of acorns and doubt I will get around to processing them anytime soon)

-Can be as strenuous, easy, or difficult as you want it to be. Whether it is a hike nearby for some stinging nettles, sitting on a dock jigging squid, studying maps, field-guides, and weather and then trekking into the woods after mushrooms, or freediving in hopes of shooting flounder/perch...runs the gamut.

-fulfills that need to be doing something productive

-I don't feel bad for doing something very simple and wolfing it down...because hey that might have been a really expensive meal at a restaurant!

dvdnvwls
11-23-15, 06:57 PM
How would you get the bitter compounds out of acorns? (I know how bitter they are because when I was a little boy I thought "Oooo! I like nuts!" and I started to eat one. :) [I was smart enough to think "The ones that fell on the ground are probably the ripe ones", but not smart enough to think "... but they're acorns" :)]) Are they worth it when finished? Are there some worthless or bad kinds of acorns to avoid, or good kinds to aim for?

And... if I eat too many acorns, do I run the risk that someone may come along and turn me into jamón ibérico? :D

Unmanagable
11-23-15, 08:02 PM
I love foraging and want to learn more so I don't die in a field taste testing things. lol

Wild plantain, asparagus, red clover, dandelion, sassafras, morel mushrooms, chaga mushrooms, hen of the woods mushrooms, and most recently discovered a variety of Sweet Annie that just appeared in a raised bed.

A local friend does it for a living and sells to chefs around the globe. He grew up foraging with his grandpa and now he teaches his grandbabies.

intothewind
11-23-15, 11:27 PM
Haha I stick to obvious stuff...but the more you learn the more likely you are to find something edible. You should share recipes for those wild greens!



Dvd: after shelling and turning them into powder somehow (grinding stone or magic bullet;) ) you can...

Hot water over until it stops leaching. Kinda like making xoffee and earing the grounds...lol

Put in running water for a few days (old school)

Supposedly they yield a fine standard flour and a coarse type that is good for burger patties. Will see soon.

Unmanagable
11-23-15, 11:40 PM
I toss the wild greens into smoothies and salads. I dried some stinging nettle and lamb's quarters to use in my teas. I like the lamb's quarters in salads, too. Burdock root, catnip.........I love this stuff. Gonna do some pine teas and see how they taste. Nature provides and our bodies can thrive from learning how it was supposed to be fueled in the first place. It's a lost art and skill, that's for sure.

intothewind
11-23-15, 11:53 PM
It also is a money saver if you live near a clean natural area (unfortunately the majority of places I've lived pcbs in fish are a problem). Instead of buying microgreens just go pick some.

I did a challenge of going without purchasing meat for 2 months...while living on catalina. If I was ok with just eating fennel...I could probably have not bought veggies either.

After work id throw sabiki rigs for mackerel, or chase perch in the kelp forests. Also tried my hand at bullfrogs...but the work to meat ratio was not really worth it. A few days early on I went hungry but eventually did quite well!

intothewind
11-23-15, 11:56 PM
Dvdndls...when I was a kid I tried pulling out and eating the insides of a flower..I figured that's where bees got honey from. Bleh! (But some flowers do make great additions to dishes)