View Full Version : Five characteristics to avoid in a job


anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 12:47 AM
ADDers always want to know which job is the best for them. It's hard to tell if one career is better than another, but there are characteristics of a job that we should avoid.

With the help of an ADDitude article here (http://http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/173/slide-1.html), I compiled a list of five job components all ADDers should avoid:

1. Repetition
2. Strong organizational skills
3. Desk jobs
4. Strong attention to detail
5. Excessive planning

One or two of these characteristics may become acceptable should their be something that excites the ADDer. Of course, things are rarely conclusive, but I believe this list is a good start!

Hathor
12-25-15, 01:15 AM
Interesting topic, but I like repetitious jobs like commercial fishing and roofing as I can daydream and work at the same time.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 02:10 AM
Interesting topic, but I like repetitious jobs like commercial fishing and roofing as I can daydream and work at the same time.
I think this is one of the most important topics for an ADDer.

Hathor
12-25-15, 02:40 AM
how about avoid jobs with a lot of d!ckhead co-workers?

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 03:32 AM
how about avoid jobs with a lot of d!ckhead co-workers?
I would agree with that! I think the environment is important to an ADDer.

namazu
12-25-15, 03:53 AM
I think the environment is important to an ADDer.
It's important to everyone! But definitely something to keep in mind as it relates to your own needs as someone with ADHD.

As for making a rule-based list of characteristics to avoid in a job -- I'm not sure it can be done in a way that's universally applicable to "all" ADHDers.

As you noted, sometimes the specifics of a job can trump the things on a general list -- and some ADHDers are more or less impaired in some areas than others.

In addition, most jobs involve some mix of tasks, some of which will be harder or easier, more appealing or less appealing. Sure, it's good to find a job that allows you to use your strengths and doesn't draw too heavily on your weaknesses, but it's not necessarily realistic to rule out all jobs requiring organization or planning. Even creative artists and freelance writers often have to manage projects and deadlines and supplies and insurance and... A lot of the most active, non-desk jobs involve a lot of repetitive work.

There are members here who are musicians, accountants, lawyers, parents, sales reps, personal assistants, teachers, nurses, researchers, visual artists, construction workers, counselors, truck drivers, editors, computer programmers, retail workers... You name it, someone here probably does it! And there are others who are temporarily or permanently unable to work for various reasons.

So much is contextual that I feel like telling ADHDers to avoid certain types of jobs as a general rule is unnecessarily limiting. More useful, in my opinion, is suggesting that people identify their own personal strengths and weaknesses, the environments where they've been most successful, and the situations in which they've been motivated to work hard -- and to look for ways to incorporate that experience into their work, whether that means focusing on certain types of jobs (or ruling some out), or trying to fit some of those good elements into whatever their current job situation is.

Perhaps the list you created serves that function for you; my intent here isn't to tell you you're wrong about your list! But I'd hate to see other young (or not-so-young!) ADHDers prematurely ruling out jobs they might be good at simply because they involve sitting at a desk or doing detailed or somewhat repetitive work... As eeyore noted, sometimes those jobs can also be a fit for an individual person with ADHD.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 04:48 AM
It's important to everyone! But definitely something to keep in mind as it relates to your own needs as someone with ADHD
To say that the environment is important to everyone somehow weakens the level of impact on the ADDer. With a porous brain, noise bothers us. We can't block it out. When someone drops a pencil in the next office or a car drives by the window, the ADDer will hear it.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 04:57 AM
As for making a rule-based list of characteristics to avoid in a job -- I'm not sure it can be done in a way that's universally applicable to "all" ADHDers.
Most things in life aren't universal. Those characteristics are a good guide. My ADD coach taught me that ADDers hate doing the same things over and over again (repitition). The others were added by me from my experience or the ADDitude article.

I see a new thread on someone getting canned almost every time I get on here.:( Considering this truth, I think making a list is worth the risk.

namazu
12-25-15, 04:57 AM
To say that the environment is important to everyone somehow weakens the level of impact on the ADDer. With a porous brain, noise bothers us. We can't block it out. When someone drops a pencil in the next office or a car drives by the window, the ADDer will hear it.

