View Full Version : Bacopa and lions mane, your opinions please?


Funky1
12-19-15, 12:25 PM
I have a friend who has given me some supplements she says are very popular in the supplement world for treating ADHD. Bacopa and lions mane oils. Just wondering if anyone has any personal experience with either? I'm not really sold either way yet, just curious.

Greyhound1
12-19-15, 01:06 PM
I am not a big fan of herbal supplements supplements in general. I know the Lions Mane is a mushroom and has been used for centuries in Chinese medicine. It probably does have some medicinal value just not sure about it helping with ADHD.

I know nothing about Bacopa.

Most supplements are marketed with greatly exaggerated claims and they get away with it since they are not regulated. I would be careful and thoroughly research before considering.

dvdnvwls
12-19-15, 03:27 PM
The Wikipedia article on bacopa (a water plant, often called water hyssop) states it has been used in Ayurvedic treatments for a long time to improve comprehension, memory, and recollection. Those in themselves are unfortunately not the major problems for ADHD.

Imagine that your car has six fuel injector nozzles but it's running poorly because two of those are not working. A friend of yours recommends an excellent brand of motor oil that is known to improve performance. Of course using better oil is not wrong (as long as it does no harm in the process), but changing the oil is not going to have any effect on the malfunctioning fuel injectors.

Pilgrim
12-19-15, 04:34 PM
I would give those a big miss.

mctavish23
12-19-15, 09:54 PM
None of those are evidenced based (peer reviewed research derived & supported) clinical

treatments for ADHD.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

BellaVita
12-20-15, 12:04 AM
Most supplements actually don't even contain what they say they contain, according to studies.

Not regulated.

And, if there was some fantastic supplement that treated ADHD well, everyone would know about it.

Alternative medicine that works is called medicine.

burger
12-20-15, 03:14 AM
I might avoid lions mane but I could be thinking of another nootropic.

I take bacopa and it works for me. Either the bacopa (most likely) or fish oil boosted my working memory based on dual n-back testing. It isn't for everyone though so you may have to toss it in the trash if the negative effects are too much. Negative effects vary from person to person and you may get no negative effects. You should see results within 3 weeks. It takes 3 months or longer to build up to full strength. I have taken it for about 15 months. You might want to decrease the dosage after half year or so by a bit. You could try dual n-back testing for 2-4 weeks to see if your working memory is impaired. If it is then bacopa might help if it isn't then bacopa may be a waste of time.

2 up arrows for memory.
http://www.printfriendly.com/print/?source=homepage&url=https%3A%2F%2Fexamine.com%2Fsupplements%2Fbaco pa-monnieri%2F

Fixing your working memory is only part of fixing adhd. Stimulants seem to do much more depending on the stimulant and I guess the person. .

daveddd
12-20-15, 06:29 AM
I got a bacopa plant

Should eat some. Someone else said this too

TygerSan
12-20-15, 09:53 AM
Bacopa and ginko have some research to back up their claims of cognitive enhancement. Not enough to completely remove skepticism, but enough to provide food for thought.

Do consider your source for supplements, though and find a trusted supplier. There isn't a whole lot of oversight wrt the supplement industry and you want to make sure you are getting something that contains the active ingredient and is manufactured well.

Funky1
12-20-15, 04:15 PM
Thanks for the input! I wasn't putting much stock into either, just curious more than anything.

dvdnvwls
12-20-15, 05:16 PM
Thanks for the input! I wasn't putting much stock into either, just curious more than anything.
The more good questions (like yours) that get asked on here, the more opportunity there is for all of us to learn about what helps others, what could never help anyone, and what might help some people but hasn't been tested enough.