View Full Version : I don't forget anything


BellaVita
12-03-15, 10:34 AM
Okay, here comes post number #1237474 from BellaVita this week. :rolleyes:

But I have this thing, I can recall all of my thoughts in detail - things I've thought in the past I still remember.

It sucks because I don't like all of the thoughts I've thought in the past.

I can retell my thoughts (for example) detail by detail that I had last night - hours worth of thoughts. Each. Freaking. Detail.

It's a gift and a curse.

I sometimes wish I could forget things, it just seems easier.

But I don't forget.

A similar thing applies to conversations, I am surprised sometimes when people don't remember details of a conversation from a year ago.

Sometimes I feel like I'm drowning in all of the details.

I just want to forget things sometimes - ya know!?!

Any tips for dealing with a brain that doesn't forget?

Anyone else like me?

Abi
12-03-15, 10:55 AM
Fortuna forgets nothing!

Often, she's like "We've had this conversation before."

Of course, that's probably because I was drunk when we "had that convo before" and forgot.

BellaVita
12-03-15, 10:57 AM
Cool.

It makes sense.

BellaVita
12-03-15, 11:01 AM
Oh my goodness I just had this thought -

Being in my 40s.

x2 the amount of details

Having 20 more years worth of details I think I might just...that is a scary thought.

I have enough as it is.

Abi
12-03-15, 11:18 AM
:)

xxx

stef
12-03-15, 12:14 PM
Only to some extent, I dont remember everything, but the things I remember are with extreme clarity. Yet it's quite random. What I was wearing, the setting, the weather that day. It's like a short scene from a movie.

Sometimes I can't even remember my cell phone number and then last summer a collegue called me in a panic looking for the password for an old secured document; I remembered it and it's something I had never worked on, I just printed it out once, in 2013.

Lunacie
12-03-15, 12:54 PM
That sounds like Sheldon Cooper on The Big Bang Theory. I've seen another tv show where a detective had that kind of memory.

It's called an eidetic memory, and I can absolutely see where it can be both a gift and a curse.

Me ... I can't remember a conversation I had two hours ago. :umm1:

BellaVita
12-03-15, 01:30 PM
Only to some extent, I dont remember everything, but the things I remember are with extreme clarity. Yet it's quite random. What I was wearing, the setting, the weather that day. It's like a short scene from a movie.

Sometimes I can't even remember my cell phone number and then last summer a collegue called me in a panic looking for the password for an old secured document; I remembered it and it's something I had never worked on, I just printed it out once, in 2013.

Haha nice! Bet that colleague was very thankful.

BellaVita
12-03-15, 01:38 PM
That sounds like Sheldon Cooper on The Big Bang Theory. I've seen another tv show where a detective had that kind of memory.

It's called an eidetic memory, and I can absolutely see where it can be both a gift and a curse.

Me ... I can't remember a conversation I had two hours ago. :umm1:

I've heard of Sheldon Cooper, but I've never watched the show. The other show about the detective - is it Adrian Monk?

If so, I LOVE that show! I actually have DVDs of it here, and David told me I should write a little note on it that says "just talk to me instead." (Because I'm very similar to Monk)

I read the Wikipedia page for eidetic memory - and that doesn't sound like what I have. It spoke of mostly visual memory which mine stinks.

Perhaps there's a different form of it though?

I am pretty uneducated on this topic.

By the way - I hope the title of this thread doesn't sound like I don't forget ANYTHING - there are things I can't recall. I have difficulties with numbers and anything visual. (Although I can remember every post I've read here, well, 95% well maybe not 95%, I don't know, it is rather difficult to put a percentage on that type of thing. Like, not every post do I remember with 100% clarity, for example some I can't remember word-for-word, but I always remember the post.)

I'm not a superhuman - it's really just what I described in the OP.

Lunacie
12-03-15, 03:23 PM
I've heard of Sheldon Cooper, but I've never watched the show. The other show about the detective - is it Adrian Monk?

If so, I LOVE that show! I actually have DVDs of it here, and David told me I should write a little note on it that says "just talk to me instead." (Because I'm very similar to Monk)

I read the Wikipedia page for eidetic memory - and that doesn't sound like what I have. It spoke of mostly visual memory which mine stinks.

Perhaps there's a different form of it though?

I am pretty uneducated on this topic.

By the way - I hope the title of this thread doesn't sound like I don't forget ANYTHING - there are things I can't recall. I have difficulties with numbers and anything visual. (Although I can remember every post I've read here, well, 95% well maybe not 95%, I don't know, it is rather difficult to put a percentage on that type of thing. Like, not every post do I remember with 100% clarity, for example some I can't remember word-for-word, but I always remember the post.)

I'm not a superhuman - it's really just what I described in the OP.