I agree, to a large extent, with what you've said here; as I noted in my post, ADHDers do need to consider the ways in which our ADHD interacts with our work environment (or potential work environment).

The comment you quoted was meant to expand on what was said above by eeyore: that no one -- ADHDer or not -- wants to work with a bunch of people who are jerks!

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 05:02 AM
The comment you quoted was meant to expand on what was said above by eeyore: that no one -- ADHDer or not -- wants to work with a bunch of people who are jerks!
I see. I was looking at the big picture, not just Eeyore's comment. Having a job that fits the individual is important for everyone, too. I think the point is that NTs can tolerate many things better than we can.

namazu
12-25-15, 05:05 AM
Most things in life aren't universal. Those characteristics are a good guide. My ADD coach taught me that ADDers hate doing the same things over and over again (repitition).
Some ADHDers do, some ADHDers don't.

Personally, I have a love-hate relationship with some kinds of repetitive work, as well as a love-hate relationship with structure. I love the freedom to be creative in my work, but sometimes I need someone to step in and give me some structure.

The others were added by me from my experience or the ADDitude article.

I see a new thread on someone getting canned almost every time I get on here. Considering this truth, I think making a list is worth the risk.
Fair enough.

I'm just pointing out that some of the ADHDers here who are employed have found success in jobs that, according to your list, they "shouldn't". I'm suggesting that the specifics of a job (and a person) may matter more than whether it's a "desk job" or involves "detailed work". And I'm also suggesting that some of the jobs that various lists I've seen claim are "great for ADHDers" aren't great for all ADHDers, or at least have (often hidden) aspects of the same "executive function" challenges that exist in other jobs. There's a really wide range of jobs in which ADHDers can succeed, if the job and their strengths/interests/abilities are aligned, and they can find ways to minimize the impact of their ADHD on their work.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 05:18 AM
I'm just pointing out that some of the ADHDers here who are employed have found success in jobs that, according to your list, they "shouldn't", and suggesting that the specifics of a job (and a person) may matter more than whether it's a "desk job" or involves "detailed work".
No one said we couldn't be successful at jobs with heavy repitition and detail work. I was promoted and given raises doing mechanical assembly work, something I never had the aptitude to do.

The key is to find job satisfaction. We need to start somewhere. I'm tired of seeing ADDers endlessly suffering because of a lack of tools or knowledge to combat their career struggles.

meadd823
12-25-15, 07:20 AM
What is good for the goose is NOT necessarily good for the gandar. I work a job that requires attention to detail but the detail I need to pay attention to is the type that grabs my attention any way. There is a difference between noticing some one looks pale, has a had time walking, or is close to fainting than noticing proper spelling, or the amount of dust on a mantle.

I often notice cats others do not even see. Choes at my work is when my abilities shine, I have yet to find any job that is totally devoid of repetition.

The key is discovering your own limitations , learning what floats your individual boat, then accepting the fact that others are not the same.

Being A DVD does not eliminate my individuality it is Simply part of it.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 11:29 AM
What is good for the goose is NOT necessarily good for the gandar. I work a job that requires attention to detail but the detail I need to pay attention to is the type that grabs my attention any way. There is a difference between noticing some one looks pale, has a had time walking, or is close to fainting than noticing proper spelling, or the amount of dust on a mantle.

I often notice cats others do not even see. Choes at my work is when my abilities shine, I have yet to find any job that is totally devoid of repetition.

The key is discovering your own limitations , learning what floats your individual boat, then accepting the fact that others are not the same.

Being A DVD does not eliminate my individuality it is Simply part of it.
Thanks for making that clear, Meadd. Using your logic, not everyone has had your experiences.

This is amazing. Every day people post about getting fired and not being able to hold down a job. Yet, people feel the need to make sure no ones individual case is excluded.

I'm glad you have a job that meets your needs and the difficulties that come with ADD are tolerable, but what about the rest of us?

