View Full Version : Is obsession, OCD?


baical
11-24-15, 05:02 AM
There is a drug for epilepsy called Dilantin. One book I read mentioned its use for obsession, but had no mention of OCD. I would assume if one can shut their obsessions, the compulsions or desire does not come to fruition that turns it into OCD. In other words, better shut the obsessions down before the compulsion or desire about what one is obsessing on turns in to full blown OCD.

Anyone here ever used Dilantin? Other anti-epilepsy drugs have been also used for OCD, mainly these are gabapentinoids such as Gabapentin, Pregabalin, etc. Even something like Baclofen and Phenibut belong in such category as gabapentinoids. GHB as well...

Fuzzy12
11-24-15, 05:51 AM
Hm, I'm not sure if obsession is exactly the same as OCD or if obsession is like the first step on the road to OCD. I could be wrong but I think, OCD usually has a compulsive part as well, e.g. you obsess causing extreme anxiety which temporarily gets alleviated a bit when you carry out your compulsion. I also don't think that OCD has much to do with desires. Obsessing about your objects of desire isn't really OCD (I think, I could be totally wrong).

Obsession in the sense of not being able to switch tracks in your thinking even when required can also be part of other disorders, e.g. ruminating that often goes with depression.

I found that anti depressants, both SSRIs and SNRIs were very helpful for both ruminating and sort of mild obsessive-compulsive behaviours but I've never heard of dilantin, so can't comment on that.

BellaVita
11-24-15, 08:18 AM
No idea what they would mean by that.

Another drug they are finding that might be beneficial for OCD is Zofran - I was prescribed it for a time (for my nausea) and noticed I felt less anxious/wasn't carrying out my compulsions as much.

Later, after reading the Wikipedia article found out that it is being studied because it might help with OCD.

I don't think my obsessions are always linked to my compulsions, but some times they are.

Also intrusive thoughts are another part of OCD that I don't think would be shut down just because obsessions are shut down.

baical
11-25-15, 04:12 AM
But obsession has to come "first" before "desire" takes over leading to OCD. IMO. It just makes sense. It just doesn't make sense to have desire (compulsions) without the obsession that leads to it, I think.

Obsessing about one's desires in a persistent and repetitive manner is a form of OCD. Once your brain is "trained" to become this, you become OCD.

My OCD seem to be co-morbid with ADHD. I like my ADHD med but seems as if sometimes I end up conentrating/focusing on my obsessions and eventual compulsions which leads me to OCD mode. Below is the exact page about Dilantin that I read about in the book Smart Drugs and Nutrients:

http://www.smart-publications.com/books/full-text/smart-drugs-and-nutrients/smart-drugs-and-nutrients-sec-5/smart-drugs-and-nutrients-sec5-phenytoin

baical
11-25-15, 05:04 AM
OCD can be a "good" thing if one's obsession is that of a productive nature and leads to productivity, not procrastination and mentally tasking/paralyzing thoughts several hours daily. I just think obsession leads to desire, therefore leads to impulsive behavior that leads to desperation then eventual disappointment that leads to depression. There is "attachment" involved in OCD, IMO. Whether with a person or an object (materialism). Something about obsessing about one's desires but never come into fruition because of hesitation and other various reasons. The mentally paralyzing effect of OCD just leads to a downward spiral (depression, etc.).

"In the early 1910s, Sigmund Freud attributed obsessive–compulsive behavior to unconscious conflicts that manifest as symptoms.[80] Freud describes the clinical history of a typical case of "touching phobia" as starting in early childhood, when the person has a strong desire to touch an item. In response, the person develops an "external prohibition" against this type of touching. However, this "prohibition does not succeed in abolishing" the desire to touch; all it can do is repress the desire and "force it into the unconscious".[82]"

Remember OCD is: Excessive thoughts (obsessions) that lead to repetitive behaviors (compulsions). In that order...so in other words, kill the obsessions and you won't have compulsions (therefore you do not become OCD).

BellaVita
11-25-15, 05:05 AM
But obsession has to come "first" before "desire" takes over leading to OCD. IMO. It just makes sense. It just doesn't make sense to have desire (compulsions) without the obsession that leads to it, I think.

Obsessing about one's desires in a persistent and repetitive manner is a form of OCD. Once your brain is "trained" to become this, you become OCD.

My OCD seem to be co-morbid with ADHD. I like my ADHD med but seems as if sometimes I end up conentrating/focusing on my obsessions and eventual compulsions which leads me to OCD mode. Below is the exact page about Dilantin that I read about in the book Smart Drugs and Nutrients:

http://www.smart-publications.com/books/full-text/smart-drugs-and-nutrients/smart-drugs-and-nutrients-sec-5/smart-drugs-and-nutrients-sec5-phenytoin

My compulsions I'm not always obsessed about, but I just feel like I HAVE to do it, it is a compulsion.

