View Full Version : How I Cured My Child's ADHD Without Drugs - great book


Sue Lifeisgood
01-08-16, 01:51 PM
Hello. Hope you are all fine! Want to share this wonderful book
ADHD to Honor Roll: How I Cured My Child's ADHD Without Drugs (And You Can, Too!) by Soozy Miller. Tells a real history about a mother who found different and natural ways to deal with her son's ADHD. I definetely recommend it to anyone looking for answers. :) :)

sarahsweets
01-10-16, 03:32 PM
Hello. Hope you are all fine! Want to share this wonderful book
ADHD to Honor Roll: How I Cured My Child's ADHD Without Drugs (And You Can, Too!) by Soozy Miller. Tells a real history about a mother who found different and natural ways to deal with her son's ADHD. I definetely recommend it to anyone looking for answers. :) :)
Why would you ever recommend anything that is promoted as a cure for a scientifically proven incurable chronic condition?

BellaVita
01-10-16, 03:46 PM
Hello, I know you probably were just trying to be helpful in the OP, but unfortunately there is no cure for ADHD and that book is filled with lies to make money.

The only answer is: the first-line treatment for ADHD is stimulant medication.

Therapy can be helpful too.

ADHD has no cure and nothing "natural" or any form of supplementation will ever make it go away.

dvdnvwls
01-10-16, 03:50 PM
I definetely recommend it to anyone looking for answers. :) :)
The book is certainly full of "answers", but unfortunately (since the writer was not asking any intelligent questions) those answers are worthless.

mctavish23
01-10-16, 05:33 PM
What they ^^ (respectfully) said.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Little Missy
01-10-16, 05:49 PM
Hello. Hope you are all fine! Want to share this wonderful book
ADHD to Honor Roll: How I Cured My Child's ADHD Without Drugs (And You Can, Too!) by Soozy Miller. Tells a real history about a mother who found different and natural ways to deal with her son's ADHD. I definetely recommend it to anyone looking for answers. :) :)

Did it work for you too?

Lunacie
01-10-16, 06:44 PM
The author's biography says "... the work I did to naturally heal my son of his behavioral issues."

Behavior issues are only part of the disorder of ADHD.

Not so long ago ADHD was categorized as a behavioral disorder, but with better scientific information we learned that it's actually a neurological disorder that affects our behavior.

We have some wonderful information right here on this forum about dealing with ADHD behaviors and helping our children overcome them.

They are very helpgul ... but they don't change or "cure" the underlying neurobiological brain differences.


You won't sell your book to many parents on this forum, Spammer Sue/Soozy. :rolleyes:

aeon
01-11-16, 12:50 AM
If Soozy cured it, it means her son never had it.

More fearmongering, uncertainty, doubt, and BS, all in an effort to make a buck.

Itís sick, I tell yaí, trying to profit from human pain and suffering. That might even be my working definition of evil.

Take your book, your recommendation, and whatever other lies you are peddling, and kindly GTFO.


Cheers,
Ian

dvdnvwls
01-11-16, 02:36 AM
By the way, I had ADHD which was completely untreated, and I was the top student in my high school. So - Soozy - all the bogus claims you're making are not even things you can take credit for.

CanadianDad
01-11-16, 09:51 AM
New user. Only post. Unverified, indeed unverifiable information.

Personally, I come here for the support of other parents with children who have ADHD, along with insight of adults who have it so I can see what may lie in his future.

I do not come here for unscientific BS preying on desperate parents to make a buck.

ccom5100
01-16-16, 03:32 PM
I don't know what treatment is offered in the book; however, often times, adhd is misdiagnosed. The person may have symptoms that point to adhd, but actually be caused by something other than adhd. It is important to know what those conditions are and to rule them out before blindly accepting a diagnosis of adhd. Here are examples: http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/20-health-conditions-that-mimic-adhd/

Sometimes adhd is also exacerbated by other factors, like allergies, food intolerance, environmental issues, etc. We follow the Feingold diet, which eliminates foods containing petro-chemicals which have been proven to cause or exacerbate adhd symptoms. We were able to avoid using meds until ds reached puberty. Then, when we did add them, we found that because of his diet, he needed a much lower dosage than other kids his age.

So, while there may be no cure for adhd, there are certainly other conditions that mimic adhd that can be cured by changing diet adding certain supplements, eliminating environmental cuases, etc.

mildadhd
01-17-16, 01:09 PM
Never read the book. 1 in 6 people do grow out of ADHD over a period of time. Maybe a important quote from the book, would help us understand, how you helped promote your child's brain development?

sarahsweets
01-17-16, 01:35 PM
Never read the book. 1 in 6 people do grow out of ADHD over a period of time. Maybe a important quote from the book, would help us understand, how you helped promote your child's brain development?

Sources?

mildadhd
01-17-16, 01:36 PM
5 out 6 people may not grow out of ADHD. :rolleyes:

mildadhd
01-17-16, 01:40 PM
Sources?

Paraphrasing Dr. Barkley "1 in 6" and possibly "1 in 3".

Lunacie
01-17-16, 01:52 PM
Never read the book. 1 in 6 people do grow out of ADHD over a period of time. Maybe a important quote from the book, would help us understand, how you helped promote your child's brain development?

Paraphrasing Dr. Barkley "1 in 6" and possibly "1 in 3".

Well ... yes and no. Interesting study done at MIT using fMRI tests shows that those who seem to have outgrown childhood ADHD have resting brain connections like those without any ADHD, but still show poor connections for executive functioning like those with ADHD.

http://www.medicaldaily.com/adult-adhd-brain-shows-biological-differences-people-who-grew-out-disorder-287480

mildadhd
01-17-16, 02:04 PM
It makes sense that if a slightly immature brain, developed, then would look like a more mature brain.

Socaljaxs
01-17-16, 03:26 PM
You won't sell your book to many parents on this forum, Spammer Sue/Soozy. :rolleyes: I thought the exact same thing. A chick coming on here promoting her book. Names are too close. Not disclosing the truth of her agenda, by advertising it. At least use the common decencies to admit you wrote it. Not pretend this book is something you randomly came across. False advertisement does not help you sell books to people that have spent time researching and understanding. You many think the uneducated may be your audience along with the individual that don't want to medicate your child, but to come here and claim a book to advertise it is just wrong.:mad:

mildadhd
01-18-16, 12:07 AM
It is completely possible some people prefer treatment with medication and some people prefer treatment without medication. Medication is never the only form of treatment. What else does treatment consist of, besides possibly medication?

aeon
01-18-16, 12:26 AM
It is completely possible some people prefer treatment with medication and some people prefer treatment without medication.

Sure.

I prefer what has the greatest clinical record of working across the largest sample of people if it also works for me.

Thatís medication, and specifically for my case, amphetamine.

There are other forms of treatment. Iíve tried a few...none of them did a thing for me other than waste my time and money.