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 11:40 AM
The key is discovering your own limitations , learning what floats your individual boat, then accepting the fact that others are not the same.
I must be an idiot then. Will you be there to coach every single one of us into your methods of discovering the perfect career? Remember Meadd, what's good for the goose is not good for the gander. Many of us aren't as smart as you. That's why we lose jobs like change through a hole-laden pocket.

I'm talking about the vast majority of us. Not one single case study.

Unmanagable
12-25-15, 11:42 AM
I was unable to open the link you connected to the article. Keep getting "server not found" message.

I don't think anyone is trying to say you are incorrect or way off base in trying to help plant seeds of ideas to take into consideration while job seeking that may, or may not, work for some.

It feels, to me, like they're just reminding us that there is no across the board set of rules for each person with adhd. Just as our symptoms and struggles are unique to each individual, so are our needs in the work place.

It's great to heighten awareness and get trains of thought to leave the station, but what works for one can literally drive another insane.

There again, speaking from personal experience, the only sure way to figure out what works best is by diving deeply into self to learn our actual needs vs. what we've been taught they "should" be, then navigating the terrain as best we can.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 11:48 AM
I was unable to open the link you connected to the article. Keep getting "server not found" message.

I don't think anyone is trying to say you are incorrect or way off base in trying to help plant seeds of ideas to take into consideration while job seeking that may, or may not, work for some.

It feels, to me, like they're just reminding us that there is no across the board set of rules for each person with adhd. Just as our symptoms and struggles are unique to each individual, so are our needs in the work place.

It's great to heighten awareness and get trains of thought to leave the station, but what works for one can literally drive another insane.

There again, speaking from personal experience, the only sure way to figure out what works best is by diving deeply into self to learn our actual needs vs. what we've been taught they "should" be, then navigating the terrain as best we can.
There will always be one case or two or three etc. I'm trying to aid in the discovery process and overall, staying away from those characteristics is a freaking good start.

I'm glad we have so many all stars here who've never been fired from a job. Of course that's not what the evidence suggests by the experiences of the membership here.

Unmanagable
12-25-15, 11:53 AM
All stars, ay? Emotional responses and name calling won't further any discussion. Thanks for bringing awareness to the subject. It's an issue worth looking at from all angles, including the ones we may not be able to see ourselves. Hope you find peace with it.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 11:56 AM
All stars, ay? Emotional responses and name calling won't further any discussion. Thanks for bringing awareness to the subject. It's an issue worth looking at from all angles, including the ones we may not be able to see ourselves. Hope you find peace with it.
I'm just speaking the truth. It must be so simple to find a job that we don't need a thread like this.

Unmanagable
12-25-15, 12:06 PM
I'm just speaking the truth. It must be so simple to find a job that we don't need a thread like this.

No one stated we don't need a thread like this, anon, that I recall reading. Folks just seemed to be reminding you that your tips won't work for everyone with adhd, as your wording may have seemed to indicate in the brains of some of those reading and responding. However, that's only my interpretation. As with everything else, each one of those are different, too.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 12:11 PM
No one stated we don't need a thread like this, anon, that I recall reading. Folks just seemed to be reminding you that your tips won't work for everyone with adhd, as your wording may have seemed to indicate in the brains of some of those reading and responding. However, that's only my interpretation. As with everything else, each one of those are different, too.
The vast majority of ADDers have work issues and the major replies to this thread have been that these don't work for everyone? Doesn't make much sense to me.

Unmanagable
12-25-15, 12:29 PM
Does it make sense to you when something I say works for me, yet doesn't work for you when it comes to meditation, mindfulness, and breath work? Does everything anyone suggests you try that helps folks with adhd bring you clarity and success? Same thing with what you suggest here. It won't work for everyone, period.

And that's all I was interpreting from what others were responding with and trying to say, and in some responses, clearly stated. Best of luck in coming to terms with whatever feels off to you about it. Our feelings often become our filter when taking in information. That doesn't make our feelings wrong, at all, it should only serve to help us examine our thinking.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 12:34 PM
Does it make sense to you when something I say works for me, yet doesn't work for you when it comes to meditation, mindfulness, and breath work? Does everything anyone suggests you try that helps folks with adhd bring you clarity and success? Same thing with what you suggest here. It won't work for everyone, period.