I forgot about Monk, when I think of that show I think of OCD. But he did have a photographic memory.

The show I was remembering had a woman in the starring role, it was called Unforgettable. She also had a photographic memory.

I didn't realize that the term eidetic memory mostly refers to photographic memory.

I looked at the Wiki page and the Hyperthymesia sounds more like what you experience.

I wish I could remember posts better. I will semi remember a post but not who made it or which thread it was in and go nuts trying to find it.

Numbers are a real bugaboo for me. Example, I got gas a couple of days ago and I'm used to having to give my pin number when I use my debit card, but at this gas pump it asked for my zip code. I just stood there staring at the gas pump, able to remember my pin but not my zip. Ugh!

BellaVita
12-03-15, 03:30 PM
I forgot about Monk, when I think of that show I think of OCD. But he did have a photographic memory.

The show I was remembering had a woman in the starring role, it was called Unforgettable. She also had a photographic memory.

I didn't realize that the term eidetic memory mostly refers to photographic memory.

I looked at the Wiki page and the Hyperthymesia sounds more like what you experience.

I wish I could remember posts better. I will semi remember a post but not who made it or which thread it was in and go nuts trying to find it.

Numbers are a real bugaboo for me. Example, I got gas a couple of days ago and I'm used to having to give my pin number when I use my debit card, but at this gas pump it asked for my zip code. I just stood there staring at the gas pump, able to remember my pin but not my zip. Ugh!

Cool I'll go read about that. :)

Ugh that stinks, numbers can be difficult. :grouphug:

BellaVita
12-03-15, 03:51 PM
I read the Wikipedia article on Hyperthymesia and hmmm....I sure as heck don't remember each day of my life in detail. :lol:

I think I just have a really good memory or something.

But I did relate to it sometimes being like this:
It has been proposed that the information encoded by hyperthymestics is semantic and therefore semantic cues are used in retrieval. Once cued, the memory is retrieved as episodic and follows a pattern similar to that of a spreading activation model. This is particularly evident in AJ's case. She describes how one memory triggers another, which in turn triggers another and how she is powerless to stop it...

That is kinda how it's like with me and memories of conversations, I think. Sort of. It's like, I will be having a conversation with someone, then they will say a phrase that will trigger a memory of a conversation I had with them two years ago, and then that will trigger like a web of other detailed (conversational) memories in association.

As for the detail stuff...

But really, it's like I "just remember" the details for whatever reason. I don't make an effort to, they are just there.

It's like, once I read it(a post) my brain keeps it. (again not always word-for-word, especially with long posts, but I will not forget that post and any important information I might need later)

Which brings me to another thing, when I am hearing something or reading something, I have this little intuitive feeling with some things that says "remember that you might need that later" and then I'll remember it. It's like I tune in and encode that information in my brain.

I also recall my dreams every single night and I store them like memories. They feel like another world. They actually feel like memories.

Little Missy
12-03-15, 03:59 PM
I remember practically everything. Smells, sights, sounds, places, the
weather, what I wore, who I was with, what was said, the song that came on...

Dates, numbers, addresses and phone numbers throughout every state and city I've lived in. SO much. The floor plans of neighbours homes when I was three. Their furnishings...

I rather like it.

BellaVita
12-03-15, 04:03 PM
I remember practically everything. Smells, sights, sounds, places, the
weather, what I wore, who I was with, what was said, the song that came on...

Dates, numbers, addresses and phone numbers throughout every state and city I've lived in. SO much. The floor plans of neighbours homes when I was three. Their furnishings...

I rather like it.

That sounds rather pleasant.

But it doesn't bother you?

That actually sounds more similar to Hyperthymesia than what I have.

Abi
12-03-15, 04:17 PM
<img src="http://members.tripod.com/~iknowwhatudid/istill.jpg"></img>

peripatetic
12-03-15, 05:22 PM
i don't have an autism spectrum disorder, but I do have an unusual memory, so thought I'd share.

I have what's considered an "eidetic" memory/photographic memory. *however*, it's sometimes quite useful and oftentimes not so much in a practical sense, because I struggle with identifying the passage of time and duration.

example:

I can recite verbatim any page of the norman kemp-smith translation of the first critique.

I cannot tell you from memory, without looking at my pill dispenser, if I took my meds this morning.

why is this? I have a "picture", so to speak, of every page of that book and many others. I also have several pictures of me taking my meds, in the clothes I'm currently wearing, in the house I live in, with weather like today's, so the same lighting... what I don't have is a way to determine if any of those is today. it feels very "humean froth" in that sense.

so, I can recite in detail conversations I've had that are in text form...but I can't tell you for certain what I was doing exactly one hour ago.