Phenethylamines for a brighter future! :yes:


Cheers,
Ian

mildadhd
01-18-16, 12:37 AM
The book considers "factors such as environmental, emotional, physical, nutritional, and habitual influences." We should be at least considering these factors in treatment whether we decide to take medication, or not.

Socaljaxs
01-18-16, 12:41 AM
The book considers "factors such as environmental, emotional, physical, nutritional, and habitual influences." We should be considering these factors in treatment whether we decide to take medication, or not.

Who says people aren't? As a child, I remember very clearly that my diet was considered and modified. When I got rediagnosed my physical and emotional stability was examined as well to determine how much it impacted.. Habits are worked on as well.. While some yes just use and seek medication, other do go beyond medication and get help to change and work on changes to lifestyle as well.

mildadhd
01-18-16, 12:55 AM
Who says people aren't? As a child, I remember very clearly that my diet was considered and modified. When I got rediagnosed my physical and emotional stability was examined as well to determine how much it impacted.. Habits are worked on as well.. While some yes just use and seek medication, other do go beyond medication and get help to change and work on changes to lifestyle as well.

So if I was a person who has ADHD but did not choose to take medication (hypothetically), or looking for treatment along side medication might like the book in regards to treatment?

Socaljaxs
01-18-16, 02:01 AM
So if I was a person who has ADHD but did not choose to take medication (hypothetically), or looking for treatment along side medication might like the book in regards to treatment?

Elaborate?

First thing I noticed when doing a google search, this lady had already been going on multiple sites with out disclosing her agenda, which is book sales. She is the author, and she should be disclosing that not falsely claiming a good read for people.. Second , the reviews for the book reflect that the book is not a good resource for someone with an ADHD child. Last time I checked advertisement are not aloud on the forum as well. She is self promoting not 3 red party reviewing.. Big difference

Third she is not a creditable source... Her opinion is not based on proven research or anything that has backing so to prove her method.. She is a business writer and it states in her biography and her career is to write books. So with the false advertising the lack of resources and research, her lack of disclosure and the fact you cannot cure ADHD. Says to me this would not be a good source for a person to read that is seeking alternative and added treatment options for their child.

While I agree that their are tools and research available and other areas beyond just medication.(if someone was to medicate or not) such as nutrition and emotional and habits that should be addressed for coaching and coping and living with ADHD, this book would in my opinion not be a tool for parents. If anything when her opinion fails a parent may be discouraged at the child for the lack of improvement, instead of looking into the author and research and lack of proven ideas the book is addressing it can cause more harm in my opinion p

BellaVita
01-18-16, 02:03 AM
She hasn't come back since the same day she joined.

Looks like she just wanted to talk about her book and leave.

Socaljaxs
01-18-16, 02:14 AM
If you work with the right practitioner, and if you consider other factors such as environmental, emotional, physical, nutritional, and habitual influences, you will find the root of the problem. You can heal your child forever-naturally-without giving your child unnecessary and harmful medicine. Healing your child naturally will feel better and will result in long-term benefits.


This is copied straight from the authors noted which what I bolded the big concern I, having which says there is a root to the problem as an outside fixable source. That says for me at least, that ADHD is not a real disorder and the problem is actually something a parent or their child's lifestyle is the blame of it

aeon
01-18-16, 09:49 AM
So if I was a person who has ADHD but did not choose to take medication (hypothetically), or looking for treatment along side medication might like the book in regards to treatment?

If you were seduced by the FUD, sure.

But if there were alternatives to medication that were efficacious and could be implemented in a reasonable fashion, we would know about them by now.


Cheers,
Ian

sarahsweets
01-18-16, 11:52 AM
If you were seduced by the FUD, sure.

But if there were alternatives to medication that were efficacious and could be implemented in a reasonable fashion, we would know about them by now.


Cheers,
Ian

Are you sure its not just a conspiracy by Big Pharma to keep us all on drugs and avoid any other interventions because of the giant profits being raked in on the backs of people with adhd?
;)

mctavish23
01-18-16, 01:53 PM
I'm saaad. These people (OP) always leave before we can properly "discuss"

their "views" :umm1: in more "detail" :eek:

Oh well :lol:

U R Welcome :cool:

mildadhd
01-18-16, 10:26 PM
I can not focus and read a measuring tape without methylphenidate. Environmental, emotional, physical, nutritional..are extremely important treatment factors to dismiss.

Socaljaxs
01-18-16, 10:55 PM
I can not focus and read a measuring tape without methylphenidate. Environmental, emotional, physical, nutritional..are extremely important treatment factors to dismiss.

Huh? Can you expand on this? It's a little confusing. Are you saying without meds you can't focus, but the other extremely important factors are to dismiss?it's confusing what you wrote.

mctavish23
01-18-16, 11:30 PM
Russ Barkely said it best (regarding the subject of what constitutes real "treatment" for

ADHD, from years of evidence based (derived & supported by peer reviewed research),

when he said, "Subjective, personal opinion is not statistically significant."

U R Welcome :cool:

mildadhd
01-19-16, 12:38 AM
Russ Barkely said it best (regarding the subject of what constitutes real "treatment" for

ADHD, from years of evidence based (derived & supported by peer reviewed research),

when he said, "Subjective, personal opinion is not statistically significant."

U R Welcome :cool:

You don't think that the environment, emotional, physical, nutritional, habits, are important topics to consider in regards to ADHD treatment?

mildadhd
01-19-16, 12:44 AM
I take medication, I also consider other environmental and emotional, and nutritional factors, etc, as very important parts of ADHD treatment.

aeon
01-19-16, 12:47 AM
You don't think that the environment, emotional, physical, nutritional, habits, are important topics to consider in regards to ADHD treatment?

Theyíre absolutely important, but not to the exclusion of medication, and medication is rightly assigned primacy among avenues of treatment for ADHD.


Cheers,
Ian

sarahsweets
01-19-16, 05:49 AM
You don't think that the environment, emotional, physical, nutritional, habits, are important topics to consider in regards to ADHD treatment?

No one said that. Considering other resources is different then endorsing them.

Unmanagable
01-19-16, 11:18 AM
I have to laugh each time this thread pops up. Now I'm also a contributor to the marketing attempt and feel kind of dirty.

I wonder how many books she's sold since the thread keeps popping up? Pretty clever mass marketing, albeit shady and unethical as hell in the presentation and intent.

Yet another shining example of things people will stoop to in trying to survive financially in this twisted world.

Just imagine what having more power, money, and ability to reach the masses allows corporations and stuff to do to "persuade" us all.

But how often do most of us question and dissect so thoroughly what we've been taught and are immersed in on a regular basis?

Things that make me go hmmmmmmmmmmm............

BellaVita
01-19-16, 03:37 PM
I have to laugh each time this thread pops up. Now I'm also a contributor to the marketing attempt and feel kind of dirty.

I wonder how many books she's sold since the thread keeps popping up? Pretty clever mass marketing, albeit shady and unethical as hell in the presentation and intent.

