View Full Version : Children and therapy : your experience


Khamy25
12-11-15, 01:00 PM
Hi,

I have started my journey with adhd. My son is 12 he has been diagnosed three months ago. We will start in few weeks medication. I know therapy helps a lot but I wonder if it really works with adhd children.

The patient has a key role to play I'm a bit septical it could work with young children, with teens yes I think if they are willing to actively participate and do their part of job.

What is your experience and how old are your children?

My insurance covers only unlimited psychotherapy sessions but I need to use it carefully otherwise my out of pocket money could be very high. That's a shame to think about money matter for health issues :(

BellaVita
12-11-15, 01:24 PM
My experience: if it is therapy aimed at making them someone they are not, it can severely mess up the child.

If it is accepting of who the child is, and tries to work with them and doesn't force anything on them, there is a chance it will work and be helpful.

Khamy25
12-11-15, 03:24 PM
Thanks!

I hope I'll get some testimonials.

I'm not sure if my child is ready for that but I may ask him. It's also difficult to find a good therapist to build a trust relationship.

ccom5100
12-11-15, 08:12 PM
I think therapy helps a child with adhd because they are often misunderstood and criticized by teachers, peers, etc. A good therapist allows the child to sort out his feelings and helps him deal with disappointments. A good therapist will also help build up the child's self-esteem. Twelve is a good age to see a therapist as the child is entering a period in his life (puberty) where there are so many frustrations. My grandson with adhd sees a therapist and it has been a very positive experience for him.

CanadianDad
12-11-15, 08:23 PM
I think therapy helps a child with adhd because they are often misunderstood and criticized by teachers, peers, etc. A good therapist allows the child to sort out his feelings and helps him deal with disappointments. A good therapist will also help build up the child's self-esteem. Twelve is a good age to see a therapist as the child is entering a period in his life (puberty) where there are so many frustrations. My grandson with adhd sees a therapist and it has been a very positive experience for him.
We're looking at some form of Therapy for our little guy, but it will be more geared towards helping him deal with his Anxiety. I forsee when he hits puberty needing some for self-esteem, and will absolutely make sure he gets it if needed.

Khamy25
12-11-15, 09:46 PM
We're looking at some form of Therapy for our little guy, but it will be more geared towards helping him deal with his Anxiety. My son has also been diagnosed with mood disorder. So I suppose therapy will help him.

How old is your child?

Khamy25
12-11-15, 09:48 PM
I think therapy helps a child with adhd because they are often misunderstood and criticized by teachers, peers, etc. A good therapist allows the child to sort out his feelings and helps him deal with disappointments. A good therapist will also help build up the child's self-esteem. Twelve is a good age to see a therapist as the child is entering a period in his life (puberty) where there are so many frustrations. My grandson with adhd sees a therapist and it has been a very positive experience for him.

Yes you're right we'll try it then.

Thanks!

CanadianDad
12-12-15, 09:41 AM
My son has also been diagnosed with mood disorder. So I suppose therapy will help him.

How old is your child?

Our little guy is 7, in Grade 2. Academically he's doing quite well. Reading and math is above grade level. Has issues with writing and "out-of-the-box" type questions. Very quiet in public, comes across as shy, but it's anxiety until he's familiar with new places/people. We had his Psychologist meet with the school during the IEP process and all his accomodations are written down now. Doing a LOT better than Grade 1 :) Keeping my fingers crossed.

Khamy25
12-12-15, 12:38 PM
That's great you got the support needed for him. I suppose you paid the psychologist to come to the meeting?

Your child has also adhd?

The psychiatrist said he's more concerned about his mood disorder than about his distraction. His mood disorder is the top priority for him I suppose therapy sessions will be recommended soon.

I hope some members will talk about their experience I'm a bit lost I don't know what to expect, how choosing the therapist... Many questions in my head :confused:

Lunacie
12-12-15, 01:20 PM
We found a wonderful therapist for my autistic granddaughter when she was younger, doing what is called Play Therapy. She still sees him now that she's 14.

Her older sister who has adhd and anxiety didn't want to see the same therapist. It's good for her to have a place to vent about things without being judged.

Their dad just died so they'll both be seeing their therapists on Monday to talk about how they're feeling.

