View Full Version : Vayarin - Prescribe dosage by Dr. by accident for 5 months. Should I try again?


sbcy
12-04-15, 10:46 PM
My general doctor prescribe 1 capsule of Vayarin per day over 6 months ago, which I've been taking. He told me it takes 3+ months to work, so at an appointment ~2 months ago I asked about upping the dosage and he said no, 1 capsule is all that's done - more wouldn't help. Turns out he was WRONG the recommended dosage, even for little kids is 2 capsules per day! Stupid me for not checking this 5+ months ago.

Anyway, I don't seem really much better, though it's hard to tell what is what with all the other meds I'm on that are working generally crapyly for me. My question I suppose is, should I take the plunge and pay ~$55/month for 4 months at the correct minimum dosage of 2 capsules per day to see if it will help or just drop it?

namazu
12-05-15, 12:30 AM
Personally, I would drop it.

The company markets Vayarin as a "medical food".

According to the FDA (http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/MedicalFoods/default.htm), a medical food is "a food which is formulated to be consumed or administered enterally under the supervision of a physician and which is intended for the specific dietary management of a disease or condition for which distinctive nutritional requirements, based on recognized scientific principles, are established by medical evaluation."

The company is not supposed to label a "medical food" product "Rx only" (though their photos suggest they label it that way anyway!).

In addition, products marketed as "medical foods" are not held to the (minimal) standards that even dietary supplements are held in terms of health claims.

Given that people with ADHD do not have "distinctive nutritional requirements, based on recognized scientific principles, established by medical evaluation", it seems strange that the company is marketing the product as a "medical food" altogether.

The product is not approved to treat ADHD by any independent health/safety review board or government agency, as far as I'm aware, even if the "Rx-only" label and the company's advertising makes it seem like it is.

Some people do see some benefits from fish oil / fatty acid supplements. You can buy omega-3 fatty acid supplements over the counter that are very similar, possibly for a lower price (or similar, but without having to buy 4 month's worth at a time).

And in general, it's hard to tell what's responsible for what (either good effects, or unwanted side effects) if you start taking or changing several medications all at once.