And that's all I was interpreting from what others were responding with and trying to say, and in some responses, clearly stated. Best of luck in coming to terms with whatever feels off to you about it. Our feelings often become our filter when taking in information. That doesn't make our feelings wrong, at all, it should only serve to help us examine our thinking.
I don't want the feelings of a few to negate the vast majority of our experiences. It's in our best interests to stay away from a desk job and doing the same things over and over again. It's not my opinion.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 12:38 PM
I'm sorry that there was a bad link. I'm trying to find the article again.

Unmanagable
12-25-15, 12:38 PM
Then just hang tight for the majority to arrive and talk to you about it. Peace out, homey.

anonymouslyadd
12-25-15, 01:15 PM
I'm sorry for my quick responses.:o I was baffled by the opposition for what I felt to be a great starting point for us. I just want to see people with ADD suffer less and enjoy life more.

namazu
12-25-15, 07:46 PM
I just want to see people with ADD suffer less and enjoy life more.

So do I!

And my guess would be that other forum members do, too.


I agree with several of the factual points you've made, for example:
- Many ADHDers struggle with employment.
- Executive function weaknesses in areas like organization and planning and motivation and attention are common in ADHDers.
- These weaknesses can cause difficulties in finding and keeping a suitable job.


What I'm suggesting is that most jobs have some element(s) that draw on executive functions, to varying extents and with varying tolerance for failure. If we look at the mere presence of these components as a general disqualifier in considering a job or career, we may prematurely rule out jobs that we could do well and even enjoy.

On the flip-side, some jobs that are sometimes claimed to be "ideal" for the ADHDer (e.g. entrepreneur, salesperson) may be ill-suited to any given ADHDer's talents or interests, and they may pose (hidden? only later apparent?) challenges to the same weak executive function skills that cause trouble in other jobs. (Be your own boss! :yes: ---> Be your own boss! :eek:)

ADHDers, as a group, can succeed -- and fail -- in a wide variety of jobs.

I'm not saying that ADHDers should go looking for trouble by seeking out jobs that draw primarily on their weakest skills! I'm not saying that every ADHDer needs to consider desk jobs or repetitive work, if those things would drive them nuts or be impossible for them.

For an ADHDer trying to find a healthy and sustainable employment niche in a difficult job market, keeping our options flexible and looking beyond generic job descriptions and assumptions about what they entail may yield more opportunities.

In some jobs/careers that your list would otherwise discourage, there may be simple (or less simple) ways around the difficult areas that could make the job work out well, which we'd never figure out if we crossed off all those jobs without further consideration. And in some jobs that would pass your sniff test with flying colors, you may find out later (to your dismay) that the job requires components you didn't anticipate and that don't mesh well with what you thought you'd signed up for.

It's kind of like having a wish-list of characteristics for your ideal romantic partner or your ideal house. Yes, there may be some characteristics that are non-negotiable. But sometimes "perfect matches" on paper can turn out to be duds. And sometimes we end up falling for someone or some place that surprises us, or comes across much better in person -- not ideal perfection, necessarily but perhaps warm, quirky charm. If our criteria are too rigid, we might miss out on a good thing. Like you said, sometimes there's some excitement that can make up for one or two negatives...

So -- in sum, you're absolutely right that ADHDers tend to struggle to find and keep jobs because of difficulties with executive function skills, including the ones you mentioned. Considering our needs and our environment is incredibly important, and not trying to fit our round pegs into square holes is often good advice. Still, success (or avoidance of failure) is difficult to reduce to a universal formula. (And some ADHDers hate being told what to do or what not to do! ;) )

That shouldn't stop you from sharing your personal experience and letting it guide you. I hope you (and the rest of us!) are able to find/create success and fulfillment in the coming year. :grouphug:

Lunacie
12-25-15, 09:08 PM
The job I have now is a good fit for me.