Khamy25
12-12-15, 01:36 PM
Oh it's sad! Yes therapy will be helpful.

Have you noticed improvements in your older granddaughter's behavior since she started her therapy?. How long did she start therapy? Is it once a week, twice a month...?

I think the trickiest part is finding the right therapist.

CanadianDad
12-12-15, 07:08 PM
That's great you got the support needed for him. I suppose you paid the psychologist to come to the meeting?

Your child has also adhd?

The psychiatrist said he's more concerned about his mood disorder than about his distraction. His mood disorder is the top priority for him I suppose therapy sessions will be recommended soon.

I hope some members will talk about their experience I'm a bit lost I don't know what to expect, how choosing the therapist... Many questions in my head :confused:

Yes, Psychologist billed for the school visit.
Yes, his diagnosis is ADHD with Anxiety and High Functioning problems.
We found our therapist through a Montessori School he attended for Kindregartten.

BellaVita
12-12-15, 07:12 PM
I dislike any therapist who attempts to change my natural autistic behavior.

daveddd
12-12-15, 11:31 PM
I dislike any therapist who attempts to change my natural autistic behavior.

thats a tough one for me

i feel the same about ADHD sometimes, but i guess i cant blame them if the problems im working on are ADHD, right, tell them its an issue then be offended for them tryiong to work on it?

have you read about ACT(acceptance commitment therapy) ? seems to be doing well

acceptance being the key term in the title

sarahsweets
12-13-15, 06:21 AM
I feel like the whole world could benefit from therapy. I know for all three of my adhd kids at one point or another it was super helpful. It gave them a place to learn to deal with issues that I could not (try as I might) help them with.

Khamy25
12-13-15, 01:17 PM
I'm glad to hear that. I know sometimes people don't see any benefits after years but maybe the therapist wasn't good enough or maybe their relationship.

BellaVita
12-13-15, 03:51 PM
thats a tough one for me

i feel the same about ADHD sometimes, but i guess i cant blame them if the problems im working on are ADHD, right, tell them its an issue then be offended for them tryiong to work on it?

have you read about ACT(acceptance commitment therapy) ? seems to be doing well

acceptance being the key term in the title

Yeah, I guess it depends.

I meant things like rocking, flapping, spinning etc...if those things make someone else uncomfortable then that is their problem.

Those are my natural ways of expressing emotion.

ToneTone
12-13-15, 07:00 PM
The difference between "a therapist" and a very good therapist or excellent therapist is huge.

The difference between a very good therapist and a very good therapist who is a good match for your child is even more huge--or should I say, HUGER!

The quality of the patient-therapist bond is so important. So you're looking for someone your son really likes. If your son looks forward to going to therapy, that's a good sign. It's sad but true. There are a lot of mediocre therapists out there ... and combine a mediocre therapist with a weak bond between the therapist and the client, and you get a prescription for little progress.

I see nothing wrong with long-term therapy, as someone who has been in therapy multiple times as an adult and who has been in therapy recently for many years.

Here's the thing ... therapy is often trying to get us to build a skill or behavior that does not come naturally to us ... Often the skill or new behavior is inherently fragile ... Sort of like high-level fitness. You don't get into shape and think, "I've solved my fitness issues forever." Nope, you have to work to stay in shape. Therapy and personal growth and treatment are similar ... So a patient/client makes progress ... and then comes a stressor or setback, and it's so easy for the patient to go into emergency mode and throw away all that they have learned ...

Good luck.

Tone

dvdnvwls
12-13-15, 07:11 PM
The quality of the patient-therapist bond is so important. So you're looking for someone your son really likes. If your son looks forward to going to therapy, that's a good sign. It's sad but true. There are a lot of mediocre therapists out there ... and combine a mediocre therapist with a weak bond between the therapist and the client, and you get a prescription for little progress.
Some studies (done quite a long time ago - I don't know whether newer research has superseded this) appear to show that the quality of the bond between patient and therapist is just about the only thing that matters in therapy.

Khamy25
12-13-15, 08:12 PM
Some studies (done quite a long time ago - I don't know whether newer research has superseded this) appear to show that the quality of the bond between patient and therapist is just about the only thing that matters in therapy.

When we saw the psychiatrist he made an emphasis on building a trust bond with him which will take times.