Yet another shining example of things people will stoop to in trying to survive financially in this twisted world.

Just imagine what having more power, money, and ability to reach the masses allows corporations and stuff to do to "persuade" us all.

But how often do most of us question and dissect so thoroughly what we've been taught and are immersed in on a regular basis?

Things that make me go hmmmmmmmmmmm............

Yep. All very good points.

I don't trust the media, not even for a second.

mildadhd
01-19-16, 09:45 PM
Some points I am trying to express..

-the general factors the author recommends considering may appear to "cure" approximately 1 in 6 people diagnosed with ADHD

-the general factors the author recommends considering may also help lessen the suffering of the other 5 in 6 that do not grow out of ADHD impairment.

-I benefit from medication, but some people with ADHD do not. There are people with moderate/severe cases of ADHD that do not take medication, that would benefit from the general list of treatment factors the author recommends considering.

-taking medication is the most subjective form of ADHD treatment. I have not read the book but I know the general factors the author lists are involved in treatment of ADHD, as well.

-the author makes the case that ADHD medication is promoted sadly as the only form of ADHD treatment.

-sadly the author does not recognize the benefits of medication for some people, as far as I know?

Lunacie
01-19-16, 10:07 PM
Some points I am trying to express..

-the general factors the author recommends may appear to "cure" approximately 1 in 6 people diagnosed with ADHD

-the general factors the author recommends may also help lessen the suffering of the other 5 in 6 that do not grow out of ADHD.

-I benefit from medication, but some people with ADHD do not. There are people with moderate/severe cases of ADHD that do not take medication, that would benefit from the general list of treatment factors author recommend.

-taking medication is the most subjective form of ADHD treatment. I have not read the book but the general factors the author lists are involved in treatment of ADHD, as well.

-the author makes the case that ADHD medication is promoted as the only form of ADHD treatment.

-sadly the author does not recognize the treatment benefits of medication for some people.

Exactly, she starts from a false premise ... that we are being told that there is nothing else to do for ADHD beyond meds.

In my experience, docs and therapists are not pushing meds as the only line of treatment.

Anyone who has been on this forum for any time knows that meds do not "mask symptoms" as she claims, they enable better brain function.

mildadhd
01-19-16, 10:13 PM
Technically the general list of treatment factors should be explored before medication is prescribed. (or at least, along side with medication)

Lunacie
01-19-16, 10:22 PM
Technically the general list of treatment factors should be explored before medication is prescribed. (or at least, along side with medication)

Alongside, yes. Before, no.

Meds have been proven effective and relatively risk-free and should be considered as front-line treatment.

Research also shows that therapy alongside meds is even more effective.

Things like balanced diet, good sleep hygiene and exercise are certainly an appropriate recommendation alongside meds.

mctavish23
01-19-16, 10:48 PM
mild,

As a now retired, (former) Licensed Clinical / Child Psychologist in Mn., diagnosed with

ADHD in 1972, back when it was called "MBD (Minimal Brain Damage)," and who went on

to develop a 30 year evidence based ADHD outpatient specialty practice, by studying the

research for (approximately) 27 1/2 years before a stroke forced me into retirement in

Jan. of 2014, I KNOW that those (other) factors are strictly ancillary; in that they support

common comorbidities.


tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mildadhd
01-19-16, 11:52 PM
My ADHD is a comorbidity of my anxieties disorders.

Anxieties are my emotional feelings.

mctavish23
01-20-16, 05:15 PM
mild,

Very true. In fact, Anxiety Disorders have been found to be the #1 most common comorbid condition for Adult ADHD. Common sense suggests treating the "whole package," as far as all the various conditions are involved. That's why I always asked additional questions about possible Sensory concerns, as well. At the same time though, in order for someone with ADHD to really benefit from treatment, it's imperative that it (ADHD) be diagnosed; and treated appropriately.

My problem with this book is that there's No "Cure" for ADHD; only treatment. The single treatment shown to work best, is medication. Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mildadhd
01-20-16, 10:29 PM
mild,

Very true. In fact, Anxiety Disorders have been found to be the #1 most common comorbid condition for Adult ADHD. Common sense suggests treating the "whole package," as far as all the various conditions are involved. That's why I always asked additional questions about possible Sensory concerns, as well. At the same time though, in order for someone with ADHD to really benefit from treatment, it's imperative that it (ADHD) be diagnosed; and treated appropriately.

My problem with this book is that there's No "Cure" for ADHD; only treatment. The single treatment shown to work best, is medication. Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

My ADHD is a comorbid condition of my early anxious experiences.

Anxiety disorder is my primary condition.

Socaljaxs
01-20-16, 10:51 PM
Mild,

No one here is saying that other factors shouldn't Be explored, as well.. If it is a big difference once again (been echoed by others here in this thread as well) that it's the book itself we don't think should be endorsed for a number a reasons. The premise of the book is false and opinion of mine and others it will lead to failure of"curing a childhood ADHD. there,is a difference between controlling it and curing it..

I can say from my personal diagnosises both times.. My treatment both times.. At 10 and 32 was medication plus coaching( coaching includes lifestyle factors that need to be modified to control my severity....I do not have any other mental conditions to treat along with ADHD.

For you who had anxiety and says it's anxiety first ADHD after. Your treatment may and mos likely would be different that just treatment of on disorder

mildadhd
01-20-16, 11:42 PM
Mild,

No one here is saying that other factors shouldn't Be explored, as well.. If it is a big difference once again (been echoed by others here in this thread as well) that it's the book itself we don't think should be endorsed for a number a reasons. The premise of the book is false and opinion of mine and others it will lead to failure of"curing a childhood ADHD. there,is a difference between controlling it and curing it..

I can say from my personal diagnosises both times.. My treatment both times.. At 10 and 32 was medication plus coaching( coaching includes lifestyle factors that need to be modified to control my severity....I do not have any other mental conditions to treat along with ADHD.

For you who had anxiety and says it's anxiety first ADHD after. Your treatment may and mos likely would be different that just treatment of on disorder

Yes. Treatment for both anxieties and ADHD, starting about the age of 35.

If I was treated for anxiety from birth, there is the possibility that I may not have had a moderate ADHD impairment.

Socaljaxs
01-21-16, 12:05 AM
Yes. Treatment for both anxieties and ADHD, starting about the age of 35.

If I was treated for anxiety from birth, there is the possibility that I may not have had a moderate ADHD impairment.

Personally, I don't think so, anxiety did not create your ADHD. If anything made the symptoms be more apparent. But if you were treated younger most likely if you have ADHD. You would still have ADHD. Anxiety is not s causation of adhd.

mildadhd
01-21-16, 12:18 AM
Personally, I don't think so, anxiety did not create your ADHD. If anything made the symptoms be more apparent. But if you were treated younger most likely if you have ADHD. You would still have ADHD. Anxiety is not s causation of adhd.


Consider emotional consciousness at birth, and abnormal emotional distresses, and the natural order of early brain development, and the prefrontal growth spurt during the early years life. I will start another thread in the near future, in reply.

Edit: abnormal amounts of early emotional distresses, can interfere with early prefrontal development.

Mil-dad-hd

Greyhound1
01-21-16, 12:34 AM
Mild,
Perhaps you were born with ADHD and anxiety was the co-morbid catalyst causing noticeable impairment.

That is kinda my story. As an adult anxiety and OCD had become my bad coping skills for overcoming my ADHD pit falls and eventually became my down fall. Over a decade of failed attempts at treating just my anxiety lead to my ADHD diagnosis.

For me they are a package deal. Treating my ADHD helped so much more than anxiety alone.

aeon
01-21-16, 12:57 AM
Consider emotional consciousness at birth, and abnormal emotional distresses, and the natural order of early brain development, and the prefrontal growth spurt during the early years life. I will start another thread in the near future, in reply.

Edit: abnormal amounts of early emotional distresses, can interfere with early prefrontal development.

Bingo.

Though perhaps someday this will not be called ADHD, but included under e.g., Developmental Trauma Disorder, as per Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, and others.

At times, Iíve wondered about this in regards to myself.


Cheers,
Ian

mildadhd
01-21-16, 01:02 AM
All babies are more emotionally mature than cognitively mature. A baby can have anxious emotional experiences, but the same baby can not emotionally-self-regulate various types of emotional distresses. Abnormal emotionally distressful experiences can precede and interfere with the development of emotional-self-regulation.

mildadhd
01-21-16, 01:19 AM
Mild,
Perhaps you were born with ADHD and anxiety was the co-morbid catalyst causing noticeable impairment.

That is kinda my story. As an adult anxiety and OCD had become my bad coping skills for overcoming my ADHD pit falls and eventually became my down fall. Over a decade of failed attempts at treating just my anxiety lead to my ADHD diagnosis.

For me they are a package deal. Treating my ADHD helped so much more than anxiety alone.

Anxiety disorder (type of emotional distress) can be a causation factor of ADHD, and, a secondary anxiety comorbidity of ADHD.

Socaljaxs
01-21-16, 02:16 AM
Anxiety disorder (type of emotional distress) can be a causation factor of ADHD, and, a secondary anxiety comorbidity of ADHD.

What source did you get that from?

It would seem more the other way around in my opinion... Considering what I know about my ADHD... for me at least, I had none of the above as a baby or child, and and also no family history of anxiety either or any other mental impairment( only one family member in my large family has Asperger's/autism yet never formally diagnosed.. At her age I doubt anything would change at this point in her life since she is going to be 70 this year... However, my behaviors and ADHD symtoms are very much in line as genetic reasons for my ADHD. I don't know. I have multiple different family member on my mother's side that's have the same type of symtoms as myself.

Greyhound1
01-21-16, 07:57 AM
Anxiety disorder (type of emotional distress) can be a causation factor of ADHD, and, a secondary anxiety comorbidity of ADHD.

Sure but it's much more common the other way around.

Lunacie
01-21-16, 01:50 PM
Bingo.

Though perhaps someday this will not be called ADHD, but included under e.g., Developmental Trauma Disorder, as per Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, and others.

At times, Iíve wondered about this in regards to myself.


Cheers,
Ian

That's interesting. I'll look into that a bit.

mildadhd
01-21-16, 10:44 PM
Some people inherit a more emotionally hypersensitive temper. But not all people with ADHD need to be born with a emotionally hypersensitive temper, but have experienced more abnormal emotional distresses, during the prefrontal cortex's early life growth spurt. Origin is always at least, some combination of inherited temper and experiences. Focusing on development, origin and treatment.

mildadhd
01-21-16, 11:10 PM
Sure but it's much more common the other way around.

Like all humans, I can not explicitly remember my implicit memories occurring before the age of two, give or take, but I am lucky my early emotional experiences are documented both prenatal and postnatal.

Lunacie
01-21-16, 11:29 PM
Like all humans, I can not explicitly remember my implicit memories occurring before the age of two, give or take, but I am lucky my early emotional experiences are documented both prenatal and postnatal.

How can emotions be documented as experiences?

mildadhd
01-22-16, 12:21 AM
How can emotions be documented as experiences?

History of my postnatal and prenatal experiences where obviously emotionally distressful. Nobodies cognitive mechanisms are more mature than their emotional mechanisms during the early years of life. Raw emotionally conscious feelings dominate in early life. Cognitive explicit counsciousness is ancillary compared to emotional implicit consciousness.

Bethylphenidate
01-22-16, 11:40 AM
The person may have symptoms that point to adhd, but actually be caused by something other than adhd.

Sometimes adhd is also exacerbated by other factors,

I've been thinking lately about this general topic: when it's not ADHD.

This type of literature conflates "actual" ADHD with noticeable symptoms and behaviors of non-ADHD causes... that happen to be similar to ADHD diagnostic criteria. Even if someone were to write a book about "ADHD-like symptoms," it would be very wise to clarify what ADHD is before advising on what to do when it isn't ADHD.

For one thing, public thought about ADHD ranges from "It doesn't exist because I don't think it does" to "It does exist, here's the scientific proof." Books like "ADHD Does Not Exist" and the book in this thread really don't help on the public awareness front. Some people might never read a book by a renowned expert, but they might read one of those two books. That could potentially perpetuate misinformation, stereotypes, and indirectly contribute to the BS we already deal with having ADHD in an NT society.

The other reason: People with ADHD deserve the proper treatment for their disorder, and people with non-ADHD issues deserve proper treatment as well. I know on this forum, there is a helpful resource thread about conditions that mimic ADHD.

Suppose someone wrote a book about that very subject. You thought your child has ADHD; it turns out she has hypoglycemia, not because the book diagnosed her, but because you thought to further explore that avenue and discuss the idea with your doctor. Then your second child has ADHD, not hypoglycemia. He might take Ritalin. ADHD cannot be cured. Neither child was cured of ADHD.

The title of that book is completely inaccurate, unless it's a fiction (which I suspect it is not). Whatever remedies "work" in that book aren't "working" on ADHD, although they might make life slightly easier for some people with or without ADHD. Let's say I get moody if I don't sleep well the night before (this does happen, lol). Does this mean I have a mood disorder? Not necessarily. I wouldn't write a book about how I cured my bipolar, though, that's for sure.

I don't know, just my random thoughts.

I often enjoy reading books from the "opposite perspective," but I'm turned off by how it was marketed. That was clever spam, lol.

Lunacie
01-22-16, 12:15 PM
History of my postnatal and prenatal experiences where obviously emotionally distressful. Nobodies cognitive mechanisms are more mature than their emotional mechanisms during the early years of life. Raw emotionally conscious feelings dominate in early life. Cognitive explicit counsciousness is ancillary compared to emotional implicit consciousness.

Your experiences were documented.

Your emotions could not be documented.

You assume a connection.

But I don't see the connection to the subject of this thread?

mctavish23
01-23-16, 12:56 AM
The OP postulated a "cure" for ADHD without meds. That is simply false and misleading.

As for my referencing Anxiety Disorders as the #1 Most Common Comorbid Condition for

Adult ADHD, the sources were Kessler's National Comorbidity Study Survey (NCS-1):190-

1992 ; The National Comorbidity Survey : Reinterview (NCS-2):2001-2002; as well as The

National Comorbidity Survery Replication (NCS-R) :2004; and The National Comorbidity

Survey Adolescent (NCS-A): 2011. I routinely gave out copies of the latter two, as

handouts / homework.

The research on ADHD in Girls also points out how it is often initially misdiagnosed, due

to the fact that the symptoms appear differently than boys; as they are manifested by

symptoms of Anxiety & Depression. Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

mildadhd
01-23-16, 01:25 AM
The OP postulated a "cure" for ADHD without meds. That is simply false and misleading.

As for my referencing Anxiety Disorders as the #1 Most Common Comorbid Condition for

Adult ADHD, the sources were Kessler's National Comorbidity Study Survey (NCS-1):190-

1992 ; The National Comorbidity Survey : Reinterview (NCS-2):2001-2002; as well as The

National Comorbidity Survery Replication (NCS-R) :2004; and The National Comorbidity

Survey Adolescent (NCS-A): 2011. I routinely gave out copies of the latter two, as

handouts / homework.

The research on ADHD in Girls also points out how it is often initially misdiagnosed, due

to the fact that the symptoms appear differently than boys; as they are manifested by

symptoms of Anxiety & Depression. Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Nobody is disagreeing that anxiety can be secondary comorbidity, to ADHD. But ADHD can also be the secondary comorbidity, to anxiety disorder.

mildadhd
01-23-16, 01:29 AM
Raw emotional consciousness precedes the ability for cognitive consciousness, in early life. Does anyone disagree?

mildadhd
01-23-16, 02:35 AM
Your experiences were documented.

Your emotions could not be documented.

You assume a connection.

But I don't see the connection to the subject of this thread?

I prefer not to discuss the specific nature of my early prenatal and postnatal emotional distresses. But if baby horse was separated from the mother horse while being chased by a mountain lion, everyday. The baby horse would at least feel anxiety as a result of a stimulated fear system and separation anxiety as a result of stimulated grief system. Its easy to document the basic raw emotions the baby horse would be feeling during these circumstances, if we consider the actual biology of the basic raw instinctual emotional systems every mammal is born with.

mildadhd
01-23-16, 02:45 AM
It is a really bad assumption and simply not true to think emotions are only secondary to cognition.

Greyhound1
01-23-16, 06:12 PM
Nobody is disagreeing that anxiety can be secondary comorbidity, to ADHD. But ADHD can also be the secondary comorbidity, to anxiety disorder.

You seem convinced that your ADHD is a co-morbid from anxiety. Perhaps it is. If so, how effective has treatment for anxiety been with your ADHD? Finding the right treatment despite of the cause is all that really matters.

I am a little confused about your level of impairment with ADHD. Your username says mild yet you posted you were moderate?

dvdnvwls
01-23-16, 08:00 PM
... ADHD can also be the secondary comorbidity, to anxiety disorder.
Do you have documented evidence for that?

qanda
01-23-16, 08:30 PM
Since ADHD is diagnosed as a set of symptoms, if symptoms are no longer there because you did some type of intervention, are you cured?

cure
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.

b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.

c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation

Is there an actual test for ADHD, like a brain scan or something? And if so, do some people whose actual test shows negative for ADHD still have the symptoms?

Lunacie
01-23-16, 08:44 PM
Since ADHD is diagnosed as a set of symptoms, if symptoms are no longer there because you did some type of intervention, are you cured?

cure
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.

b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.

c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation

Is there an actual test for ADHD, like a brain scan or something? And if so, do some people whose actual test shows negative for ADHD still have the symptoms?

There are still people who believe the main symptoms of ADHD are hyperactivity and oppositional behaviors.

Kids tend to grow out of the hyperactivity, not all but many.

And with better parenting and maybe some accomodations at school, the oppositional behaviors improve.

So it may look like the teen has been cured, only to find when he goes away to college or starts working at a job, that all the other symptoms are still there.

dvdnvwls
01-23-16, 08:54 PM
Since ADHD is diagnosed as a set of symptoms, if symptoms are no longer there because you did some type of intervention, are you cured?

cure
n.
1.
a. A drug or course of medical treatment used to restore health: discovered a new cure for ulcers.

b. Restoration of health; recovery from disease: the likelihood of cure.

c. Something that corrects or relieves a harmful or disturbing situation

Is there an actual test for ADHD, like a brain scan or something? And if so, do some people whose actual test shows negative for ADHD still have the symptoms?
Yes, that's true - if the symptoms are all gone then you are cured; however, the symptoms include deficient brain function in multiple areas, including working memory, emotional regulation, and impulse control.

Working memory is not something that is improved by education. It is not memory for lists or memory for events, but the kind of memory that you use when (for example) imagining a complicated problem or thinking about how the present relates to the future. A poor level of ability to even bring to mind certain types of complex problems (let alone try to solve them), and a poor ability to consider the future in meaningful ways, are going to be extremely difficult to "cure". (Note again that this is not a lack of "know-how" that can be improved by coaching or education; this is a person whose brain is simply missing those capabilities.) Similarly with the other things I've mentioned above.

So... In a narrow technical sense, if your symptoms are all gone then you would have to be considered cured. However, "curing" just a few of the obvious surface-level symptoms, while leaving the root causes of those symptoms in place, you would have to agree in reality is not going to be much of a cure.

mctavish23
01-23-16, 09:45 PM
mild,

Anxiety Disorders are specifically comorbid to ADHD.

mctavish23
01-24-16, 12:09 PM
Getting back to the OP's endorsement, an excellent reference on the research

confirming ADHD as a true "disorder," is "International Consensus 2002."

Signed off on by over 80 of the world's leading scientists, this is considered

THE definitive article on the existence of ADHD as a real "disorder." It also

contains the "gold standard" definition of a (any) "Disorder (Harmful

Dysfunction)," by Rutgers Ethics Professor, Jerome Wakefield; which ADHD

easily meets. :)


U R Welcome :cool:

Greyhound1
01-24-16, 12:17 PM
Thanks mctavish for the info. I found a link about it and wanted to provide for others to check out.
http://russellbarkley.org/factsheets/Consensus2002.pdf

qanda
01-24-16, 01:56 PM
So the way to tell if it's real ADHD is to take meds to see if they help, and if they do you have ADHD? And the way to tell if it's not real ADHD is to take a natural treatment, & if that works you never had ADHD? Is there research to back that up?

I can't be sure about this. I mean it sounds plausible, but can it also be that ADHD is caused by many different factors? And for most, only meds will help, but in some a natural supplement like Fish Oil helps?

Some here say only meds help with ADHD.

People are always insisting on research. Where does the research show that a non med such as Fish Oil only helps people who don't really have ADHD, but does not help with real ADHD? I mean fish oil may help a few but not the majority, but how does that prove it only helps those that don't really have ADHD?

Fuzzy12
01-24-16, 02:04 PM
So the way to tell if it's real ADHD is to take meds to see if they help, and if they do you have ADHD? And the way to tell if it's not real ADHD is to take a natural treatment, & if that works you never had ADHD? Is there research to back that up?

I can't be sure about this. I mean it sounds plausible, but can it also be that ADHD is caused by many different factors? And for most, only meds will help, but in some a natural supplement like Fish Oil helps?

Some here say only meds help with ADHD.

People are always insisting on research. Where does the research show that a non med such as Fish Oil only helps people who don't really have ADHD, but does not help with real ADHD? I mean fish oil may help a few but not the majority, but how does that prove it only helps those that don't really have ADHD?it doesn't. There are some studies that show that omega 3 can be helpful with adhd symptoms...but the evidence isn't conclusive yet.

Also as far as I know how you respond to medication isn't necessarily an indication of having adhd or not.

If you do have adhd though the majority of people are helped by medication more than by anything else. That's all that the studies show.

mctavish23
01-24-16, 06:35 PM
The way to tell if you have ADHD, is to look at your Family History; specifically for

examples of patterns of Developmentally Inappropriate behaviors, when compared with

same age / same gender, peers.

Taking medication to see if it "works," is the both unethical and, from a clinical

perspective, incompetent.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

qanda
01-25-16, 09:52 PM
So far no one has been able to tell me how to diagnose ADHD, or at least how to get a diagnosis that insurance will pay for that definitely proves if you have it. I doubt many are getting a full neurological test as we tried, but at a cost of $2,000 that insurance will not pay for unless you have particular illnesses, ADHD not being one of them, we did not go through with the test.

I am reading on this site if something other than meds helps, it's not truly ADHD. Is this just speculation or can someone provide some real evidence?

I think my daughter has ADHD. We suspected it her whole life. She was diagnosed at a young age, but by a place that I've heard from both a therapist and psychiatrist "diagnose everyone with ADHD". So we continued to wonder. Just recently a questionnaire showed she had ADHD. BUT, fish oil seems to be helping with her focus, enough that she and myself and husband notice. And focus is really her debilitating area. And I tried lots of supplements when she was younger, so don't suspect placebo. And if that means she does not have ADHD, I would like to know. As it seems docs are now finding commonalities among people and realizing this helps determine the best treatments.

But based on pure speculation, I will continue to keep an open mind. Without studies I will say it's possible that since Fish oil helps, she does not truly have ADHD, but I won't state it as fact, and I don't know why anyone would.

I get it. Some problems can only be helped with meds. But some illnesses can be helped by both natural ways or meds, and the natural ways may only help some. For example, high cholesterol, or anxiety. How is anyone so sure to state it as fact that ADHD can only be helped by meds? At most, it can be said meds have been most studied, some natural ways may have even been disproved, but some natural ways are still being explored and the jury is still out. I can even understand telling people "buyer beware".

Lunacie
01-25-16, 10:21 PM
So far no one has been able to tell me how to diagnose ADHD, or at least how to get a diagnosis that insurance will pay for that definitely proves if you have it. I doubt many are getting a full neurological test as we tried, but at a cost of $2,000 that insurance will not pay for unless you have particular illnesses, ADHD not being one of them, we did not go through with the test.

I am reading on this site if something other than meds helps, it's not truly ADHD. Is this just speculation or can someone provide some real evidence?

I think my daughter has ADHD. We suspected it her whole life. She was diagnosed at a young age, but by a place that I've heard from both a therapist and psychiatrist "diagnose everyone with ADHD". So we continued to wonder. Just recently a questionnaire showed she had ADHD. BUT, fish oil seems to be helping with her focus, enough that she and myself and husband notice. And focus is really her debilitating area. And I tried lots of supplements when she was younger, so don't suspect placebo. And if that means she does not have ADHD, I would like to know. As it seems docs are now finding commonalities among people and realizing this helps determine the best treatments.

But based on pure speculation, I will continue to keep an open mind. Without studies I will say it's possible that since Fish oil helps, she does not truly have ADHD, but I won't state it as fact, and I don't know why anyone would.

I get it. Some problems can only be helped with meds. But some illnesses can be helped by both natural ways or meds, and the natural ways may only help some. For example, high cholesterol, or anxiety. How is anyone so sure to state it as fact that ADHD can only be helped by meds? At most, it can be said meds have been most studied, some natural ways may have even been disproved, but some natural ways are still being explored and the jury is still out. I can even understand telling people "buyer beware".

Research has been done, primarily in Australia, I think, that shows fish oil to be an effective treatment for ADHD.

There are a few of us here on this forum who have found that fish oil is a good treatment for us.

No one has told us we don't have ADHD.

I think the fact that ADHD has a genetic component and my daughter and grandkids have inherited ADHD has a stronger implication that I actually have ADHD than what supplement or medication works for me.

No one has been able to explain yet why stimulant meds don't seem to work for everyone who is diagnosed with ADHD.

But I haven't seen any scientific proof that a poor response to meds rules out ADHD.

dvdnvwls
01-26-16, 12:05 AM
So far no one has been able to tell me how to diagnose ADHD, or at least how to get a diagnosis that insurance will pay for that definitely proves if you have it. I doubt many are getting a full neurological test as we tried, but at a cost of $2,000 that insurance will not pay for unless you have particular illnesses, ADHD not being one of them, we did not go through with the test.

I am reading on this site if something other than meds helps, it's not truly ADHD. Is this just speculation or can someone provide some real evidence?
There is only one possible definite proof that you have ADHD, and that is being interviewed by a psychiatrist who is familiar with the ADHD diagnosis. All other tests are false, in terms of an ADHD diagnosis. None of the neurological tests available have any validity for ADHD at all. They may have excellent validity for making sure you don't have something else, though.

This situation may change in the future. Right now, what I have just told you is the only truth.

sarahsweets
01-26-16, 03:10 AM
I dont think you can say that if meds do not work then you dont have adhd. Or if fish oil does work then you dont have adhd. I think that as long as you see a doctor and have had a thorough evaluation, then thats what you should go on. As far as those other neuropsyche evaluations go, they are just a way for money to be made and generated.

qanda
01-26-16, 08:30 AM
If everyone was given a neuropsyche evaluation before and after treatment, it would be easier to track specific improvements in individuals which could help docs track which meds worked for specific needs.

So it may help this Trial and Error method we now have, which I personally find quit frustrating.

Unmanagable
01-26-16, 08:59 AM
I'd say the current trial and error method serves the money making system equally well in generating and making quite a bit. The tools viewed as not typically mainstream diagnostic tools aren't the only ones benefiting from the sorrows and ills of all who are desperately seeking help.

Edited to add:

I keep forgetting to ask if anyone has bought Soozy's book yet. LMAO

mommytriz
02-01-16, 02:55 PM
I have not read this book so I have no idea what she did or did not do to "cure" her son, but I do know what has gone on in my own house.

My daughter was dx at 7 by two Dr.'s with ADHD. Unquestionable they said. She was fidgety, couldn't stay still to save her life, couldn't concentrate on school work, didn't want to even try, couldn't do crafts, but was advanced in problem solving and other gauges of her intelligence. Meds worked for her ~ she could focus, do her work, sit still . The meds didn't help with her LD ( reading and writing almost to the point of dyslexia & dysgraphia) The meds also gave her very unwelcome side effects ( anxiety, sadness & tics like constant throat clearing, licking her lips and skin sensations that drove her crazy) so we removed her from the meds after about 5 months and two different med trials. We also removed her from mainstream education and found a program better suited to her need for movement.

So she was clearly and unequivocally dx with ADHD. The Dr. tried to convince me not to remove her from meds. and to try another type.

Instead we worked on her deficits with other professionals and most recently in Sept. completely removed gluten, wheat, eggs, peanuts, soy, beef, garlic from her diet. We had already had her on a mostly dye, preservative free diet for years as set out in Feingold's diet. The result from these new dietary changes has been amazing. I would not at this point consider her to be ADHD, though the LD still remain so she is a grade or so behind in reading and writing. She can sit for what I would consider an age appropriate amount of time working independently on a project or homework. She doesn't like it, but she understands the importance of learning so forces her way through it. She can work with her tutor for 45 minutes sessions on grade level math skills without becoming exhausted and cranky like she used to. She has to work really hard to control her emotions when she gets upset ( but she can do it)

Does that mean she doesn't have or never had ADHD. I don't know, I suspect so. Yet I had two specialists & her teacher insist that was her problem in addition to our GP. Two specialists more than willing to give us med trials till we got it right.

I wouldn't in a million years say I cured ADHD, but I will say that there are other things that Dr's aren't considering enough that can cause ADHD like symptoms in young children and adults. The book "Grain Brain" gives scientific explanations for why many common foods affect some individuals brain function in ways that look like a neurologic disorder.

I am not mentioning this book for financial gain. I have no stake in this book. I originally got it out from my local library & then later bought a copy. It is a lot of information and takes a long time to get through for full understanding.

If the meds hadn't given my child such crappy side effects she may have stayed on them this entire time and I perhaps wouldn't have kept searching every possibility for another option. I might have missed this food connection to her brain. Now our life involves a very strict diet, way to much time meal planning & home baking, sending her own food to birthday parties, sleep overs and other celebrations. She can't eat regular pizza, cake, sandwich spread, salad dressings etc..... It is a huge commitment, but one she is on board with because she feels the fog has lifted. She feels good after so many years.

In a way it feels very odd to consider the possibility that she may not have a clinical case of ADHD & instead a broad range of symptoms that caused her such an impairment that she could be dx with it, but which do not manifest if we feed her body and brain only what it wants ~ proteins and fats. I am very comfortable with her ADHD label and never hid it from family or friends. It was just part of who she was and gave a plausible explanation for her very odd, crazy personality. Which she still has:p She also still has a lot of excess energy, but has discovered basketball which she loves and which saps that energy relentlessly when added to her usual 3 day a week dance program.

mommytriz
02-01-16, 03:32 PM
I should also add that we did again try medication when she was 9 or so when she began tutoring sessions. She just wasn't making it through even a 45 minute session without a breakdown. We stopped again that time when the tics returned as she is a singer and does musical theater so having a constant throat clearing tic was very upsetting for her. So believe me I've seen how they can work wonders for an inattentive child.

So again there is that .... the fact that her Biphentin and Vyvance made her a rockstar in so many areas she had been lacking, does that prove she had ADHD? Still has it if it's lifelong? She certainly isn't as focused and driven with our dietary changes as she was on the drugs, but she doesn't have to be THAT focused and all consumed to live a happy life. She went from not even putting her name on a paper before medication to being the first one finished her math sheet and going for another back when she was medicated at 7 years old. We find now that she is extremely good at math, but just regular good, not overachieving genius fast good. And that's OK

aeon
02-01-16, 08:31 PM
So again there is that .... the fact that her Biphentin and Vyvance made her a rockstar in so many areas she had been lacking, does that prove she had ADHD?

No.

Still has it if it's lifelong?

Most likely, yes.

She certainly isn't as focused and driven with our dietary changes as she was on the drugs, but she doesn't have to be THAT focused and all consumed to live a happy life.

Fair enough.

That said, those with ADHD who are not treated via medications have large increases in the chance of various poor outcomes, e.g., failing school, venereal disease, unwanted pregnancy, drug abuse and addiction, traffic accidents and fatalities, comorbid mood and anxiety disorders, divorce, lack of friendships, and so on.

Thatís from data derived from a large population sample, so there is no guarantee your daughter will experience any of those things. On the other hand, ADHD is serious business, and the risk-benefit ratio of medication needs to be considered in context of the longer view. ADHD can be treated to some degree, but it cannot be cured, and for most people it is a lifelong disorder with associated disability that affects all aspects of a personís life...24/7/365.


Cheers,
Ian

qanda
02-01-16, 10:44 PM
No.



Most likely, yes.



Fair enough.

That said, those with ADHD who are not treated via medications have large increases in the chance of various poor outcomes, e.g., failing school, venereal disease, unwanted pregnancy, drug abuse and addiction, traffic accidents and fatalities, comorbid mood and anxiety disorders, divorce, lack of friendships, and so on.

Thatís from data derived from a large population sample, so there is no guarantee your daughter will experience any of those things. On the other hand, ADHD is serious business, and the risk-benefit ratio of medication needs to be considered in context of the longer view. ADHD can be treated to some degree, but it cannot be cured, and for most people it is a lifelong disorder with associated disability that affects all aspects of a personís life...24/7/365.


Cheers,
Ian

Does that data include those who are find at least moderate relief of symptoms by some other means?

aeon
02-01-16, 10:52 PM
Does that data include those who are find at least moderate relief of symptoms by some other means?

To my understanding, yes, but medication use (or not) is the dependent variable that is controlled for...so those who find at least moderate relief of symptoms by some other means still fall into the high risk outcomes cohort.


Cheers,
Ian

dvdnvwls
02-01-16, 11:36 PM
In my opinion, "fraud" is not too strong a term for those who (like the author of the book mentioned in the OP) claim to have alternative treatments for ADHD and claim that their single flimsy piece of evidence is enough to overturn (or even just to call into question) years of scientific research.

sarahsweets
02-02-16, 05:58 AM
Mommytriz-
I am glad that you found what works for your daughter. I think identifying the sensitivities she has because of all the crap in certain foods took a lot of time and effort on your part. I was wondering though, do you think if she hadnt eaten any of that type of food before, would you still have noticed adhd symptoms? Sort of like an allergy- if the allergic substance isnt introduced you wouldnt know if you were allergic to it or not?
Many people have pointed out how additives and stuff mimic adhd symptoms and this can sometimes be a cause for misdiagnosis. I know that for me, I am extremely sensitive to MSG and its a hidden demon inside tons of stuff. I had to read up on all the names its listed under because companies have gotten clever in how they list it as an ingredient. For me, it was trial and error but the effects of MSG for me are very sickening. It also depends on the amount obviously. I am sure Ive eaten stuff with small amounts of MSG and never noticed but now that I know, I can always tell if there are large amounts of msg. Same with sugar. Since my surgery I can tolerate a lot of it, and cant tolerate the fake stuff. I can handle a spoonful of cane sugar but the high fructose sh*t makes me have palpitations, get shaky, and the sweats.
Do you think your daughter may need medication as she gets older?

mommytriz
02-02-16, 11:04 PM
Mommytriz-
I am glad that you found what works for your daughter. I think identifying the sensitivities she has because of all the crap in certain foods took a lot of time and effort on your part. I was wondering though, do you think if she hadnt eaten any of that type of food before, would you still have noticed adhd symptoms? Sort of like an allergy- if the allergic substance isnt introduced you wouldnt know if you were allergic to it or not?
Many people have pointed out how additives and stuff mimic adhd symptoms and this can sometimes be a cause for misdiagnosis. I know that for me, I am extremely sensitive to MSG and its a hidden demon inside tons of stuff. I had to read up on all the names its listed under because companies have gotten clever in how they list it as an ingredient. For me, it was trial and error but the effects of MSG for me are very sickening. It also depends on the amount obviously. I am sure Ive eaten stuff with small amounts of MSG and never noticed but now that I know, I can always tell if there are large amounts of msg. Same with sugar. Since my surgery I can tolerate a lot of it, and cant tolerate the fake stuff. I can handle a spoonful of cane sugar but the high fructose sh*t makes me have palpitations, get shaky, and the sweats.
Do you think your daughter may need medication as she gets older?

The work to figure out the sensitivities was actual a blood test sent to a lab who ran it against 190 common allergens so it took the guess work out of it. Testing I had asked these Dr's about years before and it was dismissed. I finally went for it and paid myself ( looking for why she was always getting horrible colds, not ADHD answers at that time) Many of the food she is sensitive to and her blood showed antigens to are foods she ate regularly in a packed school lunch. She loved a boiled egg in her lunch and always had some kind of sandwich. Looking back I always figured her improvements over the summers were due to being away from the stressful school environment, but now am wondering if it was because we didn't really eat eggs in the summer and rarely make sandwiches while at home. I never as she grew up thought of her as ADHD or anything. Just an energetic child. She had no anxiety, and was a hit at pre school. She could sit at circle time etc. Kindergarten/grade 1 hit us like a brick when suddenly she wasn't able to do any of these things and started going downhill fast. By grade two she couldn't even walk in a classroom and hang up her coat, backpack change shoes without constant reminding yet she'd done it at preschool at the age of 3 & 4 all by herself. Her LD also of course comes into play. So many variables.

Maybe by 5ish her body finally began reacting? The inflammatory response could have triggered anywhere in there, which compromises brain function in many of the areas associated with ADHD ( according to the reading I'm doing and haven't gotten all the through yet) I am slowly making charts of the info in the book to gain a full picture as much of the book focusses on other neurological disorders. I really have no idea, but find it all very fascinating. I just know we have no history of ADHD in our families so it seems to have come from the moon. Her siblings are fine as well.

I don't know if she'll need meds as she grows older. I sure hope not because each time we've tried she gets tics which are unbearable and she gets quite sad. Her behavior had already at 11 1/2 gotten to what I would call average or even above average before the diet changes. She had earned one of the lead roles in a disneys jr. play and could memorize pages of dialogue & songs if I helped her verbally with the lines, dances with older girls at her studio, etc. 100% she would not need meds for behavioural issues, making judgment calls, making safe decisions etc ( at least no different than any other non-ADHD kid might screw up on occasion)

She still has one more grade till she enters high school where she'll have actual subjects and different teachers so that will be our true test. With the reading and writing delay it taxes her concentration more than a typical student to do the same volume of work. Fingers crossed she gets there and handles it all well.

sarahsweets
02-03-16, 05:36 AM
I don't know if she'll need meds as she grows older. I sure hope not because each time we've tried she gets tics which are unbearable and she gets quite sad. Her behavior had already at 11 1/2 gotten to what I would call average or even above average before the diet changes. She had earned one of the lead roles in a disneys jr. play and could memorize pages of dialogue & songs if I helped her verbally with the lines, dances with older girls at her studio, etc. 100% she would not need meds for behavioural issues, making judgment calls, making safe decisions etc ( at least no different than any other non-ADHD kid might screw up on occasion)

Did you try different meds at different doses?

mommytriz
02-03-16, 12:53 PM
We had tried biphentin and Vyvance when she was 7. Starting at 20mg, went to 30, then back to 20. At 9 I believe we started again with Biphentin which was fine ... Till it wasn't. We switched to concerta and then finally just a quick release short acting one which I believe was just plain Ritalin. All stimulated her nervous system to produce the tics.

I truly at this point believe she was misdiagnosed. I think the drugs face those effects because she doesn't need them. She needed us to deal with the root cause of her brain issue. Inflammation and lack of the fats her body needed to operate properly.

Fuzzy12
02-03-16, 12:58 PM
The question that really interests me is how you'd ever know if your symptoms are due to food allergies or sensitivities or something similar or due to ADHD? I mean, unless you do a comprehensive elimination diet, which can take forever, I guess.

mommytriz
02-03-16, 02:27 PM
We did a lab test and got the results from 190 common allergens. There are more comprehensive ones as well as tests to check neurotransmitter levels to identify which are low that I have also considered as well as amino acid level testing as these are important for proper brain function( And again I find it fascinating). I have always wanted to to know the exact reasons for her deficit & obviously have way too much time on my hands because I have found lots of ways to check what exactly is going on in her body. The problem of course is any testing would be just a snapshot of her on that particular day so unless you have unlimited resources(which I don't)to keep redoing the tests as you adjust supplements it may not yield the best results.

Also, again assuming a misdiagnoses as to whether any of this expense helps. Due to her intolerance of the drugs and the fact that I knew she couldn't be successful with her attention span for conventional school based academics being so low, to me it was worth every moment and $ spent to get as far as we have. Our Dr.'s would never have ordered nor my health care(even my extended) pay for these tests, though my private insurance does pay for me to see naturopath to help me understand them.