It is repetitious, I do the same things every week but I can do them in any order that appeals to me.

I work all by myself without people distracting me all the time.

I don't have a boss looking over my shoulder all the time.

meadd823
12-25-15, 09:39 PM
I must be an idiot then. Will you be there to coach every single one of us into your methods of discovering the perfect career? Remember Meadd, what's good for the goose is not good for the gander. Many of us aren't as smart as you. That's why we lose jobs like change through a hole-laden pocket.

I'm talking about the vast majority of us. Not one single case study.

:scratch: WTF, Are you intending to be rude? I was doing the best I could seeing as the "here" link lead me no where.

I am not interested in coaching anyone for any reason if I was that is what I would be doing.

YOU discover YOUR weakness and strengths, which may or may not be the same as mine. It is YOUR job to discover what works for you. I have worked my a** off learning what works for me and what does not


You listed detail orientated as being a thing to avoid. My intention was to point out that there are variations to detail orientation. Some thing I notice naturally while other things completely allude me. Some of us tune out of life completely daze off while other members get assaulted by it. Some folks whither in fast pace places where as other folks thrive.

Every one experiences their own ADD as part of their entire being. Each person post according to their own experiences, the fact that my experiences are different than your does not make me any better or any worse it simply makes me different.

I find it interesting that based on your response it was not a consideration that those of us who are enjoying success may be doing so because we learned from our past failures.


I doubt I am any smarter than any one else what I am is determined to live my life the way I want to live. I am assuming most folks here want the same thing regardless of the specification of said life style preferences.


Frankly your rude behavior bewilders me. You act like success is some sort of reason to be ashamed. I get from your post that I should be verbally punished because I have done what others want to do. I quit resenting those who were successful and started learning from them





......

anonymouslyadd
12-26-15, 12:25 AM
Frankly your rude behavior bewilders me. You act like success is some sort of reason to be ashamed. I get from your post that I should be verbally punished because I have done what others want to do. I quit resenting those who were successful and started learning from them
You have me pegged! I hate your success!

The point of this thread is that the vast majority of us don't know what jobs to avoid and stay away from. The point to this thread is not to magnify every single ******* exception so that the purpose of the thread is muffled! A good starting point is to understand what to avoid in a job. Are there exceptions to the rule, of course.

Unmanagable
12-26-15, 08:58 AM
You have me pegged! I hate your success!

The point of this thread is that the vast majority of us don't know what jobs to avoid and stay away from. The point to this thread is not to magnify every single ******* exception so that the purpose of the thread is muffled! A good starting point is to understand what to avoid in a job. Are there exceptions to the rule, of course.

If you don't want opinions from every point of view, you should clearly state that in your OP so people who may have differing opinions from yours, that are also clearly discussing the topic that was initiated, will know not to waste their time responding only to be met with hatefulness.

intothewind
12-26-15, 08:44 PM
I think the most important thing for me is that mistakes that are easily made be of little consequence.

anonymouslyadd
12-27-15, 12:06 AM
This is the article I referenced in my OP.

http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/173/slide-1.html

dvdnvwls
12-27-15, 12:11 AM
... some jobs that are sometimes claimed to be "ideal" for the ADHDer (e.g. entrepreneur, salesperson) ...
I hadn't heard this stated so clearly before.

Me as a salesman would be an unmitigated disaster.

anonymouslyadd
12-27-15, 12:33 AM
I found a career aptitude test here (http://http://www.rasmussen.edu/resources/aptitude-test/).

BellaVita
12-27-15, 04:18 AM
ADDers always want to know which job is the best for them. It's hard to tell if one career is better than another, but there are characteristics of a job that we should avoid.

With the help of an ADDitude article here (http://http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/173/slide-1.html), I compiled a list of five job components all ADDers should avoid:

1. Repetition
2. Strong organizational skills
3. Desk jobs
4. Strong attention to detail
5. Excessive planning

One or two of these characteristics may become acceptable should their be something that excites the ADDer. Of course, things are rarely conclusive, but I believe this list is a good start!

Just now reading this thread. :)

I guess my combination of autism and ADHD make it so I'm like the opposite...

But jobs that are repetitive, require strong attention to detail, and planning are what I tend to go for and find to be the most manageable...

In fact, for me, the more repetitive it is, often the better it is.

But my hyperactivity side does make me require a NON sit-down job...something physical or moving around somewhat is best for me.

PolaBear
01-02-16, 06:29 PM
Random thoughts based on my situation

I hate the idea of a desk/cubicle job
I don't work well in a structure or hierarchy, had issues with every supervisor/manager
If the environment isn't creative, not necessarily on topic, just expressive, I end up feeling caged which gets me angry and depressed.
How someone can spend a lot of hours doing something like insurance/finance anything like that I can't understand, I mean good for them if it works for them but I ain't interested and can't fake interest!
I'm not a suit/tie person, let's all be drones doesn't do it for me.
Business talk, weird phrases and semantics blows my mind, I just talk.
Like I said, I talk, a lot, staying in one place or having to be quiet becomes uncomfortable, fast. Sometimes I look at people, suit tie, not really talking for themselves just saying company talk and think how have you ended up in that frame of mind that this is how it is (again my problem I know)
How anyone can do something for 50 hours plus a week I just can't get, I mean how can one thing dominate so much of your life? I like sports, music, girls, tv, films, vacations, trips too, that what the work is for, to enhance that, ain't it?

Apart from all that no issues! (Maybe)

Sudano68
01-02-16, 07:45 PM
I think having ADHD and a job that requires paying extreme attention to detail and repetition is actually better, for me at least. I usually notice the little details rather than the big picture anyways, and the repetition helps me learn something better and have time to find ways to improve the technique and make it more efficient.

Where I'm at during work changes depending on where I'm scheduled, but I definitely like to be moving around rather than sitting in a chair, but I think thats normal for ADHD.

Luckily I don't have to do much planning for me job, because that's one of my biggest weakness' for sure so I agree with you there.

Sitting in a cubicle as an adult with ADHD is my idea of what hell is like, especially if you have to deal with annoying coworkers. I'm happy that at my job we can joke around (to a certain extent) and don't have to worry about those annoying office rules.


I think one of my biggest issues is that working does help me because it gives my routine some structure, but it also makes it harder for me to do anything else in my spare time because it takes up most of my focus. I forget to do a lot of other things because I feel like I don't have enough free time.

DJ Bill
01-02-16, 08:26 PM
I found a career aptitude test here (http://www.rasmussen.edu/resources/aptitude-test/).

You had one too many http:// in your link..:) I fixed it in the quote above.

sarahsweets
01-03-16, 05:42 AM
I am conflicted in general with this thread. Anon, your list seems spot on BUT then I think of my own life and when I worked if I was good at the jobs I had and its complicated. The only job I ever had that I was also good at was being a dispatcher for an airport car service. I stumbled upon the job after the last employment disaster. I started out being a reservationist and was promoted to dispatch. Back then, it was hardly computerized. The count sheets were all handwritten and tallied and I had to keep an eye on my drivers at two airports, their passenger amounts and whether or not traffic f'd up their route. I still have NO idea why, out of all the jobs I had, this one worked. I have an English degree and any job I tried that actually involved using it I quit or was fired from. This job had no degree requirements but somehow I did it.
The thing is, like all of my employment history it didnt last beyond 18 months.
This is because the attention to detail and excitement of the job wore off. It lasted way longer than I expected it to, but overall it didnt have any longevity. Once that happened I started making tons of mistakes and missing work. Combine that with being a mom to young kids and having bipolar muck things up and it just didnt work out.

Looking at it this way, for me, your list may not have applied in the beginning but in the end, it did seem to apply. Do I make any sense? I mean that temporarily or on the surface I could say that I dont identify with your list but looking at the outcome and impact I did.

DJ Bill
01-03-16, 09:53 AM
I think if we were to condense the thread....we would have to say:


"Your mileage may vary."

IE Not everyone will find the list applicable because as people, especially ADHD People, we are all uniquely made with minds that are no always identical.

Still it is good to consider these kinds of things when thinking about employment.

acdc01
01-04-16, 01:37 AM
I don't think I agree with your list. Only 2 and 4 apply to me and I'm sure I'm far from the only one who doesn't match that list.

I think the list should be to find a job:

1. you love doing
2. filled with coworkers you love working with
3. in a work environment you enjoy working in
4. With the number of hours you wish to work
5. where you won't have to perform many tasks you're weaker in
6. where you can spend more time on tasks you're good at
7. provides you with the salary amount and job security/outlook level you need to be happy

Then you need to really understand yourself and the job you're applying for so you can make sure you're meeting the above criteria. I think your list is good when it comes to helping us understand what our weaknesses might be (though not all of us have the same weaknesses).

dvdnvwls
01-04-16, 03:27 AM
acdc01: I agree with your list, when it's used as an ideal to compare real jobs to. I would also idealize the items that you relativized, just to make it consistent:

5. where you never have to perform any tasks you're weaker in

6. where you spend the whole time on tasks you're good at

7. provides you with lots of money and excellent job security/outlook


... and then I would say "These list items are an ideal to shoot for. No real job could deliver every item on the list perfectly, but a good job will deliver each of them well enough to satisfy you."

For example, a person might find a job where he doesn't love working with every one of his co-workers, but at least no one hates him, he likes some of the people, and he can do his job in peace - and that's enough to satisfy him as far as item 1 is concerned.

PolaBear
01-10-16, 11:45 AM
I am conflicted in general with this thread. Anon, your list seems spot on BUT then I think of my own life and when I worked if I was good at the jobs I had and its complicated. The only job I ever had that I was also good at was being a dispatcher for an airport car service. I stumbled upon the job after the last employment disaster. I started out being a reservationist and was promoted to dispatch. Back then, it was hardly computerized. The count sheets were all handwritten and tallied and I had to keep an eye on my drivers at two airports, their passenger amounts and whether or not traffic f'd up their route. I still have NO idea why, out of all the jobs I had, this one worked. I have an English degree and any job I tried that actually involved using it I quit or was fired from. This job had no degree requirements but somehow I did it.
The thing is, like all of my employment history it didnt last beyond 18 months.
This is because the attention to detail and excitement of the job wore off. It lasted way longer than I expected it to, but overall it didnt have any longevity. Once that happened I started making tons of mistakes and missing work. Combine that with being a mom to young kids and having bipolar muck things up and it just didnt work out.

Looking at it this way, for me, your list may not have applied in the beginning but in the end, it did seem to apply. Do I make any sense? I mean that temporarily or on the surface I could say that I dont identify with your list but looking at the outcome and impact I did.

Only noticed this post now, but can definitely get with this. Makes even looking at jobs difficult, as once you relate or read it the novelty part makes you excited towards it even if it is completely wrong (or right), then once that wears off your mind goes on to some other novelty thing, while what you were doing then just becomes something else that is monotony, so mistakes and hate towards it happen.

In one place I worked, I was moved around 11 times, so I know about this feeling!

InvitroCanibal
01-24-16, 04:41 AM
Interesting topic, but I like repetitious jobs like commercial fishing and roofing as I can daydream and work at the same time.

Me too, well...sometimes

InvitroCanibal
01-24-16, 04:49 AM
I tend to just need to be interested in something and I will wince through repetition if it carries the mark of challenge and mystery.

Every day is a Nancy Drew novel

anonymouslyadd
01-24-16, 12:44 PM
The intent of this thread was to start a conversation about something very important. I'm a little unsure why there has been so much opposition, considering all of the trouble ADDers, including myself, have on the job.

I still think that the list is a good starting point and something we should pay attention to.

I was promoted and received raises in jobs I was ill-suited for. Those jobs were repetitious, had me sitting down, etc. The ADD brain can do many things and that includes repitition. However, it doesn't mean that we should seek out jobs like this. I was miserable at the mechanical job I had and the repetitive portion of it probably didn't help. Of course other factors, like the environment, played a part, too.

Little Missy
01-24-16, 01:25 PM
Sitting at a desk - forget it, I have run around aimlessly whenever the mood hits.

Bad music or no music - fosters an environment of no work being done at all

Rules against laughing loudly makes me laugh louder and harder.

Keeping hair contained and neat. Too difficult and downright impossible at times.

Bathroom breaks only at break time. Yeah right, try that on meds.

Eight hour day = three hours of productivity if plenty is going on and five hours of fooling around because after three hours I'm done.

Pilgrim
01-24-16, 02:19 PM
Having no investment of the soul in your endeavour, the ability of foresight and forethought ,
and the belief in the wisdom of what you do.

aeon
01-24-16, 03:39 PM
1. Repetition
2. Strong organizational skills
3. Desk jobs
4. Strong attention to detail
5. Excessive planning

I now have a job that avoids all five of the above, and it is (for me), absolutely glorious! :yes:

Cheers,
Ian

InvitroCanibal
01-31-16, 02:56 AM
The intent of this thread was to start a conversation about something very important. I'm a little unsure why there has been so much opposition, considering all of the trouble ADDers, including myself, have on the job.

I still think that the list is a good starting point and something we should pay attention to.

I was promoted and received raises in jobs I was ill-suited for. Those jobs were repetitious, had me sitting down, etc. The ADD brain can do many things and that includes repitition. However, it doesn't mean that we should seek out jobs like this. I was miserable at the mechanical job I had and the repetitive portion of it probably didn't help. Of course other factors, like the environment, played a part, too.

I respect your intent, to answer your question, I believe people just want to define their own limitations.

What I got from what you said was to be aware of one's groups limitations. However, this is a problem as I don't define my limitations by the disorder but by its symptoms. The ones I have and express uniquely.

It was sort of a syllogistic fallacy you used. All dogs are mammals but not all mammals are dogs.

But I do respect your willingness to write that, and I did and am still thinking about it. I just need more time to think on it. Sometimes I can spend a year on one problem like this. So give me some time...

anonymouslyadd
04-02-16, 10:43 PM
I have a fantastic job opportunity in front of me. It contains many things I need to be successful on the job. Each employee has their own business and is responsible for all the activities concerning their business. There's not one place you go to work. You work in many different places and by yourself. Working alone is important to me, because I can be easily drained by people.

I struggle with negative environments, too. I guess the only time I could handle such a case would be if all of my other work needs were met. This new opportunity does not appear to have a negative environment.

Maybe it's too soon to tell, but I have my own space and am working with people, who actually want me to succeed. If I succeed, they'll succeed.

TheGreatKing
04-02-16, 10:59 PM
I must be an idiot then. Will you be there to coach every single one of us into your methods of discovering the perfect career? Remember Meadd, what's good for the goose is not good for the gander. Many of us aren't as smart as you. That's why we lose jobs like change through a hole-laden pocket.


I'm talking about the vast majority of us. Not one single case study.

I don't think he meant anything bad about what he said, correct me if i am wrong but its seems like a pretty negative comment that you just wrote.
There's no need to take offence. Lets stay positive everyone!
:grouphug:

anonymouslyadd
04-02-16, 11:03 PM
I don't think he meant anything bad about what he said, correct me if i am wrong but its seems like a pretty negative comment that you just wrote.
There's no need to take offence. Lets stay positive everyone!
:grouphug:
Thanks. I was having a rough time with a particular medicine and sometimes have difficulty accepting opinions differing from my own.

TheGreatKing
04-02-16, 11:10 PM
Thanks. I was having a rough time with a particular medicine and sometimes have a difficult time accepting opinions differing from my own.
we all do sometimes.
just wanted to remind everyone to keep it positive as possible.
There's enough hate for us in the world you know?
:grouphug:

daveddd
04-03-16, 01:16 AM
Thanks. I was having a rough time with a particular medicine and sometimes have difficulty accepting opinions differing from my own.

everyone one of us , no exceptions;) have our days like this



the list is spot on for me