View Full Version : Are people born with addiction?


mildadhd
12-09-15, 01:52 AM
Are people born with addiction?

Fuzzy12
12-09-15, 06:55 AM
I'm not sure what you mean. As far as I know they aren't unless they've been excessively exposed to highly addictive substances in utero. For example, I think, some babies born to mothers with heroin addictions can be addicted to heroin as well.

Some people apparently are more prone and vulnerable to certain addictions (for example, ADHD might make you more vulnerable to addictions) and that could have to do with genetic factors.

daveddd
12-09-15, 10:39 AM
It takes a bit to get addicted to something. Unless like fuzzy mentioned born to addicted mother

But there are some interesting studies on traits of addicts that may make them prone

Poor social skills.

Inability to regulate socially

Poor self regulation

And more. Maybe I'll check later I'm just on break now

Fuzzy12
12-09-15, 01:07 PM
It takes a bit to get addicted to something. Unless like fuzzy mentioned born to addicted mother

But there are some interesting studies on traits of addicts that may make them prone

Poor social skills.

Inability to regulate socially

Poor self regulation

And more. Maybe I'll check later I'm just on break now

Break from ADDF?? :scratch:

daveddd
12-09-15, 01:08 PM
Break from ADDF?? :scratch:

Nope work

Fuzzy12
12-09-15, 01:20 PM
Nope work

Oh ok...I read it wrong.. :lol:

mildadhd
12-09-15, 10:09 PM
I'm not sure what you mean. As far as I know they aren't unless they've been excessively exposed to highly addictive substances in utero. For example, I think, some babies born to mothers with heroin addictions can be addicted to heroin as well.

Some people apparently are more prone and vulnerable to certain addictions (for example, ADHD might make you more vulnerable to addictions) and that could have to do with genetic factors.

Distresses and genetic factors are definitely involved. It is really really sad that we punish people addicted to heroin.

coffeesudoku
01-20-16, 04:29 PM
There are definitely both genetic and environmental components. Twin studies have been done showing pretty significant concordance rates...but often one twin turns out an addict and the other is well adjusted, which shows you that how you're raised and your early life experiences play a huge role. I think that have a supportive family helps too.

Fuzzy12
01-20-16, 04:39 PM
Distresses and genetic factors are definitely involved. It is really really sad that we punish people addicted to heroin.

Yes :(

It's really sad that we punish so many people for so many things no one should be punished for :(

Socaljaxs
01-21-16, 12:20 AM
Do you personally know someone addicted to herion? Or know people in real,life addicted to an stubstsnce?

Sadly, I think for some people they are both genetically and (environmentally (nature and nuture) more prone to addition than others are. But regardless of both factors addiction does and can happen. Plus, people,don't really understand how addition truly works( it's way more complicated that what a book tells you) but the internal process and struggle one with additions can and will suffers with daily. Someone that has been sober for let's say 20 years will still be fighting every day to get one more day sober. Hence why relaps happens so commonly.

Most don't truly and can't empathize or understand addition, they see it as the person is selfish and it's just discipline and control to fix. They don't really understand the pain and struggle the substance causes. While it can be best to isolate an addict and have the hit bottom on their own to choose to get help. The reality of an addict is very sad and something many cant understand. for some substances, the withdrawal process can in fact kill a person if not detoxes properly. And I have known 2 people that stopped using herion but years later are still continuing methodone treatment. The withdrawal for herion is nasty.

Distresses and genetic factors are definitely involved. It is really really sad that we punish people addicted to heroin.

sarahsweets
01-28-16, 05:41 AM
I believe there are genetic components involved but I dont know what they are. In the circles I run in, there are so many people who are alcoholics that grew up as children of alcoholics and even generations of alcoholics. I also think it has to do with how you were nurtured or raised. Maybe if the genetic component is there but you have super loving,emotionally available parents, you may not pick up that addictive substance? And there are plenty of cases where people are addicts and cant seem to trace that back to family, although alot of times its just that the family hides addiction really well. And I think addiction can be drugs or alcohol. My grandfather was an alcoholic, my dad was a drug addict alcoholic and I am an alcoholic with no drug problem.

Unmanagable
01-28-16, 04:17 PM
This thread makes me think of my discovery of the depths of food addiction and how it's widely fostered by those who make and sell us our food products (check out a book called, "Let Them Eat Junk"), and widely ignored by most, even though there's building evidence that the functioning of our gut greatly affects the rest of our health, be it physical or mental, and that it is all connected.