I don't think obsession has to come first.

I think it has to do with not properly regulated/improper levels of certain neurotransmitters as one of the causes.

Like, I'm not obessed with corners of my room, but feel the need to compulsively check the corners of my room.

I think it starts off as a minor worry, for example washing hands: I need to be clean of germs. But then it becomes a compulsion, and then we have to wash our hands over and over. And then that compulsion is mixed with a form of obsession.

Sometimes my brain just "picks" something for me, that seems to have no significant meaning, but that I have to perform the compulsions or else I get irritated.

It's really hard to say.

baical
11-25-15, 05:12 AM
Let's not forget that obsession and desire are forms of "attachment". Agree? Disagree?

The Buddha once said that attachments causes men to fail...

baical
11-25-15, 05:16 AM
well your compulsions to check the rooms has become an obsession. You may not think obsession came first but compulsion so now your compulsion has become an obsession so what does it matter? Maybe your unconscious has always been obsessed with checking corners of your room and you just weren't aware of it since it is the "unconscious" making you do these things that lead to compulsive behavior?

My compulsions I'm not alwaysobsessed about, but I just feel like I HAVE to do it, it is a compulsion.

I don't think obsession has to come first.

I think it has to do with not properly regulated/improper levels of certain neurotransmitter as one of the causes.

Like, I'm not obessed with corners of my room, but feel the need to compulsively check the corners of my room.

i think it starts off as a minor worry, for example washing hands: I need to be clean of germs. But then it becomes a compulsion, and then we have to wash our hands over and over. And then that compulsion is mixed with a form of obsession.

Sometimes my brain just "picks" something for me, that seems to have no significant meaning, but that I have to perform the compulsions or else I get irritated.

It's really hard to say.

BellaVita
11-25-15, 05:17 AM
well your compulsions to check the rooms has become an obsession. You may not think obsession came first but compulsion but not your compulsion has become an obsession so what does it matter? Maybe your unconscious has always been obsessed with checking corners of your room and you just weren't aware of it since it is the "unconscious" making you do these things that lead to compulsive behavior?

If I were secretly obsessed with corners of my room all along, well then I sure am odd! :lol:

Fuzzy12
11-25-15, 05:22 AM
OCD can be a "good" thing if one's obsession is that of a productive nature and leads to productivity, not procrastination and mentally tasking/paralyzing thoughts several hours daily. I just think obsession leads to desire, therefore leads to impulsive behavior that leads to desperation then eventual disappointment that leads to depression. There is "attachment" involved in OCD, IMO. Whether with a person or an object (materialism). Something about obsessing about one's desires but never come into fruition because of hesitation and other various reasons. The mentally paralyzing effect of OCD just leads to a downward spiral (depression, etc.).

"In the early 1910s, Sigmund Freud attributed obsessive–compulsive behavior to unconscious conflicts that manifest as symptoms.[80] Freud describes the clinical history of a typical case of "touching phobia" as starting in early childhood, when the person has a strong desire to touch an item. In response, the person develops an "external prohibition" against this type of touching. However, this "prohibition does not succeed in abolishing" the desire to touch; all it can do is repress the desire and "force it into the unconscious".[82]"

Remember OCD is: Excessive thoughts (obsessions) that lead to repetitive behaviors (compulsions). In that order...so in other words, kill the obsessions and you won't have compulsions (therefore you do not become OCD).

I'm not sure you understand OCD correctly (or maybe I don't :scratch:). OCD has very little to do with desires, unless the desire is to be free of that nagging feeling of compulsion and anxiety that you feel you can only alleviate by giving in to the compulsion. OCD also by definition is not a good thing. Yes, it might in a very, very narrow area of your life have some superficial benefits (like your hands always being clean) but that in no way makes up for the destruction it causes (for example, the skin of your hands peeling off from all the washing possibly causing infections, etc.)

Also, obsession is different to ruminating. I don't think that in OCD you necessarily have to think non-stop about the object of your obsession.

obsession leads to desire, therefore leads to impulsive behavior that leads to desperation then eventual disappointment that leads to depression. There is "attachment" involved in OCD, IMO. Whether with a person or an object (materialism). Something about obsessing about one's desires but never come into fruition because of hesitation and other various reasons. The mentally paralyzing effect of OCD just leads to a downward spiral (depression, etc.).


I'm not an expert on OCD but to be honest this doesn't sound necessarily like OCD to me. Again, I think, there is a big difference between obsession and OCD. In OCD you aren't necessarily attached to the thing that is involved in your OCD and it doesn't really have to include disappointment of not getting your thing, whatever it is.

baical
11-25-15, 07:27 AM
You must have O.D.D. :lol:

I've been obsessed with lightswitches and doorlocks...

If I were secretly obsessed with corners of my room all along, well then I sure am odd! :lol: