View Full Version : Mindfulness techniques for impulsive ADDers


anonymouslyadd
12-15-15, 04:04 AM
I really need help with this and am looking for ways to deal with my impulsivity. I struggle with some techniques but am able to handle others. Please share any tips and when possible, links to websites for further reading.

As long as I have a good cue, I can listen to sounds and count five of them before starting over again. I've also began looking for the colors of the rainbow in my environment.

stef
12-15-15, 04:59 AM
I don't struggle much with impulsivity but I love this looking for colors of the rainbow! I think it would be very soothing if I'm feeling overwhelmed. there is this thing at work, sometimes I've prepared something that needs to be signed, and the person is rereading the document line by line before signing, and I just don't know where to look but I have to just stand there until the thing is signed because someone else needs it or it has to be mailed right away.

I don't have any techniques though to suggest,sorry...

anonymouslyadd
12-15-15, 05:07 AM
I don't struggle much with impulsivity but I love this looking for colors of the rainbow! I think it would be very soothing if I'm feeling overwhelmed. there is this thing at work, sometimes I've prepared something that needs to be signed, and the person is rereading the document line by line before signing, and I just don't know where to look but I have to just stand there until the thing is signed because someone else needs it or it has to be mailed right away.

I don't have any techniques though to suggest,sorry...
They call it a "rainbow walk" here (http://http://www.mindfulteachers.org/2014/10/rainbow-walk-mindfulness-activity.html).

Unmanagable
12-15-15, 09:12 AM
My best advice is to dive inwardly much deeper to find your own signature inner cues. Once you find it inside, you'll learn, and be drawn to, more of the techniques better suited to your individual needs.

The harder I sought external cues from others to help get me there, the longer I struggled with arriving, if that makes sense. It was like I was putting my pursuit of wellness on hold (even if only in my mind) until somebody somewhere could provide me with a way that finally worked for me.

But, it's definitely a very good way to figure out what doesn't work, so it has its benefits. It's like taking the longer scenic route to get to a destination that's right around the corner. I've always been directionally challenged, so I guess that follows suit with everything in my life.

Celebrating the recognition, acceptance, and arrival of self is some powerful mojo that brings about much self-empowerment, when we don't talk ourselves out of it. It's a long strange trip, indeed. Wishing you luck in your continued pursuits.

anonymouslyadd
12-15-15, 09:53 PM
My best advice is to dive inwardly much deeper to find your own signature inner cues. Once you find it inside, you'll learn, and be drawn to, more of the techniques better suited to your individual needs.

The harder I sought external cues from others to help get me there, the longer I struggled with arriving, if that makes sense. It was like I was putting my pursuit of wellness on hold (even if only in my mind) until somebody somewhere could provide me with a way that finally worked for me.

But, it's definitely a very good way to figure out what doesn't work, so it has its benefits. It's like taking the longer scenic route to get to a destination that's right around the corner. I've always been directionally challenged, so I guess that follows suit with everything in my life.

Celebrating the recognition, acceptance, and arrival of self is some powerful mojo that brings about much self-empowerment, when we don't talk ourselves out of it. It's a long strange trip, indeed. Wishing you luck in your continued pursuits.
I think Sarek mentioned me and a specific type of technique within the impulsive context. I don't want someone to tell me something to try. I'm looking for guidance into a group of exercises that might be beneficial to my symptoms.

Unmanagable
12-15-15, 11:00 PM
I think Sarek mentioned me and a specific type of technique within the impulsive context. I don't want someone to tell me something to try. I'm looking for guidance into a group of exercises that might be beneficial to my symptoms.


This was one of many helpful starting points when I first ventured into seeking methods that worked for me:

http://yourskillfulmeans.com/section/meditation-practices/

Happy hunting and practicing. May you find something that clicks with your needs.

"Tell me something to try" vs. "guidance into a group of exercises"....terminology twisters to my brain...both mean the exact same thing to me when it comes to information sharing and gathering. :scratch:

Language remains our greatest barrier. Sorry if it seemed like I was doing something other than trying to guide you via sharing what's worked for me through my experiences with meditation so far.

anonymouslyadd
12-15-15, 11:05 PM
This was one of many helpful starting points when I first ventured into seeking methods that worked for me:

http://yourskillfulmeans.com/section/meditation-practices/

Happy hunting and practicing. May you find something that clicks with your needs.

"Tell me something to try" vs. "guidance into a group of exercises"....terminology twisters to my brain...both mean the exact same thing to me when it comes to information sharing and gathering. :scratch:

Language remains our greatest barrier. Sorry if it seemed like I was doing something other than trying to guide you via sharing what's worked for me through my experiences with meditation so far.
I new you were trying to be helpful, and I needed to be more specific as to my minds. Thanks for all you've done for me in furthering my growth.

:grouphug:

sarek
12-16-15, 04:31 AM
Mindfulness is not necessarily limited to meditation only. You can practice throughout the day.

The best approaches to starting mindfulness work is through the body. That is where it begins. You can use your senses as anchors for your mindfulness.

It doesnt have to be difficult. When you listen to the birds for a few seconds, you are in fact already practising. All it takes for a mindful lifestyle is to take those short moments of mindfulness and "enlarge" them until they become your life.

I can give you a few pointers which worked for me though you still have to bear in mind what Unmanageable said.

- Watching your breath is a very good one. The most important thing you can do here is to regularly teach yourself to breathe using your abdomen, not your chest.
- Every now and then, just stop what you are doing, as if you are frozen. Stop moving, stop thinking. Pretend to be one of those robot street artists who are able to stand still for long periods of time.
- Pick an activity you would normally already do and make it mindful. That means that you take care to feel the touch of what you are handling, to feel the weight, to be consciously aware of where your hands are. I like to practice the "ninja way of life" because that comes naturally to me. Its as simple as trying to be silent when you do things that otherwise would make sound.
- Check out this page: http://www.endlesssearch.co.uk/exercises_attention.htm It is one of the sites I used when doing my fourth way work. It has a number of attention exercises which could be quite useful.

Unmanagable
12-16-15, 12:09 PM
Another place I do a lot of reading is at an online magazine website, mindful.org. I don't think I can share the link here, but it's provided a wealth of info to me, for all things related to mindfulness. You can search their site directly for more specific terminology to narrow down to the topics you wish to read about.

anonymouslyadd
12-18-15, 10:40 PM
I'm making small strides and have found Sarek's "freeze technique" to be helpful. I hope with more practice that I'll be able to have more control over my mind.

sarahsweets
12-19-15, 05:24 AM
I look at mindfulness sort of like "grounding" which I learned about in a womens trauma program. I had to learn to sort of use my mind and body to feel where I was physically and mentally.

anonymouslyadd
02-16-16, 10:46 AM
I look at mindfulness sort of like "grounding" which I learned about in a womens trauma program. I had to learn to sort of use my mind and body to feel where I was physically and mentally.
I notice myself denying my thoughts and feelings often. It's getting a little better, though.:)

anonymouslyadd
02-20-16, 06:15 PM
Does anyone know of ways to use hearing in practicing mindfulness? I'd love to hear them.