It's like the domino effect from hell that many have little control over, most especially based on finances, accessibility, and time. Most of which are mainly determined by our state of employment and how much of a supportive environment we are able to live in. It's a tough one to navigate, especially once you realize just how many issues are actually rooted in it that can be drastically improved.

What we are fed from birth also determines a whole lot about our outcomes in life, I feel, (that whole strong foundation concept) but I never even thought of it to that extent until I drastically changed what I eat and started reading and observing more. It's an epidemic of paramount proportions, in my opinion, and it's picking up speed with each synthetically created substance they call food that gets us hooked.

Not sure if we are born with it, but we surely aren't given much of a chance to ever step out of it unless we aggressively seek it ourselves and are able to deflect the backlash of being so different from everyone else. We are all eat up with food addiction in some form or another, be it by choice or by circumstance, but it's definitely having a large effect on the state of things, from my particular experiences and viewpoint. Born into vs. born with I guess would more accurately describe this one.

Abcdef
01-30-16, 11:32 AM
I remember I went through a phase of eating junk food all the time. I realised I had become addicted to it when it began to make me feel sick, but still, in my mind this was the only food that felt "right", other food would not be as "pleasurable". Luckily I managed to pull myself out of the hole somehow and again adapt a healthier diet.

Even though I was truelly addicted I had made several bad choices before it became an addiction.

You always have that choice period before you become addicted, addiction is not something that happens over night.

dvdnvwls
01-30-16, 11:40 AM
I remember I went through a phase of eating junk food all the time. I realised I had become addicted to it when it began to make me feel sick, but still, in my mind this was the only food that felt "right", other food would not be as "pleasurable". Luckily I managed to pull myself out of the hole somehow and again adapt a healthier diet.

Even though I was truelly addicted I had made several bad choices before it became an addiction.

You always have that choice period before you become addicted, addiction is not something that happens over night.
But as you just showed, when you're experiencing it "in real time", you might not know that you're in some kind of choice period. That's only obvious afterward.

Abcdef
01-30-16, 01:28 PM
I suppose that's one way of looking at it.

However, I would say it took a good few weeks before I was actually addicted. Only after this time period my body and mind became used to it.

There was various factors that affected my choices up until then, depressed, being lazy etc

I would say you are not instantly addicted to things but various factors in your life can weaken your choice period and lead to overall addiction setting in.

Being ADHD you are more susceptible to addiction because you have symptoms that affect choice. But again there is always choice before addiction.

dvdnvwls
01-30-16, 01:32 PM
I suppose that's one way of looking at it.

However, I would say it took a good few weeks before I was actually addicted. Only after this time period my body and mind became used to it.

There was various factors that affected my choices up until then, depressed, being lazy etc

I would say you are not instantly addicted to things but various factors in your life can weaken your choice period and lead to overall addiction setting in.

Being ADHD you are more susceptible to addition because you have symptoms that affect choice. But again there is always choice before addiction.
You're still right. But if you have a choice at a time when you aren't aware that you have a choice, is it fair to describe it in the way that you just did?

Abcdef
01-30-16, 01:59 PM
At the time you could say I was unaware that by repeatedly eating junk food I would become addicted to it. I was uneducated on the matter.

But now that I am aware what can happen, I wont be going down that route anytime soon, it would be 100% my own fault.

Unmanagable
01-30-16, 02:44 PM
At the time you could say I was unaware that by repeatedly eating junk food I would become addicted to it. I was uneducated on the matter.

But now that I am aware what can happen, I wont be going down that route anytime soon, it would be 100% my own fault.

That's pretty much the point I was trying to make of folks being born into it. Thanks for prompting me to think through it again. We're being wrongly educated to begin with. Our parents were, too. Much of the science that some of these nutritional theories are based on is some pretty scary, as well as rather antiquated stuff, in my mind.

Then, if you're raised on certain foods and taught they are the very things that sustain your life, that bring comfort, that provide your daily recommended nutrients, that taste so damn good, are actually made affordable and highly accessible, not to mention specifically engineered to be highly addictive, then you have no need or desire to look for other sources of nourishment because you're doing the best you can with what's available, and as long as you're still alive and fending off hunger, it's all good, because that's all you're able to make sure happens in the moment.

Until, or unless, you experience complications with your health, which most of us eventually do. But we rarely look to food as being a root cause of those issues. At least not until we've exhausted all of the other avenues we are strongly advised to seek out and programmed to do via seeking medical assistance, where we find them feeding us the same highly processed toxic crap in their care facilities, creating even more issues (grrrr). We rarely ever question what we eat, unless we have a belly ache or diarrhea, at least I never did.

Unless we are somehow powerfully inspired to educate ourselves more with information other than what we've already been taught, learn how our bodies actually work and how to build a strong foundation from within, are able to find teachers willing to help us within our ability to receive it, and also be lucky enough to live in an environment that supports healthier choices, financially, physically, and emotionally, it's a damn tough path to approach and experience any long term success with, more often than not.

It really infuriates me that the healthiest and often times most effective options are the farthest out of reach for so many peeps. This subject really tugs at my heart strings in a big way, as you can likely tell by my run-on sentences, lol. So very much depends on what we ingest. So much.

sarahsweets
01-31-16, 09:19 AM
I remember I went through a phase of eating junk food all the time. I realised I had become addicted to it when it began to make me feel sick, but still, in my mind this was the only food that felt "right", other food would not be as "pleasurable". Luckily I managed to pull myself out of the hole somehow and again adapt a healthier diet.

Even though I was truelly addicted I had made several bad choices before it became an addiction.


The idea of addiction being a choice is popular among people that still think of beating an addiction is simply an act of willpower and picking yourself up by the boot straps.
Yes, the choice to use any substance is always there, but no one chooses to become an addict. Some people pick the wrong substance to try and become addicted to it, but the choice in using it was not because the person knew they would be addicted and choose to use it anyway. You didnt know you were going to have an issue with crappy food. Yet when you ate it, you were aware that maybe it wasnt the healthiest choice, and you ate it anyway. Its not your fault that you became the addict.

You always have that choice period before you become addicted, addiction is not something that happens over night.
Yes, choosing to use a substance is a choice. For many people its that one uneducated or educated choice that wakes the beast.
I suppose that's one way of looking at it.

However, I would say it took a good few weeks before I was actually addicted. Only after this time period my body and mind became used to it.

Especially when things are legal, this is an issue. I am an alcoholic. I was always an alcoholic because when I drank I drank alcoholically. But The physical and mental obsession didnt become evident in the early days. I thought everybody drank like me. It wasnt until I saw my life going in the sh*ter that I realized it was a huge problem. There were early warning signs the whole time though.

There was various factors that affected my choices up until then, depressed, being lazy etc

I would say you are not instantly addicted to things but various factors in your life can weaken your choice period and lead to overall addiction setting in.

Being ADHD you are more susceptible to addiction because you have symptoms that affect choice. But again there is always choice before addiction.

Some people are not instantly addicted to something, in that they dont immediately have the mental and physical craving for it the minute they try it, thats true. But I personally believe that if you are an addict, the "addiction-unspecified" was in your before you used the magic substance. As in, maybe you have dormant addiction somewhere inside, and because you never used cocaine, you never had problems. But when you did use cocaine, you triggered the beast and your life was forever changed.
I have smoked pot a handful of times in my life. I never liked it and it never did anything for me. I never became addicted to it. The first time I drank alcohol however, it did. This was when I was 13. That first drink set the stages for an addiction that almost killed me physically and emotionally.

Personally I believe and addicted is genetically predisposed somehow. Many addicts never have anything manifest in their lives because they are lucky enough to have never introduced that substance into their bodies. But because no one knows they are an addict until that substance is evident and a problem, its less about choice. If I knew that drinking alcohol the first time, which is legal and promoted everywhere, would mean I would become an addict, do you think I would have tried it even once?
If you knew food would do what it did to you, would you have eaten it?

Pilgrim
01-31-16, 11:12 AM
You can be predisposed to it.

mildadhd
01-31-16, 01:03 PM
ADHD predisposition may or may not be involved, but cannot do anything by itself.


There is a significant hereditary contribution to ADD--sensitivity, subject of the next chapter--but I do not believe any genetic factor
is decisive in the emergence of ADD traits in any child. (1)

Genes are codes for the synthesis of the proteins that give a particular cell its characteristic of structure and function.

They are, as it were, alive and dynamic architectural and mechanical plans.

Whether the plan becomes realized depends on far more than the gene itself.

It is determined for the most part, by the environment.

To put it differently, genes carry potentials inherent in the cells of a given organism.

Which of multiple potentials become expressed biologically is a question of life circumstances.


Gabor Mate M.D., "Scattered", p 48-49

Abcdef
02-01-16, 06:02 PM
Its not your fault that you became the addict

Nobody held a gun to my head, but I guess various other factors influenced my decisions as already mentioned.

If you knew food would do what it did to you, would you have eaten it?

I should have been more responsible, but at the time I couldn't really give a s**t and when I did, it was too late.

The good news is I managed to get back onto a healthier diet and start up the gym again....the problem was rectified within 2 months. This required willpower and better choices.

I went through similar situations with other things, but now that I'm more educated on them it has never caused further problems.

sarahsweets
02-02-16, 05:33 AM
Nobody held a gun to my head, but I guess various other factors influenced my decisions as already mentioned.



I should have been more responsible, but at the time I couldn't really give a s**t and when I did, it was too late.

The good news is I managed to get back onto a healthier diet and start up the gym again....the problem was rectified within 2 months. This required willpower and better choices.

I went through similar situations with other things, but now that I'm more educated on them it has never caused further problems.

So then would you say that someone who cant stop drinking or using drugs lacks willpower?

Abcdef
02-02-16, 06:12 AM
So then would you say that someone who cant stop drinking or using drugs lacks willpower?

My Grandfather was an alcoholic and chain smoker, it was only until he had a major heart attack that he gave them both up...instantly.

You say you have given up drinking?

What is the main factor that helps people quit then?

mctavish23
02-02-16, 10:28 PM
Correlation does not equal causation.

Research supports genetic tendencies towards the "possibility" of addiction (i.e., pre-

-disposition). However, that doesn't guarantee that the individual will become an addict.

As a Recovering Addict, this is a topic of interest to me.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

sarahsweets
02-03-16, 05:30 AM
My Grandfather was an alcoholic and chain smoker, it was only until he had a major heart attack that he gave them both up...instantly.

You say you have given up drinking?

What is the main factor that helps people quit then?
For me it was a twelve step program and the fact that I hit a bottom. I was just done being so sick all the time and done with the toll it was taking on my body. I am sure to some extent it involved my will, but its a physical addiction which goes beyond willpower alone.

daveddd
02-03-16, 07:02 AM
So then would you say that someone who cant stop drinking or using drugs lacks willpower?

in the literal sense yes

but i don't think there is a scientific definition of willpower to confirm this

daveddd
02-03-16, 07:15 AM
if you view willpower as an issue of morality , or making choices between good and bad, then no i don't think an addict lacks that

I've never had a physical addiction, my drug was coke which is psychological , but my understanding that people who have physical addictions like heroine or alcohol continue to crave even after the physical withdrawal is well over with

Fuzzy12
02-03-16, 07:16 AM
if you view willpower as an issue of morality , or making choices between good and bad, then no i don't think an addict lacks that

I've never had a physical addiction, my drug was coke which is psychological , but my understanding that people who have physical addictions like heroine or alcohol continue to crave even after the physical withdrawal is well over with

I wonder if will power is just a result of your reward system working correctly?

daveddd
02-03-16, 07:20 AM
I wonder if will power is just a result of your reward system working correctly?

I'm sure it is

I'm just not sure exactly the whole extent of the reward system

reward system=self regulation

to pinpoint my reasons of use (which isn't exclusive ) i finally saw when i used it was to escape or avoid unpleasant and not always well defined internal states of emotional turmoil

so does a proper reward system internally handle these issues? seems like it

Abcdef
02-03-16, 08:46 AM
For me it was a twelve step program and the fact that I hit a bottom. I was just done being so sick all the time and done with the toll it was taking on my body. I am sure to some extent it involved my will, but its a physical addiction which goes beyond willpower alone.

I suppose in some cases it takes a noticeable event ie hitting rock bottom, a life threating incident etc for the brain to reset and then it's willpower then on after.

mctavish23
02-03-16, 04:55 PM
sarah,

Everyone has their own unique "tipping point," or however you want to define "hitting

bottom." In terms of the previously mentioned example, my initial reaction was to

remember that "Survival is the strongest instinct across all species."

tc

Robert