I remember my dreams quite well, too. I have very graphic ones that are.....they're not just jumbled, they are like completely possible in real life. the nightmares are, at least.

anyway, that's me. xx

midnightstar
12-03-15, 06:21 PM
I remember crap that happened years ago but can't remember much short-term :scratch:

dvdnvwls
12-03-15, 06:44 PM
Hmmm...

I wonder whether having a memory that is distinctly non-average - in some way - is common for many of us on here?

If life in society was a quiz game show like Jeopardy, I would be a highly successful participant. (It isn't, and I'm not. :() I remember facts, details, numbers, ... but not the ones I wish I could. Nobody calls me Sheldon... I get called Cliff (the postman character from "Cheers" who always came up with a new useless piece of information) :o

Unmanagable
12-03-15, 08:12 PM
I can remember every little detail about darn near everything, except what I'm supposed to remember, most days.

Delphine
12-03-15, 09:19 PM
When I was younger... not much younger.... I remembered things in vivid detail..... who said what.... where they were standing when they said it... everything/everyone else in the room.... the tone of voice..... verbatim.

It used to flummox me when anyone remembered things differently.

Now - at 56 - the good news for anyone who doesn't want to remember such detail is that things blur with age, according to me anyway.

(A few short years ago, during a period of deep grief after loss of child, I trained myself... forced myself to drop some memories ... flicked myself on the wrist/ studiously autocorrected to thoughts.feelings more in keeping with wanting to stay alive.... so maybe that reset my memory banks? Maybe)

But now.... 5 years later..... I have a hard time remembering who said what when.... Completely different ballgame.

Perhaps this is an aging thing for everyone, and nothing to do with my personal experience. If so... it is good news for anyone who wishes to not to remember more than they want to.

I think it is most probably an aging thing. Although in recent times, I can still remember who said what when, and what they were wearing/doing... and how they were standing when they said it....

These days, sometimes when someone reminds me of something that happened, or what someone said a few short years ago, I hear it as if for the first time. That's new for me.

Aging might be your friend on this one. If that's good news for you. :)

dvdnvwls
12-03-15, 11:07 PM
These days, sometimes ...
... I hear it as if for the first time.

Much too often, I say something as if for the first time, when everyone around me knows it's anything but the first time I've said it. :o

stef
12-04-15, 04:26 AM
Wow!I was looking at types of memory last night; I definitely have *something* and very possibly, THIS!


Hyperthymesia is the condition of possessing an extremely detailed autobiographical memory. Hyperthymestics remember an abnormally vast number of their life experiences.

Individuals with hyperthymesia can recall almost every day of their lives in near perfect detail, as well public events that hold some personal significance to them. Those affected describe their memories as uncontrollable associations, when they encounter a date, they "see" a vivid depiction of that day in their heads.[3] Recollection occurs without hesitation or conscious effort.

It is important to draw a distinction between those with hyperthymesia and those with other forms of exceptional memory, who generally use mnemonic or similar rehearsal strategies to memorize long strings of subjective information. Memories recalled by hyperthymestic individuals tend to be personal, autobiographical accounts of both significant and mundane events in their lives. This extensive and highly unusual memory does not derive from the use of mnemonic strategies; it is encoded involuntarily and retrieved automatically.[4] Despite being able to remember the day of the week on which a particular date fell, hyperthymestics are not calendrical calculators like some people with autism or savant syndrome. Rather, hyperthymestic recall tends to be constrained to a person's lifetime and is believed to be a subconscious process.

It's not a photographic memory exactly but then I can remember the notebooks I used in some college classes (biology and history), I can "see" my writing but it's like looking at it from a distance, I can't decipher it.

And I just thought of this: most likely why I take so few pictures. It's all "in my head". And then the pictures taken are not of the things I actually remember in the first place.

OMG thank you bella for posting this I've learned a lot!

Adenosine
02-26-16, 11:53 PM
Plenty of actual life experiences are murky, but I can absorb and recite enough vocabulary and technical information to appear much more knowledgeable about virtually any subject than I really am. I had some of the worst organizational skills you've ever seen, but I managed to earn perfect scores on many ninth and tenth grade tests anyway, because I could often parrot well over the necessary amount of material without reading any given textbook passage more than once. This is likely the only reason I did not fail a grade or two. It speeds the process of true understanding, as with those video game facts I used to memorize, but it also lets me scrape by without it.

As I look at it, rote memory is one of the areas that autism doesn't generally harm very much. The Asperger's types have a reputation for being fairly good at it, though some of that may spring from perseveration.

Adenosine
02-27-16, 09:06 PM
I'm reading Leo Kanner's early paper on autism. It seems like he noticed some of the same rote abilities, despite the rather severe forms he encountered.

I think those abilities might explain why some people think we're all geniuses. They're much weaker than what someone like Daniel Tammet can do, but they make us look like we know everything.